Live Stream 'Civil Rights Today' in Your Classroom

Electronic Field Trip: Lessons from the American Civil Rights Movement
Join New York Times best-selling author and youth advocate Wes Moore as he leads a special youth town hall discussion about race, racism, and other issues of equality. Streaming live on Thursday, February 25, 2016 from 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Throughout 2015, events across the nation focused attention on concerns in minority communities and racial perceptions in America, resulting in renewed public dialogue about race relations and other issues of social justice. This ongoing dialogue includes not only questions about the policing of black communities, but also educational inequality and the school-to-prison pipeline, the LGBTQ rights movement, immigration reform, and the rebuilding of our communities. This field trip is brought to you by Alabama Public Television and American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen.  
Register for Episode Seven, Civil Rights Today.  

 
Webinar: Illuminating Social Justice Issues Through Authentic Student Projects
Join PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovator Michael Hernandez as he explores how teachers of all grade levels can design meaningful social justice projects.

Preview 'Fats Domino: American Masters'

Discover how Fats Domino’s brand of New Orleans rhythm and blues became rock ’n’ roll. As popular in the 1950s as Elvis Presley, Domino suffered degradations in the pre-civil rights South and aided integration through his influential music. Fats Domino: American Masters airs Friday, February 26, 2016 at 10:00 pm on WSKG TV.  

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Getty Images

Behold, the Gargantuan Stick Insect

An adult female “Ctenomorpha gargantua” from the first captive-reared generation, measuring 56.5 cm in total length. Photo by Museum Victoria

By Chau Tu 

Chau Tu is Science Friday’s story producer/reporter. She delves into the inner reaches of the curious mind to pitch, write, and edit the stories you want to read on SciFri’s website. She likes exploring the mystery of the brain and about what lies beyond Earth. She really hates transcribing, but she’s pretty good at it.

Last Chance to Support Youth Through the Newman's Own Foundation's Matching Gift Campaign

WSKG is pleased to be the recipient of a $5,000 challenge grant from Newman’s Own Foundation.  This grant helps WSKG bring you award winning educational programming and supports projects such as American Graduate and Youth Voice – programs that help local youth see the value of education and stay on track to graduation.  For the month of February only, your contribution to WSKG’s youth programs will be matched dollar for dollar, up to $5,000, by the Newman’s Own Foundation.  Please help us meet this challenge!  

Newman’s Own Foundation has been supporting public media for 32 years — since 1983.

The Battlefield is Hard on a Boy: Suicide in the Civil War

Editor’s Note: WSKG has asked faculty and graduate students in the History Department at Binghamton University to explore the history behind PBS’s new drama Mercy Street. In today’s blog post, Professor Diane Sommerville discusses the topic of suicide and the Civil War.  

Warning: this post contains spoilers. The Battlefield is Hard on a Boy: Suicide in the Civil War
In Episode 4 of Mercy Street, the daring escape of Confederate private Tom Fairfax ends with his suicide. Tom’s boyhood friend Frank Stringfellow spirits him out of Mansion House Hospital under cover of darkness and escorts him to nearby Confederate lines so that Tom can rejoin his regiment. As Frank prepares his departure, Tom begins muttering, looking pre-occupied and anxious.

Forecasting Financial Crises, Thawing Water Bears, and the Pros of a Big Deductible

“Milnesium tardigradum” on the move. Image via “PLOS ONE“

Science Friday airs on WSQX Fridays from 2:00-4:00pm. On this episode of Science Friday here how a group of economists is taking a page from nature’s book, hoping its organizing principles can guide them in building better models that forecast financial meltdowns. Plus, researchers revived tardigrades—also known as water bears—from a 30-year deep freeze. Amy Nordrum, a science writer for International Business Times, discusses these and other selected short stories in science.

Female Students Pursue Male-Dominated Careers from 'Outside The Box'

PBS Newshour Student Reporting Labs launches series on teens challenging gender stereotypes
From new military combat roles for women to Hollywood pay equity, gender politics played a big role in the news this past year. But how do preconceived notions about gender affect the lives of middle and high school students?  
Just As Strong
High school students Channell Rogers and Sierra Buster refuse to let gender stereotypes prevent them from pursuing a hobby they both enjoy, building, and a career goal they both aspire to, the construction business. https://vimeo.com/148130114

Produced by Jayla Hope, Jute’ius Jasper and Timia Moore, students at Hughes STEM High School in Cincinnati, Ohio. Instruction provided by SRL Connected Educators Melissa Sherman.

A Story of Memory, Identity and Elephants in Space

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The book Barsk: The Elephant’s Graveyard is a science fiction space opera set in a far future where humanity is gone, but their successors live on in a race of civilized, sentient animals. The novel is an exploration of memory, emotion and identity, all within the story of a Fant named Jorl and truths that are revealed after centuries of being hidden. Lawrence Schoen spoke with Crystal Sarakas about writing about these anthropomorphic characters. Lawrence M. Schoen holds a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology, has been nominated for the Campbell, Hugo, and Nebula awards, is a world authority on the Klingon language, operates the small press Paper Golem, and is a practicing hypnotherapist specializing in authors’ issues. His previous science fiction writings includes many light and humorous adventures of a space-faring stage hypnotist and his alien animal companion.

The Nathaniel Dett Chorale Performs in Ithaca and Oneonta

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The Nathaniel Dett Chorale is performing at Ithaca College and as part of the Oneonta Concert Association series this week.  They are Canada’s first professional choral group dedicated to Afrocentric music of all styles, including classical, spiritual, gospel, jazz, folk and blues, and was named in honor of the late-19th-century composer and musicologist Nathanial Dett.  We talked with conductor Brainerd Blyden-Taylor who was in Toronta before the Chorale started their tour. http://wskg.org/audio/nathanieldett.mp3

 

Photo credit: Nathaniel Dett Chorale