Music in the Kilmer Mansion Presents Pej Reitz and Jinah Lee

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Music in the Kilmer Mansion at Temple Concord welcomes duo-pianists Pej Reitz and Jinah Lee for a Four-Hand Piano Concert. Jinah Lee talks about the music by Mozart, Schumann, Rachmaninoff, Piazzolla, Stravinsky, and Barber. She also describes the delicate choreography of hands and elbows that two pianists on the same bench have to negotiate. http://wskg.org/audio/jinah.mp3

 

Photo credit: Domenico di Donna via Flickr

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Once Again, Lawmakers Push To Expand PA’s Hate Crime Protections

HARRISBURG (WSKG) — Pennsylvania’s hate crimes law protects people on the basis of race, color, religion, or national origin. But it doesn’t include several other categories–like ancestry, disability, sexual orientation, gender, or gender identity.  Some lawmakers have been trying to change that–but not everyone is on-board. The commonwealth’s hate crimes law didn’t always exclude protections for sexual orientation, disabilities, or gender identity. From 2002 to 2008, it protected an expanded number of groups. But then it was declared unconstitutional for violating the state’s one-subject rule–a technicality.

d5e66b40-9ba9-4847-8f75-1187503c1276

Once Again, Lawmakers Push To Expand PA’s Hate Crime Protections

HARRISBURG (WSKG) — Pennsylvania’s hate crimes law protects people on the basis of race, color, religion, or national origin. But it doesn’t include several other categories–like ancestry, disability, sexual orientation, gender, or gender identity.  Some lawmakers have been trying to change that–but not everyone is on-board. The commonwealth’s hate crimes law didn’t always exclude protections for sexual orientation, disabilities, or gender identity. From 2002 to 2008, it protected an expanded number of groups. But then it was declared unconstitutional for violating the state’s one-subject rule–a technicality.

d5e66b40-9ba9-4847-8f75-1187503c1276

Once Again, Lawmakers Push To Expand PA’s Hate Crime Protections

HARRISBURG (WSKG) — Pennsylvania’s hate crimes law protects people on the basis of race, color, religion, or national origin. But it doesn’t include several other categories–like ancestry, disability, sexual orientation, gender, or gender identity.  Some lawmakers have been trying to change that–but not everyone is on-board. The commonwealth’s hate crimes law didn’t always exclude protections for sexual orientation, disabilities, or gender identity. From 2002 to 2008, it protected an expanded number of groups. But then it was declared unconstitutional for violating the state’s one-subject rule–a technicality.

Some Progress Toward PA Budget Resolution, But Hang-Ups Persist

HARRISBURG (WSKG) — The legislature is crawling closer to finishing its nearly four-months-late state budget–with the House and Senate both saying they’re aiming to finalize a plan based mostly on borrowing this week. “It’s been a long three months, so hopefully there’s more optimism than there was for most of the time,” House Republican Leader Dave Reed said. “But,” he added, “we’ll wait and see.” So far, the legislature has sent the governor its fiscal code, which implements the overall budget, and which Wolf said he still has to review. Now, Senate leaders say they plan to take up the public school code bill and, likely, the tax code–which contains most of the revenue components that would actually balance the budget.

Some Progress Toward PA Budget Resolution, But Hang-Ups Persist

HARRISBURG (WSKG) — The legislature is crawling closer to finishing its nearly four-months-late state budget–with the House and Senate both saying they’re aiming to finalize a plan based mostly on borrowing this week. “It’s been a long three months, so hopefully there’s more optimism than there was for most of the time,” House Republican Leader Dave Reed said. “But,” he added, “we’ll wait and see.” So far, the legislature has sent the governor its fiscal code, which implements the overall budget, and which Wolf said he still has to review. Now, Senate leaders say they plan to take up the public school code bill and, likely, the tax code–which contains most of the revenue components that would actually balance the budget.

RSVP to the Gray Riders Film Screening

See The Gray Riders documentary before it premieres on television. We’re hosting a special screening on Thursday, November 2 for this film, so RSVP to rsvp@wskg.org. There will be a reception at 5:30pm with light refreshments and snacks. The film will begin at 6pm. This one-hour documentary looks at the remarkable 100-year history of the New York State Police.

DIY Monster Slime

Looking for a simple DIY for your family?  Get in the spirit of Halloween AND science with this monster slime activity! https://youtu.be/OYuDNsbdiyQ

Learn how to make gooey monster slime TWO ways with this sensory craft. Don’t worry – the slime washes off hands easily with soap and water! Details of the full craft experience can be found here and continue the creepy-crawly theme by making these monster cupcakes!

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Clean Indoor Air Act Closes “Dangerous Loophole”, says Cuomo

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ALBANY (WSKG) – New Yorkers who use e-cigarettes will have to comply with the same limits on smoking in public that apply to regular cigarettes, now that Governor Cuomo has signed a bill into law. But anti- smoking advocates say more needs to be done to combat the rising use of the nicotine product.  Cuomo says the new law closes a “dangerous loophole” in the state’s clean Indoor Air Act, which limits cigarette smoking in public places. Those same restrictions will now apply to smokeless e-cigarettes. They will no longer be permitted in public places including bars, restaurants and work places. E-cigarettes were not widely available when the Clean Indoor Act was first enacted in 2003.

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SUNY Chancellor Promises Continued Monitoring Of Charter Schools

The Chancellor of the State University of New York is defending a SUNY board committee’s decision to lower some requirements for teachers at some charter schools.  Dr. Kristina Johnson, who began her job as Chancellor in September, says SUNY will continue to hold the 185 charter schools that it regulates to high standards. But she does not disagree with a Board of Trustee committee’s decision to allow charter schools to develop their own certification plans for teachers. The charter schools would be able to require fewer qualifications than is mandated by charter schools certified by the state education department, in some case requiring as little as 40 hours of active classroom time in order to be certified. Dr. Johnson says the schools, like all charter schools under SUNY  will continue to be monitored. “We’ve shut down 19 schools that didn’t meet those standards, so, we’ll see how this goes forward,” Johnson said , in a wide ranging interview interview with public radio and television.