Kart Kingdom Live Game Event

Join WSKG Public Media at the Broome County Public Library on Tuesday July 28th for a fun afternoon playing a PBS KIDS Kart Kingdom Live Game! Four teams will challenge each other using engineering skills to outwit their competitors in the game 'Water Works'. Teams will work together, design, communicate and travel through the Water Works game during this hour long event. Space is limited, register here, choose a specific start time. It is important to arrive at your registered time so we can accommodate all participants.

Passion for Pixels

SciGirls has a passion for pixels. When you look at a photo of a planet in space, did you know that you're really looking at a set of numbers? Remote-sensing satellites take pictures and gather data that is transmitted to the ground as digital signals, or sets of numbers. Then computer software converts the numbers into color images. Have your students play with data transmission using this SciGirls activity as you guide them through encoding messages into digital signals they send each other.

What makes cheese….so stinky?

What lives in cheese? What makes cheese so delicious? It's the bacteria, fungi, mites, and maggots living in it, of course! Check out Gross Science's Anna Rothschild as she explores the stink, behind the yum, of cheese.  

 

 

Looking to Get Your Girls Engaged in Science?

Are you a Teacher, Scout or 4-H leader? Or a parent looking for ways to engage your tween girls in STEM activities? First, what is STEM? Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, we can even incorporate the Arts and make it STEAM, which is how the world works in real life. Most things we use or see everyday fall into the STEAM category.

Animal Homes

Animals, like humans, need a place they can call home to provide a safe and stable place to raise a family, but they go about building it in entirely different ways. Whether it is a bird’s nest, bear den, beaver lodge or spider web, these are homes of great complexity, constructed from a wide range of natural as well as man-made materials. This three-part series investigates just how animals build their remarkable homes around the globe and the intriguing behaviors and social interactions that take place in and around them. Hosting the series is ecologist Chris Morgan (Siberian Tiger Quest, Bears of the Last Frontier), who serves as guide and real estate agent. He evaluates and deconstructs animal abodes, their materials, location, neighborhood and aesthetics.

The Sagebrush Sea

It’s been called The Big Empty – an immense sea of sagebrush that once stretched 500,000 square miles across North America, exasperating thousands of westward-bound travelers as an endless place through which they had to pass to reach their destinations. Yet it’s far from empty, as those who look closely will discover. In this ecosystem anchored by the sage, eagles and antelope, badgers and lizards, rabbits, wrens, owls, prairie dogs, songbirds, hawks and migrating birds of all description make their homes. The Sagebrush Sea tracks the Greater Sage-Grouse and other wildlife through the seasons as they struggle to survive in this rugged and changing landscape. In early spring, male sage grouse move to open spaces, gathering in clearings known as leks to establish mating rights.

In Your Skin, a Catalog of Sun-Induced Mutations

Science Friday examines what happens to your skin once out in the sunshine. “Normal” human skin cells can contain a surprisingly large number of sun-induced mutations in their DNA, a new study has found. Philip Jones, a cancer researcher at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in the U.K., and colleagues took samples of cells from eyelid skin discarded during plastic surgery procedures. By sequencing the DNA in those skin samples, they were able to develop a picture of the types of mutations that can accumulate in skin cells over time. They found that over a quarter of normal, sun-exposed skin cells carry at least one “driver mutation” that can give that cell a reproductive advantage.

Plankton Goes Viral

In just one gulp of seawater, there are roughly 200 million viruses. But before canceling your seaside vacation, consider this: These viruses have their sights set on the ocean’s microorganisms, such as plankton. Scientists got an unprecedented look at the viruses swirling around the upper ocean as a result of the Tara Oceans expedition. From 2009 to 2013, scientists sampled 26 sites across the world’s oceans. Jennifer Brum and Matthew Sullivan, from the University of Arizona, are among the researchers studying these samples to catalog and understand the viruses that influence the ocean’s—and by extension, the world’s—ecosystem.

Living With The Rise and Fall of King Coal

Coal was a vital industry in Appalachia for a century, but its environmental effects and economics have undermined its power, leaving many once employed by the industry floundering. In a special team report from West Virginia Public Radio, the Allegheny Front, and High Plains News produced by Clay Scott, we explore the past and future for coal mining areas and the people that live there.  
Stream or Download Living with the Rise and Fall of King Coal 

 

 

The Great Transition to Renewables

In his new book The Great Transition, renowned environmental thinker Lester Brown describes the transition from a fossil fuel economy powered by oil and coal, to a renewable economy based on solar and wind. Brown tells host Steve Curwood that renewable technologies are already cheaper than fossil fuels in many places, and the great energy transition may be complete much sooner than you think. Stream or download The Great Transition to Renewables

Transcript

CURWOOD: It's Living on Earth. I'm Steve Curwood. If you saw Lester Brown in his characteristic uniform of impeccably pressed suit atop running shoes, you might not guess he has a couple of dozen honorary degrees for his environmental analyses.