Author Therese Walsh Talks About The Writing Craft (Don't Underestimate The Importance Of Coffee)

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Therese Walsh is the author of The Moon Sisters, The Last Will of Moira Leahy, and the forthcoming Author In Progress. She’s also the co-founder of WRITER UNBOXED, a website focusing on the craft and business of writing fiction. She spoke with Crystal Sarakas about writing rituals, the relationship between writers and their readers, and who inspires her.  

Photo by Rachel Burdick

 

Teaching And Learning In Apartheid South Africa: 'My Children! My Africa' On Stage In Ithaca

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MY CHILDREN! MY AFRICA!, Athol Fugard’s drama about teaching and learning within segregated South Africa, explores themes about race and protest that are still relevant today. Autumn 1984. The school year has already begun in a small segregated township on the Eastern cape. Anela Myalatya, known affectionately as Mr. M, prepares two pupils, Thami Mbikwana, a black boy, and Isabel Dyson, a white girl, to compete together in an academic competition.

Correspondence Between A. Burr and A. Ham On Display In Cooperstown

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Thanks to a little Broadway show, one of the most talked about founding fathers these days is Alexander Hamilton. The Fenimore Art Museum is helping encourage this interest in American history with a new exhibition, Hamilton’s Final Act, which displays the letters between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton that led to their final, fatal encounter. Chris Rossi, curator at the Fenimore, spoke with Crystal Sarakas about the exhibition. The exhibition is on display until December 31 at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, NY.  

Photo: John Turnbull, National Historical Archives

Preserved In Glass: The Marine Invertebrates Of Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka

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At the turn of the 20th century, Leopold Blaschka and his son, Rudolf, developed a successful business producing glass models of soft-bodied undersea creatures – marine invertebrates. Carefully crafted in their studio in Dresden, Germany, these models were shipped to universities and museums worldwide as study models. When Cornell University acquired its teaching collection in 1885, the Blaschka models could be purchased in North America from Ward’s Natural Science Establishment in Rochester, New York. By 1888, this father and son team offered 700 models that, according to Leopold Blaschka himself, were “universally acknowledged as being perfectly true to nature.”

Now, the exhibition Fragile Legacy presents the marine invertebrate models of Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka within the context of both marine life and glass conservation. The displayed glass objects tell the story of the history of the Blaschka family, the interest in marine life and dissemination of knowledge in 19th-century Europe, the techniques and methods of creating these beautiful glass models, and finally, the story of the objects themselves as an art form. Researchers at Cornell are using the collection as a time capsule for seeking out and documenting the creatures still living in our oceans today.

Love and Passion On The H.M.S. Pinafore

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Summer Savoyards presents “H.M.S. Pinafore, or The Lass That Loved A Sailor” July 15-17 at the Anderson Center at Binghamton University. Crystal Sarakas talks with Jana Kucera, who plays Josephine, and Danel Vaglica, who plays Little Buttercup. Here’s a fun look back at the 2002 Summer Savoyards production of H.M.S. Pinafore. See if you can spot the WSKG folk who were part of the cast! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0-x_SiGlJA

'Tumbling Turner Sisters' Author Reads From Her Book Thursday Night In Binghamton

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Juliette Fay is the author of four novels, including the recently released novel The Tumbling Turner Sisters:
In 1919, the Turner sisters and their parents are barely scraping by. Their father is a low-paid boot-stitcher in Johnson City, New York, and the family is always one paycheck away from eviction. When their father’s hand is crushed and he can no longer work, their irrepressible mother decides that the vaudeville stage is their best—and only—chance for survival. With so much at stake, teenagers Gert, Winnie, and Kit, and recent widow Nell take to the road, and soon find a new kind of freedom in the company of performers who are as diverse as their acts. There is a seamier side to the business, however, and the young women face dangers and turns of fate they never could have anticipated.

For Your To-Read List: New Books By Fantasy Author Joshua Palmatier

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Joshua Palmatier is the author of several fantasy novels, and the co-founder of the small press Zombies Need Brains. He’s also about to have a very busy summer, with several books being released over the next couple of weeks, and another Kickstarter happening in August to fund three new anthologies from his small press. Erenthrall is a city powered by the mystical ley lines that thread through the world.  The ley is used to light the streets, heat homes, and power the transportation throughout the city and to the rest of the world beyond.  Kara is a Wielder, someone who can manipulate the ley and repair the lines when necessary.  Allan is a Dog, part of the brutal guard that keeps the ley under the strict control of the Baron and his Primes.  Both of their lives will be forever changed when a terrorist group called the Kormanley begins to attack the ley lines in an attempt to break the Baron’s stranglehold on the ley and bring them back into their natural alignment. The first book in the series is Shattering the Ley. The second book, Threading the Needle, will be released on July 5.

Enter Into Faeryland At The New York Faerie Festival

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Each year, a stretch of land just north of Windsor becomes something more than just your typical New York wilderness. The gates of faerie open up, and humans and the fey mingle for a weekend, celebrating music and art and fairy wings. The New York Faerie Festival is celebrating 8 years this weekend. Co-founder Billy Bardo spoke with Crystal Sarakas about the festival. The New York Faerie Festival opens to the world of faerie Friday through Sunday this weekend.

An Exploration Of Contemporary Aboriginal Art At Cornell

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No Boundaries: Aboriginal Australian Contemporary Abstract Painting is an exhibit showcasing the work of nine Aboriginal artists from the remote northwest region of Australia. The paintings incorporate sacred and ceremonial objects, traditional symbols and themes with a modern interpretation. The exhibit opened this week at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum at Cornell. Andy Weislogel is a curator at the Johnson Museum and he joined Crystal Sarakas to talk about the exhibition. The nine artists whose work is part of the exhibition are Paddy Bedford, Janangoo Butcher Cherel, Tommy Mitchell, Ngarra, Boxer Milner Tjampitjin, Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri, Tjumpo Tjapanangka, Billy Joongoorra Thomas, and Prince of Wales (Midpul). The exhibition is on display through August 14 at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca.