Here Are Four Ways 2020 Will Shape PA Politics Moving Forward

PHILADELPHIA, PA (WITF) – It’s not easy to recognize important historical moments while they’re happening. But 2020 has been a year marked by disaster and debacle. It has featured a deadly global pandemic, a reckoning over racism in the wake of several Black Americans killed by police, and a tense, litigious election. Looking back, historians, political insiders, and on-the-ground organizers agree that the last 12 months or so will leave an indelible impression. “I don’t know a historian right now who isn’t still kind of in shock,” said Timothy Lombardo, a Philadelphia-born historian of conservative politics.

Another Moderate PA Republican May Hit The Road

One of the most middle-of-the-road Republicans in Pennsylvania’s state House may be taking his leave. Gene DiGirolamo is running for Bucks County Commissioner this year. If he wins, he’ll join a lengthening list of southeastern GOP-ers heading out of Harrisburg.

More PA Republicans Are Softening Their Opposition To Minimum Wage Hike

One of Governor Tom Wolf’s perennially-unsuccessful policy suggestions may face better odds this year. A day after Senate GOP Leader Jake Corman said his caucus would be willing to consider increasing the state minimum wage, a high-ranking House Republican said the prospect isn’t out of the question for his caucus either. 

Is This The Year PA Gives LGBTQ+ People Discrimination Protection?

Like most states, Pennsylvania has a statute that grants certain groups of people extra legal protection against discrimination. It’s called the Human Relations Act, and it prohibits employment and housing discrimination on the basis of “race, color, religious creed, ancestry, age, sex, national origin, handicap or disability,” or use of guide and support animals. One group it misses? LGBTQ+ people.

Senators Air Voting Machine Grievances To PA Officials

Last year, Governor Tom Wolf gave counties a mandate: replace their voting machines with ones that leave a paper trail in time for the 2020 primary election. That move was based on concerns that many of the aging machines are difficult to double-check in the event an election’s integrity is questioned.