What is hiding in the Chenango River and how can you assist scientists in finding out?

By Science Intern, Ethan Campbell

The Chenango River is home to a number of macroinvertebrates, in this case: juvenile insect species. These species hatch in the water column and live the early stages of their lives in said aquatic ecosystems. For some of these species, the majority of their existence is spent as juveniles in the water. The Missouri Department of Conservation states that Dobsonflies may live as juveniles in the water column for 2-3 years, while only living as adults for weeks. In our brief sample, we found nymphs of caddisflies, stoneflies, mayflies, and dobsonflies. According to Dr. Julian Shepherd Professor at Binghamton University, these species serve as the basis of many food chains.

Science Communication Storytelling Class at Cornell University

Communicating science to the public is a skillset many scientists require, but few are professionally trained in. There is a disconnect between learning science and being an effective communicator of it. Through a collaboration with Cornell University, TST BOCES, Engaged Cornell and WSKG, a new science communication class was born focused on storytelling and relating content to the general public. This unique partnership has led to Cornell University being the first collegiate student reporting lab for the PBS NewsHour. Through mentorship and skill building, students learn the art of how to storyboard, film, interview and edit, creating their own science stories. 

‘Two E-Birds with one Stone: an app helps Birders & Scientists’

 

 

Robotics

What does it take to create, design and make a robot that competes with other bots?

WSKG Science Intern Highlight: Ethan Campbell

WSKG welcomes Ethan Campbell, a Binghamton University student, into the education/science department for the fall of 2019. He will be learning science communication and the role of public media in our community. Below is an excerpt from Mr. Campbell. I am currently a senior at Binghamton University, double majoring in economics and environmental studies. With my education, I hope to work on fighting climate change and environmental degradation.

How Are You Celebrating National Pollinator Week?

What do bees, butterflies, flies and hummingbirds all have in common? If you answered that they are all pollinators – you are correct and we are celebrating them during the week of June 23-27th , National Pollinator Week. Pollinators contribute substantially to the New York State’s environment and economy. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, pollinators provide approximately $344 million worth of pollination services to New York and add $29 billion in value to crop production nationally each year. New York’s ability to produce crops such as apples, grapes, cherries, onions, pumpkins, and cauliflower relies heavily on the presence of pollinators, according to the New York State Department of Conservation.

SciGirls Strategies Live Stream

Wednesday June 12pm 2pm ET

The SciGirls approach is rooted in research about how to engage girls in STEM. A quarter of a century of studies have converged on a set of common strategies that work, and they have become the framework for SciGirls. SciGirls conducted a literature review, funded by the National Science Foundation, to update the strategies with the latest gender equitable and culturally responsive research. Be among the first to learn the latest tips on how to engage girls in STEM. Register here: SciGirls Strategies Live Stream

Webinar from PBS Learning Media on Teaching Climate Impacts and Sustainability

Teaching about Climate Impacts and Sustainability
Drought Stories and Solutions

New Digital Resources on PBS LearningMedia – Grades 9-12

Thursday, March 28, 2019 7:00:00 PM EDT

Webinar Objectives:

Learn about the new collection of free digital resources, Climate Change Impacts and Solutions: Drought on PBS LearningMedia™
Hear from an expert in climate education and a classroom science teacher
Leave with new ideas and NGSS-aligned resources to engage your students in the real-world impacts of climate change

Today’s students need to understand how their world is changing due to climate change, as well as the impacts that those changes could have on their local community. The resources and instructional experience that we will address in this webinar help shift the classroom conversation about climate change to focus on solutions that communities are developing right now to build resilience in the face of drought, one of many climate change impacts. We will take a tour of the resources; which include news videos of communities facing serious water shortages, climate data from NOAA and NASA, and everyday solutions. You will leave with ideas and strategies for incorporating materials into your classroom instruction and hear from a teacher about his experience with the resources. The collection, Climate Change Impacts and Solutions: Drought helps students learn about impacts of drought through news videos of communities facing serious water shortages, analyzing drought data and models, and doing research on and evaluating potential solutions.

Science Communication Workshop Aims to Engage STEM Researchers Across New York

By: Jason Chang and Andy Sanchez

In just over a decade, the United States went from laughing at Stephen Colbert’s “truthiness” to fighting over Kellyanne Conway’s “alternative facts.” Scientific evidence is a necessary resource in this contentious environment, but to utilize that resource, scientists need to build effective communication skills. ComSciCon-Cornell helps scientists do exactly that, bringing together graduate and postdoctoral researchers from across the Central and Western New York region to learn about and engage in scientific communication. This past July, a team of six Cornell University graduate students and postdoctoral fellows organized ComSciCon-Cornell 2018 for 40 STEM researchers. The two-day event explored modern digital communication, with special focus on storytelling, socially sensitive topics, and public engagement.