Milk Street: Schnitzel and Mashed! (Ep 517)

German Pork Schnitzel
Start to finish: 40 minutes
Servings: 4

During a visit to Berlin, we learned that the coating for authentic German pork Schnitzel, or Schweineschnitzel, is dry breadcrumbs made from kaiser rolls, which are extremely fine-textured. For ease, we developed this recipe using store-bought plain dry breadcrumbs, but if you’d like to make kaiser crumbs, which are a touch sweeter, wheatier and fresher tasting than prepared breadcrumbs, see the instructions below. Indian ghee (clarified butter) is a counterintuitive ingredient for Schnitzel, but adding just a small amount to the frying oil adds richer, fuller flavor; look for ghee in the refrigerator case near the butter or in the grocery aisle alongside the coconut oil. If you cannot find it, the Schnitzel still is tasty without. To fry the cutlets, we use a large Dutch oven instead of a skillet; the pot’s high walls safely contain the hot oil and reduce splatter on the stovetop.

Cook’s Country: Blueberry Biscuits (Ep 1505)

 

Blueberry Biscuits
SERVES 9 (MAKES 9 BISCUITS)

We prefer the flavor of fresh blueberries here, but you can also use 71⁄2 ounces (11⁄2 cups) of frozen blueberries that have been thawed, drained, and then patted dry with paper towels. If you have leftover buttermilk, it can be frozen in ice cube trays, transferred to zipper-lock freezer bags, and frozen for up to a month. Upon thawing, the whey and the milk solids will separate; simply whisk the buttermilk back together before using it. Ingredients

BISCUITS
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted, plus 10
tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1⁄2-inch
pieces and chilled
3 cups (15 ounces) all-purpose flour
1/2 cup (31⁄2 ounces) sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1¼ teaspoons table salt
7 1/2 ounces (11⁄2 cups) blueberries
12/3 cups buttermilk, chilled

HONEY BUTTER
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon honey
Pinch table salt

Directions
1. FOR THE BISCUITS: Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 425 degrees.

A tale of two bridges

Downtown Binghamton will be packed with people enjoying ten hours of music as the city sponsors Blues on the Bridge.  Music Coordinator Don Wilkins joins us to talk about the twenty year anniversary, and the logistics of gathering 14 bands for the celebration.  

Photo credit: Blues on the Bridge

Cook’s Country: Okra and Shrimp Stew (Ep 1503)

Okra and Shrimp Stew
SERVES 8 TO 10

If you can find medium shrimp (41 to 50 per pound), use those and leave them whole. Look for meaty ham hocks. If you buy the test kitchen’s preferred brand of andouille sausage, Jacob’s World Famous Andouille, which tends to be thicker than other products, halve it lengthwise before slicing it crosswise. Ingredients
4 quarts water
1–11⁄4 pounds smoked ham hocks
1 onion, quartered
1 bay leaf
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
12 ounces andouille sausage, sliced 1⁄4 inch thick
1 pound frozen or fresh okra (stemmed and cut
crosswise 1⁄2 inch thick for fresh)
1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes
1 ½ cups frozen baby lima (aka butter) beans
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 teaspoons table salt
1 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon granulated garlic
1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 pound large shrimp (26 to 30 per pound), peeled, deveined, and tails removed, cut into thirds
Cooked white rice

Directions

1. Combine water, ham hocks, onion, and bay leaf in large Dutch oven and bring to boil over high heat.

Milk Street: The New NY Cheesecake! (Ep 514)

Chèvre Cheesecake with Black Pepper-Graham Crust
Start to finish: 21⁄2 hours (40 minutes active), plus cooling + refrigerating
Servings: 12 to 16

Angie Mar, chef/owner of Beatrice Inn in New York City, may be best known for her
artistry with all things meat, but we’re smitten with her chèvre cheesecake, the recipe for which is found in her book “Butcher + Beast.” Made with equal parts chèvre (fresh goat cheese) and cream cheese plus a generous measure of crème fraîche, the cake has the perfect amount of savoriness and tanginess—and a surprisingly light texture despite its richness. In addition to scaling Mar’s recipe to fit into a standard 9-inch springform, we mixed lemon zest into the filling to lift the flavor and add citrusy notes that play off the black pepper in the crust. The best way to gauge doneness of the cake is with an instant thermometer inserted through the side (in the area where the filling has risen above the pan), with the probe angled slightly down and to the center; 145°F to 150°F is the finished temperature. To cut clean slices, warm the knife blade by dipping it into a pitcher of hot water; wipe the blade dry before and after each cut and rewarm it as needed. Covered tightly with foil and refrigerated, the cheesecake keeps well for up to four days, though the crust softens over time.

A story of ambition, addiction, and the power of second chances

Off The Page from WSKG · Episode 17 – Journalist Keri Blakinger on her memoir “Corrections in Ink”
 
We may call it shu, or segregation, or medical observation, but whatever words we use are a shorthand for the truth: a coded way of saying you are nothing and now you have nothing. Your world is only a tangle of dreams and realities, drifting through the sterile air of nine by six coffin. ~from CORRECTIONS IN INK, by Keri Blakinger
Keri Blakinger is the author of CORRECTIONS IN INK, a memoir that details her life from being a figure skating competitor with an eating disorder, to her life as an addict. In 2010, while she was attending Cornell University, she was arrested for drug possession and spent the next two years incarcerated: first, in the Tompkins County jail, and then serving a sentence in upstate New York. After she was released, she finished her degree and went on to become a journalist.

Music on the lawn at Hyde Hall

Historic Hyde Hall in Glimmerglass State Park hosts a concert by folk duo Robin and Linda Williams on August 20 at 6:30pm on the South Lawn.  We hear from Robin Williams about Linda and his long career, their travels, and how they used the COVID shutdown as an opportunity to write and record more music.  

Photo credit:  Hyde Hall

Music for violin and guitar in Stamford

If you are regular listener to Performance Today, you are probably familiar with violinist Danbi Um and guitarist Jiji.  They are performing together for the Friends of Music of Stamford, NY. We hear about how they started playing together and how they rehearse while living on opposite coasts.  

Photo credit: Friends of Music of Stamford, NY

America’s Test Kitchen: Pupusas with Curtido (Ep 2225)

Pupusas with Curtido

SERVES 4 (MAKES 8 PUPUSAS)
TIME 1 ¼ HOURS

For an accurate measurement of boiling water, bring a full kettle of water to a boil and then measure out the desired amount. Properly hydrated masa dough should be tacky, requiring damp hands to keep it from sticking to your palms. If the dough feels the slightest bit dry at any time, knead in warm tap water, 1 teaspoon at a time, until the dough is tacky. An occasional leak while frying the pupusas is to be expected, and the browned cheese is delicious. Feta cheese can be substituted for the cotija; if you can find quesillo, use 10 ounces in place of the cotija and Monterey Jack. PUPUSAS

2    cups (8 ounces) masa harina

½    teaspoon table salt

2  cups boiling water, plus warm tap water as needed

2    teaspoons vegetable oil, divided

2  ounces cotija cheese, cut into 2 pieces

8  ounces Monterey Jack cheese, cut into 8 pieces

1     recipe Curtido (recipe follows)

Salsa to serve

CURTIDO

1     cup cider vinegar

½    cup water

1     tablespoon sugar

1 ½     teaspoons table salt

½  head green cabbage, cored & sliced thin (6 cups)

1     onion, sliced thin

1      large carrot, peeled & shredded

1      jalapeño chile, stemmed, seeded & minced

1      teaspoon dried oregano

1     cup chopped fresh cilantro

1.

A legend of the Jazz Age in her own words — and songs

Ada “Bricktop” Smith may not be a familiar name today, but during the Jazz Age she seemed to know everyone, was always in the right place at the right time, and made things happen.  We hear from Gabrielle Lee, who portrays Bricktop in a one-woman show with the Franklin Stage Company. Director Rodney Hudson is also with us to tell about Bricktop’s international career.  

Photo credit: Franklin Stage Company

America’s Test Kitchen: Fresh Peach Pie (Ep 2224)

Fresh Peach Pie with All Butter Lattice Top

SERVES 8

If your peaches are too soft to withstand the pressure of a peeler, cut a shallow X in the bottom of the fruit, blanch them in a pot of simmering water for 15 seconds, and then shock them in a bowl of ice water before peeling. For fruit pectin we recommend both Sure-Jell for Less or No Sugar Needed Recipes and Ball RealFruit Low or No-Sugar Needed Pectin. Ingredients

FILLING

3 pounds peaches, peeled, quartered, and pitted, each quarter cut into thirds

½    cup (3 ½ ounces) plus 3 tablespoons sugar

1 teaspoon grated lemon zest plus 1 tablespoon juice

⅛    teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons low- or no-sugar-needed fruit pectin

¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon Pinch ground nutmeg

1      tablespoon cornstarch

FOOLPROOF ALL-BUTTER DOUGH

20  tablespoons (2 ½  sticks) unsalted butter, chilled

2 ½ cups (12 ½ ounces) all-purpose flour

2    tablespoons sugar

1     teaspoon salt

½    cup ice water

1. FOR THE FILLING: Toss peaches, ½ cup sugar, lemon zest and juice, and salt in medium bowl. Let stand at room temperature for at least 30 minutes or up to 1 hour.

An artist who wore his heart — and his politics — on his sleeve

The Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute presents an exhibit of work by beloved artist Norman Rockwell.  We hear from curator Stephen Harrison about these illustrations that remain forever fresh and exciting, and we hear some surprising facts about this well-known figure, whose sense of humor and humanity remain undimmed by time.  

Photo credit: Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute: New Kids in the Neighborhood, 1967, Norman Rockwell (American, 1894–1978), Norman Rockwell Museum Collection. Licensed by Norman Rockwell Family Agency. 

America’s Test Kitchen: Broiled Chicken with Gravy (Ep 2222)

Broiled Chicken with Gravy

SERVES 4

TIME 1 ¾ HOURS

If your broiler has multiple settings, choose the highest one. This recipe won’t work with a drawer-style broiler. You will need a broiler-safe 12-inch skillet. The backbone and trimmings provide plenty of flavor for the gravy, but if your chicken comes with the giblets and neck, use them as well. Feel free to substitute dry vermouth for the white wine.

Milk Street: The Turkish Kitchen (Ep 511)

Turkish Flatbreads (Yufka)
Start to finish: 13⁄4 hours (45 minutes active)
Makes six 8- to 9-inch flatbreads

The Turkish flatbread called yufka is fast and easy to make largely because it’s unleavened (that is, yeast free). As chef Ana Sortun, whose recipe from “Soframiz” we adapted, explains, yufka is more slender than a flour tortilla but more substantial than phyllo. Yufka stuffed with filling, folded and toasted in a skillet becomes a gozleme (p. TK), or the flatbreads can be used to make sandwich wraps or for scooping up dips and spreads. This dough comes together quickly, requires only an hour of rest, is a breeze to roll out and each bread cooks in just a couple of minutes in a pan on the stovetop.

In “Trigger Points,” learning how to stop mass shootings before they start

Off The Page from WSKG · Episode 14 – Mark Follman’s TRIGGER POINTS: INSIDE THE MISSION TO STOP MASS SHOOTINGS IN AMERICA

Mark Follman is a longtime journalist and the National Affairs Editor for Mother Jones. Since 2012, his various investigations into gun violence and its impact on American society have been honored with numerous awards. His writing and commentary have been featured in the New York Times, the Atlantic, and on National Public Radio, among other media. His book is TRIGGER POINTS: INSIDE THE MISSION TO STOP MASS SHOOTINGS IN AMERICA. Follow Mark Follman on Twitter

America’s Test Kitchen: Mustardy Apple Butter-Glazed Pork Chops (Ep 2221)

Mustardy Apple Butter-Glazed Pork Chops

SERVES 4

TIME 1¼ HOURS

If your broiler has multiple temperature settings, use the highest. We like the consistency that Musselman’s Apple Butter gives the glaze; if you’re using another brand, you may need to thin the glaze with up to 1 tablespoon of water. Ingredients

3 tablespoons apple butter
2 tablespoons maple syrup
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon soy sauce
½ teaspoon cider vinegar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
4 (6- to 8-ounce) boneless pork chops, ¾ to 1 inch thick, trimmed
2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley

1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 275 degrees. Line rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and set wire rack in sheet.

America’s Test Kitchen: Yeasted Doughnuts (Ep 2220)

Yeasted Doughnuts

SERVES 12 DOUGHNUTS

TIME 1¼ HOURS, PLUS 10 HOURS RESTING

WHY THIS WORKS: Our yeasted doughnuts are moist but light with a tender chew and restrained sweetness, thanks to a careful balance of fat, sugar, and moisture in the dough. We chilled the dough overnight—a step called cold fermentation—so that it was faster to make the doughnuts in the morning. The dough also developed more complex flavor and was easier to handle when cold. Shutting the cut doughnuts in the oven with a loaf pan of boiling water—a makeshift baker’s proof box—encouraged them to rise quickly; we then briefly fried them on both sides in moderately hot oil until they turned golden brown. We dipped them in a thin, fluid confectioners’ sugar–based glaze, which set into a sheer, matte shell.

Author C.S.E. Cooney and the magical world of DARK BREAKERS

Off The Page from WSKG · Episode 13 – CSE Cooney and the magical world of Dark Breakers
C.S.E. Cooney writes lush, magical stories about love-struck humans, ageless gentry and diabolical goblins. Loosely inspired by the Breakers mansion in Newport, Rhode Island, this collection of stories is full of fantastical worldbuilding and stories that will linger with you long past the time you put the book down. About the author: C.S.E. Cooney lives and writes in Queens. She is author of the World Fantasy Award-winning Bone Swans: Stories (Mythic Delirium, 2015), an audiobook narrator, and the singer/songwriter Brimstone Rhine. In 2022, her novel Saint Death’s Daughter debuts with Solaris, as well as her collection Dark Breakers (all stories taking place in the world of Desdemona and the Deep, published by Tor.com in 2019), forthcoming from Mythic Delirium.

Milk Street: Everyday Venice (Ep 510)

Venetian Rice and Peas (Risi e Bisi)
Start to finish: 11⁄4 hours
Servings: 4 to 6

Rice and peas, or risi e bisi, is a classic Venetian dish, traditionally eaten on April 25,
St. Mark’s Day. Much like risotto, the rice is rich and creamy because of the starchiness of
the grains and how they are cooked. But risi e bisi typically is a bit soupier. Sweet peas stud the dish, and in the version taught to us by Michela Tasca, owner of Ca’ de Memi farm and bed and breakfast in Piombino Dese outside of Venice, the al dente grains were
bathed in beautiful pale green broth, a result of peas pureed into the cooking liquid.

America’s Test Kitchen: Sichuan Noodles with Chili Sauce and Pork (Ep 2219)

Dan Dan Mian (Sichuan Noodles with Chili Sauce and Pork)

SERVES 4

TIME 1 ¼ HOURS

If you can’t find Sichuan chili powder, substitute Korean red pepper flakes (gochugaru). Sichuan peppercorns provide a tingly, numbing sensation that’s important to this dish; find them in the spice aisle at Asian markets. We prefer the chewy texture of fresh, eggless Chinese wheat noodles here. If they aren’t available, substitute fresh lo mein or ramen noodles or 8 ounces of dried lo mein noodles. Ya cai, Sichuan preserved mustard greens, gives these noodles a savory and pungent boost; you can buy it online or at an Asian market.

Magical dictionaries, family, and the magic of a girl named Zia

Off The Page from WSKG · Episode 12 – Bree Barton and ZIA ERASES THE WORLD

Ithaca author Bree Barton talks with host Crystal Sarakas about depression, the magic of language, and how awesome young people are on this episode of Off the Page. More about ZIA ERASES THE WORLD:

Zia remembers the exact night the Shadoom arrived. One moment she was laughing with her best friends, and the next a dark room of shadows had crept into her chest. Zia has always loved words, but she can’t find a real one for the fear growing inside her. How can you defeat something if you don’t know its name?After Zia’s mom announces that her grouchy Greek yiayia is moving into their tiny apartment, the Shadoom seems here to stay.

Author and disability rights activist Elsa Sjunneson on fighting ableism

 

Author and disability rights activist Elsa Sjunneson talks with host Crystal Sarakas about disability representation in the media, harmful tropes, and fighting ableism in society. As a deafblind woman with partial vision in one eye and bilateral hearing aids, Elsa Sjunneson lives at the crossroads of blindness and sight, hearing and deafness—much to the confusion of the world around her. While she cannot see well enough to operate without a guide dog or cane, she can see enough to know when someone is reacting to the visible signs of her blindness and can hear when they’re whispering behind her back. And she certainly knows how wrong our one-size-fits-all definitions of disability can be. As a media studies professor, she’s also seen the full range of blind and deaf portrayals on film, and here she deconstructs their impact, following common tropes through horror, romance, and everything in between.

Stream Live: A Capitol Fourth 2022

Watch the live stream of the 2022 A Capitol Fourth, Monday, July 4 at 8pm. Join PBS and host Mickey Guyton and featuring Darren Criss, Yolanda Adams, Emily Bear, Loren Allred, Gloria Gaynor, Keb’ Mo’, Andy Grammer, Rachel Platten, Chita Rivera, Cynthia Erivo, Jake Owen, and Maestro Jack Everly conducting the National Symphony Orchestra!  

America’s Test Kitchen: Egg, Kimchi, and Avocado Sandwiches (Ep 2215)

Egg, Kimchi, and Avocado Sandwiches

SERVES 4

TIME 1 ¼ HOURS

This recipe requires an 8-inch square metal baking pan. Avoid using a ceramic or glass dish, which will increase the cooking time and could cause the eggs to overcook during cooling. We like the flavor and texture of kaiser rolls for these sandwiches, but you can substitute 4- inch bulkie rolls, English muffins, or burger buns, if desired. If you omit the kimchi from your sandwiches, you may want to season the eggs with additional salt after baking. For maximum efficiency, gather and prepare the sandwich fillings while the eggs cook, and toast the rolls while the eggs cool.

America’s Test Kitchen: Lahmajun (Armenian Flatbread) (Ep 2214)

Lahmajun (Armenian Flatbread)

SERVES 4 TO 6

TIME 1 HOUR, PLUS 17 HOURS RESTING

You’ll need a baking peel for this recipe; if you don’t have one, use an over- turned rimmed baking sheet instead. King Arthur All-Purpose Flour gives these flatbreads the perfect balance of crispness and tenderness, but if it’s unavailable, substitute any major brand of all-purpose flour. We strongly recommend weighing the flour and the water. Jarred biber salçası (Turkish red pepper paste) can be found in Middle Eastern grocery stores or online. Be sure to use the mild variety; if it’s unavailable, increase the tomato paste in the topping to 2 tablespoons and increase the paprika to 4 teaspoons.

A former turkey farm now hosts a wide-ranging music series

The Old Carter Barn, located between Montrose and Tunkhannock fills the summer with music. We hear from Douglas Carter Beane, who inherited a dilapidated turkey farm, and Lewis Flinn, who turned it first into a wedding venue, and now, as part of the North Branch Art Trail, into a summer music festival featuring a wide range of music

 

Photo credit: Old Carter Barn

America’s Test Kitchen: Goan Pork Vindaloo (Ep 2212)

Goan Pork Vindalooo
SERVES 8
TIME 2 ½ HOURS

WHY THIS WORKS: The word “vindaloo” has evolved to indicate a searingly hot curry because of its adoption into British cuisine, but the original Goan dish is a brightly flavored but relatively mild pork braise made with dried Kashmiri chiles and plenty of spices such as cinnamon, cloves, and cardamom. Vindaloo should have a pronounced vinegary tang, but we found that adding the vinegar at the beginning made the meat chalky. We withheld it until half- way through cooking so that we could use less but still enjoy the characteristic acidity. Moving the cooking from the stovetop to the oven made this dish hands-off and foolproof. Ingredients

¾   cup water

1 (2-inch) piece ginger, peeled and sliced crosswise ⅛ inch thick

6    garlic cloves

3     tablespoons Kashmiri chile powder

1      tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon ground cumin

2 teaspoons table salt

1     teaspoon pepper

¼ – ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)

½    teaspoon ground cinnamon

½     teaspoon ground cardamom

¼    teaspoon ground cloves

¼     teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 (3-3½ pound) boneless pork butt roast, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces

1     tablespoon vegetable oil

1      large onion, chopped fine

⅓    cup coconut vinegar

BEFORE YOU BEGIN: Kashmiri chile powder should have a brilliant red hue, a fruity flavor, and a slightly tannic edge, but very little heat.

Milk Street Vegetarian (Ep 506)

Cauliflower Steaks with Pickled Peppers, Capers and Parmesan
Start to finish: 45 minutes
Servings: 4

To make a satisfying vegetarian main, we cut thick cauliflower “steaks” from the center section of the whole head; you’ll get two steaks per head. The ends that are left over
tend to fall apart because they’re detached from the core, but don’t discard them—use
them to make cauliflower rice, roast them separately or make them into soup. The
savory-sweet topping for these cauliflower steaks riffs on a recipe in “Six Seasons” by Joshua McFadden. Don’t forget to pat dry the pickled peppers and capers. Removing excess moisture will help the topping brown better in the oven.

Author Julie Zickefoose on life, love and raising bluejays

Off The Page from WSKG · Episode 10 – Julie Zickefoose talks about Saving Jemima: The Life and Love of a Hard Luck Jay

 

Julie Zickefoose joins host Crystal Sarakas to talk about birds, blogs, and raising a blue jay during one of the hardest times in her life. About Saving Jemima:

When Jemima, a young orphaned blue jay, is brought to wildlife rehabilitator Julie Zickefoose, she is a virtually tailless, palm-sized bundle of gray-blue fluff. But she is starved and very sick. Julie’s constant care brings her around, and as Jemima is raised for eventual release, she takes over the house and the rest of the author’s summer. Shortly after release, Jemima turns up with a deadly disease.

America’s Test Kitchen: Pasta with Burst Cherry Tomato Sauce and Fried Caper Crumbs (Ep 2208)

Pasta with Burst Cherry Tomato Sauce and Fried Caper Crumbs

SERVES 4 TO 6

TIME 50 MINUTES

Be sure to use cherry tomatoes; grape tomatoes won’t break down as much and will produce a drier sauce. Our topping contributes crunch and depth, but you can substitute 1 cup (2 ounces) of grated Parmesan cheese, if desired. For a spicier dish, use the larger amount of red pepper flakes. Ingredients

TOPPING

2    tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

¼    cup capers, rinsed and patted dry

1     anchovy fillet, rinsed, patted dry & minced

½    cup panko breads crumbs

⅛    teaspoon table salt

⅛    teaspoon pepper

¼    cup minced fresh parsley

1 teaspoon grated lemon zest

PASTA

¼  cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 garlic cloves, sliced thin

2  anchovy fillets, rinsed and patted dry

2  pounds cherry tomatoes

1 ½    teaspoons table salt, plus salt for cooking pasta

¼    teaspoon sugar

⅛ – ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes

12 ounces penne rigate, orecchiette, campanelle, or other short pasta

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 2 pieces and chilled

1    cup fresh basil leaves, torn if large

1. FOR THE TOPPING: Heat oil in 10-inch skillet over medium heat until shim- mering. Add capers and anchovy and cook, stirring frequently, until capers have darkened and shrunk, 3 to 4 minutes.

America’s Test Kitchen: Pan-Seared Shrimp with Peanuts, Black Pepper, and Lime (Ep 2207)

Pan-Seared Shrimp with Peanuts, Black Pepper, And Lime

SERVES 4

TIME 45 MINUTES

We prefer untreated shrimp; if yours are treated with additives such as sodium tripolyphosphate, skip the salting in step 1. You can substitute jumbo shrimp (16 to 20 per pound) for the extra-large shrimp; if substituting, increase the cooking time by 1 to 2 minutes. To use the plain seared shrimp as a neutral protein in rice bowls or salads, skip steps 2 and 4. Ingredients

1 ½ pounds extra-large shrimp (21 to 25 per pound), peeled, deveined, and tails removed

1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided

2 teaspoons coriander seeds

1      teaspoon black peppercorns

1     teaspoon paprika

1     garlic clove, minced

1 ⅛     teaspoons sugar, divided

⅛     teaspoon red pepper flakes

4    teaspoons vegetable oil, divided

½     cup fresh cilantro leaves and tender stems, chopped

1    tablespoon lime juice, plus lime wedges for serving

3     tablespoons dry-roasted peanuts, chopped coarse

1. Toss shrimp and ½ teaspoon salt together in bowl; set aside for 15 to 30 minutes.

America’s Test Kitchen: Challah (Ep 2206)

Challah

MAKES 1 LOAF

TIME 1 3⁄4 HOURS, PLUS 7 HOURS RESTING AND COOLING

We strongly recommend weighing the flour for this recipe. This dough will be firmer and drier than most bread doughs, which makes it easy to braid. Some friction is necessary for rolling and braiding the ropes, so resist the urge to dust your counter with flour. If your counter is too narrow to stretch the ropes, slightly bend the pieces at the 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock positions. Bake this loaf on two nested baking sheets to keep the bottom of the loaf from getting too dark.

“What Fun Music!” comes back to the Forum

The WFM Festival Orchestra offers a concert of light classics, film music, and a “pick the conductor” contest.  Music Director Daniel Fabricius and orchestra member David Ripic join us to talk about the concert, and about a detective story about tracking down parts of a long-lost piece that Timothy Perry stitched back together for the first performance in nearly a century. For more information, search for the WFM Festival Orchestra on facebook.com

 

Photo credit: WFM Festival Orchestra

America’s Test Kitchen: Kimchi Fried Rice (Ep 2205)

Kimchi Bokkeumbap (Kimchi Fried Rice)

SERVES SERVES 4 TO 6

TIME 45 MINUTES

WHY THIS WORKS: Iconic, quick-cooking Korean comfort food’, kimchi bok-keumbap is typically made with leftover cooked short-grain rice and well-fermented kimchi, but from there seasonings and additions to bulk it up vary widely from cook to cook. We started by stir-frying some aromatics (chopped onion and sliced scallions) with chopped ham—a popular addition that we liked for its smoky flavor and pleasantly springy texture. Then we added lots of chopped cabbage kimchi along with some of its savory, punchy juice and a little water and seasoned it with soy sauce, toasted sesame oil, and gochujang to add savoriness, rich nuttiness, and a little more heat. We simmered the cabbage leaves so that they softened a bit; stirred in the rice and cooked the mixture until the liquid had been absorbed; and topped the rice with small strips of gim, sesame seeds, and scallion greens. Ingredients

1 (8-inch square) sheet gim

2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided

2    (1⁄4-inch-thick) slices deli ham, cut into 1⁄4-inch pieces (about 4 ounces)

1     large onion, chopped

6 scallions, white and green parts separated and sliced thin on bias

1 ¼    cups cabbage kimchi, drained with 1⁄4 cup juice reserved, cut into 1⁄4-inch strips

¼    cup water

4    teaspoons soy sauce

4  teaspoons gochujang paste

½    teaspoon pepper

3 cups cooked short-grain white rice

4 teaspoons toasted sesame oil

1      tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

BEFORE YOU BEGIN: This recipe works best with day-old rice; alter- natively, cook your rice 2 hours ahead, spread it on a rimmed baking sheet, and let it cool completely before chilling it for 30 minutes.

Milk Street Israel New and Old (Ep 505)

Lebanese Baked Kafta with Potatoes and Tomatoes
Start to finish: 11⁄2 hours (1 hour active), plus cooling
Servings: 4 to 6

It’s easy to see why kafta bil sanieh, a casserole, if you will, of sliced potatoes, rounds of
tomatoes and flavorful kafta (seasoned meatballs or meat patties), is Lebanese comfort
food. The ingredients are shingled into a baking dish and baked until the flavors meld and the textures become deliciously succulent and tender. Our rendition, based on a recipe from “The Palestinian Table” by Reem Kassis, starts with a simple no-cook tomato sauce in the bottom of the baking dish, where juices collect during baking and form a delicious sauce. To ensure the potatoes cook evenly and thoroughly, we precook them by roasting them for about 10 minutes, enough time to begin making the kafta. We especially like the flavor of ground lamb kafta, but if you prefer, use 80 percent lean ground beef instead.

The Cayuga Chamber Orchestra premieres a new work

The Cayuga Chamber Orchestra honors the memory of Percy Browning by premiering a new work commissioned in her honor. We hear from the composer of that work, Seth Grosshandler, about his composition process.  We also meet the soloist, clarinetist Michael Wayne, about the work he performs, the Clarinet Concerto by Carl Nielsen, and why such a major work for clarinet is played so rarely. If you would like to hear some of Mr. Grosshandler’s music, here is a link to the Violin Sonata he mentions, played by Christina Bouey.  

Photo credit: Cayuga Chamber Orchestra

America’s Test Kitchen: Popovers (Ep 2204)

Popovers

SERVES MAKES 6 POPOVERS

TIME 1½ HOURS, PLUS 1 HOUR STANDING

WHY THIS WORKS: Greasing the pans with shortening ensures the best release, but vegetable oil spray may be substituted; do not use butter. To gauge the popovers’ progress without opening the oven door, use the oven light during baking. Bread flour makes for the highest and sturdiest popovers, but an equal amount of all-purpose flour may be substituted. Ingredients

3 large eggs

2 cups low-fat milk, heated to 110 degrees

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly

2 cups bread flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon sugar

BEFORE YOU BEGIN: Unlike most popover batters, this one is smooth, not lumpy. High heat is crucial to the speedy, high rise of the popovers.

Glassfest is back in Corning

Glassfest returns to the Gaffer District of Corning. Executive Director Coleen Fabrizi joins us to give us a hint of the many events taking place during the three days of the festival.  

Photo credit: Glassfest and Alexandra Elise Photography

Music for Trombone Ensemble

The Trombone Quartet of the Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes is presenting a concert at North Presbyterian Church.  Trombonist Norm Wilcox joins us to talk about the program, and about the history of music specifically for Trombone Ensemble, dating back to the Eastman School of Music.  

Photo credit: Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes

Milk Street Portuguese Favorites (Ep 504)

Portuguese Sponge Cake (Pão de Ló)
Start to finish: 45 minutes (25 minutes active), plus cooling
Servings: 8 to 10

Outside Lisbon, home cook Lourdes Varelia baked for us a classic Portuguese sponge cake called pão de ló. Its outward appearance was, to us, unusual—deeply browned, wrinkly and sunken, and the dessert was brought to the table in the parchment in which it was baked. And another surprise was in store: slicing revealed a layer of gooey, barely baked batter between the upper crust and the airy, golden-hued crumb. Sweet, eggy and tender, the unadorned cake was simple yet supremely satisfying. When attempting to re-create pão de ló at Milk Street, we turned to a recipe from “My Lisbon” by Nuno Mendes, who, in an uncommon twist, adds olive oil, giving the cake subtle fruity notes along with a little more richness.

The Euclid Quartet adds an extra cello for a special work by Schubert

The Friends of Music of Stamford, NY welcome the Euclid String Quartet this weekend.  We heard from violinist Jameson Cooper about the two works on the program, Claude Debussy’s one and only string quartet, and a string quintet by Franz Schubert.  The extra member for the quintet is cellist Adrian Daurov.  Mr. Cooper also tells us how the quartet got its name.  

Photo credit:  Stamford Friends of Music

“From the New World” and back again

The Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra closes its season with Antonin Dvořák’s Symphony No.9, “from the New World”, along with a work by American composer Stacy Garrop’s “Bohemian Cafe” which returns Dvořák’s favor.  Artistic Director Daniel Hege joins us to talk about the relationship of the two pieces, and the performance of Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No.2 with soloist Andrew Russo

 

Photo credit: Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra

A celebration of French composer Cesar Franck

Organist Mark Laubach is celebrating the  bicentennial of French composer Cesar Franck by performing the complete works for organ.  Sponsored by the Binghamton AGO, the Wilkes-Barre musician performs a selection of those in Binghamton at United Presbyterian Church on Friday, April 22.  He joins us to talk about Franck’s legacy, and deep influence on the generations of organist who followed him.  

Photo credit: Mark Laubach

Two choral concerts on the same day will include a world premiere

The Southern Tier Singers’ Collective presents the premiere of a Mass by composer Zanaida Robles. STSC Artistic Director William Culverhouse talks about commissioning this work for the STSC performance on Sunday, April 24 in St. Patrick’s Church, and the weekend residency of Dr. Robles at Binghamton University featuring performances by the University choral ensembles. You can hear some of Dr. Robles’ music here.  

Photo credit: Southern Tier Singers’ Collective

‘The Weeping Time’ and the story of the largest slave auction in American history

Off The Page from WSKG · Anne Bailey – The Weeping Time

Between 1760 and 1860, more than 1.2 million enslaved men, women and children were sold in the United States. The wealth of a nation was built on the trade of people – of slaves –  yet most of us know very little about these auctions or the people who were sold there. Professor Anne Bailey from Binghamton University is
working to change that. Her book, The Weeping Time: Memory and the Largest Slave Auction in American History, tells the story of a specific auction in 1859. But it also examines the trauma that still exists today, and the healing that families are finding as they trace their lineage back to the auction block.

America’s Test Kitchen: Spanish-Style Meatballs In Almond Sauce (Ep 2210)

 

SERVES 4 AS A MAIN DISH

TIME 1 ¼ HOURS

Sometimes fully cooked ground pork retains a slightly pink hue; trust your thermometer. These meatballs can be served as an appetizer with tooth- picks or as a main course alongside a vegetable and potatoes or rice. PICADA

¼    cup slivered almonds

1 slice hearty white sandwich bread, torn into 1-inch pieces

2 tablespoons extra-virgin  olive  oil

3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley

2    garlic cloves, minced

 MEATBALLS

1 slice hearty white sandwich bread, torn into 1-inch pieces

1 large egg

2 tablespoons water

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, divided

2   garlic cloves, minced

1   teaspoon table salt

½    teaspoon pepper

1     pound ground pork

1     tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

½    cup finely chopped onion

½     teaspoon paprika

1     cup chicken broth

½  cup dry white wine

¼     teaspoon saffron threads, crumbled

1     teaspoon sherry vinegar

 

FOR THE PICADA: Process almonds in food processor until finely ground, about 20 Add bread and process until bread is finely ground, about 15 seconds. Transfer almond-bread mixture to 12-inch nonstick skillet. Add oil and cook over medium heat, stirring often, until mixture is golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes.

Expressions looks at an American original, the Appalachian Mountain Dulcimer

Expressions shines a spotlight on the Appalachian mountain dulcimer in this month’s premiere episode. It’s one of only two original American instruments along with the banjo. Our guide is luthier Bernd Krause, who has built more than 250 dulcimers over the past 40 years. Find out who inspired his very first dulcimer and visit the shop where he still crafts these wondrous instruments.  

 

 

 

 

We also hear dulcimer performances from both Bernd and Beth Fallon, recorded at the ArtFarm Studio and Gift Shop in Chenango Bridge.

The story of Cinderella updated to the 1950s in a collaborative production

Tri-Cities Opera is presenting Gioachino Rossini’s setting of the tale of Cinderella in a joint production with Syracuse Opera.  It’s a different version of the tale, with a stepfather instead of a stepmother, a wise tutor instead of a fairy godmother, and matching bracelets instead of a glass slipper — but lots of laughs.  We hear from executive director John Rozzoni, Camille Sherman who plays Cinderella, and Aaron Crouch who plays the Prince.  

Photo credit: Tri-Cities Opera

A rarely-performed work of sacred American music is sung by the Madrigal Choir

Leo Sowerby was a major composer of sacred music.  The Madrigal Choir of Binghamton joins with the choir of Trinity Memorial Episcopal Church for a performance of his cantata “Forsaken of Man’. We hear from the accompanist, Bill Trafka, who has wanted to perform it for a long time, and learn about Sowerby and this rarely-performed masterpiece.  

Photo credit: Madrigal Choir of Binghamton

The Cayuga Vocal Ensemble goes on the road

The Cayuga Vocal Ensemble presents “The Spirit Sings” in two performances, one in Ithaca and another in Seneca Falls.  Artistic Director Sean Linfors joins us to talk about the themes of the concert,  the long break the ensemble had during the shut-down, and the excitement accompanying the premiere of a new work.  

Photo credit: Cayuga Vocal Ensemble

Tenor Tony Villecco Appears On Expressions

Expressions returns with a new episode featuring ‘Tenor’ Tony Villecco singing a set of baroque era songs in a special on-location performance. Tony has been performing since he was ten years old and has spent the last five decades entertaining audiences with his angelic voice and easygoing charm. The performance was recorded at the St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Binghamton and Tony was accompanied by a seasoned group of local musicians including John Isenberg, Marijane Wojtowitz, Joanne Peters and Melanie Valencia. The setlist includes pieces from Georg Handel, and ‘Ave Maria’ by Caccini.

STAR performs an off-beat play by George Bernard Shaw

Forget Pygmalion, Caesar and Cleopatra, Heartbreak House, or The Devil’s Disciple.  George Bernard Shaw’s Too True to Be Good is an absurdist romp through history with a microbe who makes a patient sick, and she returns the favor by making the microbe sick.  Director Chris Nickerson and actor Bill Gorman join us a guides through this quirky comedy.  

Photo credit: Southern Tier Actors Read

Young string players perform in Delhi

The Little Delaware Youth Ensemble and Preparatory Orchestra return to performing live with a concert on Sunday, March 13 in the United Ministry Church of Delhi. Music Director joins us to talk about the concert by the older orchestra, with pieces performed by the Preparatory Orchestra led by Deborah Devine. To hear some performances, click here.  

Photo credit:  Little Delaware Youth Ensemble

Poet Merrill Douglas talks about her work on the latest Off the Page

Off The Page from WSKG · Off The Page – Poet Merrill Douglas

Merrill Douglas is a freelance editor and a poet. Her poems are ‘beautifully gritty,’ and explore the realities of life in ways that are both just a little bit icky, but also capture the life in the smallest detail. Her poems have appeared in the Baltimore Review, Tar River Poetry, Stone Canoe and more. Her chapbook, published by Finishing Line Press, is called Parking Meters Into Mermaids. Merrill joins host Crystal Sarakas to talk about her writing process and to read some of her work.

A new opera in Ithaca is both a love story and a clash between cultures and values

Opera Ithaca is presenting the premiere of a new opera, We Wear the Sea Like a Coat.  We hear from the composer, Sally Lamb McCune, and Artistic Director, Ben Robinson. They tell us about the gestation of the opera which began with a chance meeting in the Orkney Islands and grew into a poetic, but dramatic story.  

Photo credit: Opera Ithaca

The OSFL celebrates musical diversity and music in our schools

The Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes is presenting “Musica Diversa”. We hear from Music Director Toshiyuki Shimada about this wide-ranging concert featuring music by Florence Price, Arturo Marquez, Bright Sheng, Sergei Rachmaninoff, and William Grant Still. The pianist in the Rachmaninoff is Christopher Tillen.  

Photo credit: Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes

A musical journey from darkness to light onstage at Binghamton University

The Binghamton University Music Department is presenting Mozart’s comic opera The Magic Flute in two performances with two casts.  Stage Director David Toulson joins us to talk about this story of a prince and princess on a path to enlightenment, with a lot of laughs along the way. The opera will also be live-streamed on Friday night and Sunday afternoon. 

Photo credit: Binghamton University Music Department

Music for clarinet from south of the equator

Clarinetist Timothy Perry joins us to talk about a special program of music, mostly from south of the equator, that he and pianist Pej Reitz have been exploring over the past few years. The concert, Musica Australis, is Friday, February 18 at 7:30 in the Casadesus Recital Hall on the Binghamton University campus.  

Photo credit: Photo by Iain Cridland on Unsplash and Binghamton University Music Department

Samite Performs on New Episode of Expressions

Expressions returns with a new episode featuring traditional African folk artist, Samite. This world renowned talent performed his first concert since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic at the WSKG Studios in the fall of 2021 and we are happy to give you a front row seat to the performance. Samite is joined onstage by longtime friend and collaborator Nate Richardson in a career spanning setlist of songs. Along with the concert performances this half hour episode features a segment detailing Samite’s journey to upstate New York and the amazing challenges he has faced along the way. We are also pleased to introduce Adara Alston as our host of Expressions.

Rachael Sage joins Howard Jones at the Hangar Theatre

DSP Shows is presenting the Howard Jones Trio with guest artist singer/songwriter Rachael Sage in the Hangar Theatre in Ithaca. Rachael Sage joins us to talk about her many albums, as well as her many collaboration with other musicians.  She also talks about her Poetica project and the different aspects of writing poetry versus writing songs.  

Photo credit: Rachael Sage

An artist disrupts the life of a quiet family in a comedy at Know Theatre

Know Theatre of Binghamton presents Annie Baker’s Body Awareness. A famous photographer challenges a quiet family in Vermont, and is challenged himself in this comedy of academia.  Director Tim Gleason and actor Chris Nickerson join us to talk about the battle lines that are drawn, re-drawn, and the secrets that are revealed.  

Photo credit: Know Theatre

Expressions Returns With New Episodes

 

     Expressions, WSKG’s long running local arts and culture program, is returning to the television schedule on a new night and time! Tune in Friday nights at 8:30 for the best in concert performances and regional art. New episodes are scheduled to premiere on the second Friday of each month and we have an exciting line-up for you in 2022. In the next few months you will see a brand new concert from African folk artist Samite, Tenor Tony Villecco performing baroque period songs with his unique panache and we visit an art shop that expertly uses its location to create a unique visiting experience. We are also pleased to work with talented actress and musician Adara Alston this season.

Ithaca author Railey Jane Savage talks about her new book, “A Century of Swindles: Ponzi Schemes, Con Men, and Fraudsters”

Off The Page from WSKG · A Century of Swindles: Ponzi Schemes, Con Men, and Fraudsters
 

 

 
If you’re a fan of true-crime – but perhaps without all the murderdeathkill – then you’ll love this book which takes a deep dive into 7 infamous schemes that took place between 1850 and 1950. There’s intrigue, deception, sensationalism and chutzpah that is mind-boggling. Railey Jane Savage lives and works in Ithaca, NY, where her abiding love for history’s forgotten moments – swindles, or otherwise – grows against the dramatic background of the Finger Lakes. With an English degree from Smith College, she splits her time between writing and editings. A Century of Swindles is her second book.

Around the World in 80 Days – Sundays at 8pm on WSKG

David Tennant stars as Phileas Fogg in Jules Verne’s tale about a daring
bet in the 1870s to circle the globe in just eighty days. Ibrahim Koma plays
Fogg’s resourceful valet, with Leonie Benesch as the intrepid reporter who
accompanies them. MASTERPIECE updates Verne’s plot with exciting new
themes, characters, and incidents. The round-the-world feat would be hard
enough for the trio, even if someone wasn’t trying to sabotage them at
every turn. Jules Verne’s classic adventure gets an adaptation from MASTERPIECE on PBS.

A woman’s complicated relationship with her doctor is the basis for a new play

Novelist Carson McKenna presents her first play. It is about an agoraphobic young woman dealing with her isolation.   She and director Missy Harris talk about the play and the cast, which includes a doctor playing a doctor, and a lawyer playing a lawyer. For more information: carsonmckenna88@gmail.com

 

Photo credit: Yellow Robin Photography

The joy of Christmas, as seen through brown eyes

Off The Page from WSKG · Off the Page – I’m Dreaming Of A Brown Christmas (with Vernon Gibbs and Steve Gray)

Steven T. Gray is a visual artist, illustrator, sculptor, producer and musician born in Brooklyn, NY and raised in Queens, NY.  Vernon D. Gibbs II has been a stay-at-home dad since 2015. They’re the co-authors of “I’m Dreaming of a Brown Christmas” a beautifully illustrated kids book that shares the story of Christmas traditions and family as seen through the eyes of a young black boy. “I’m Dreaming of a Brown Christmas” is the second book that Vernon and Steve have co-written.  Their first book, “When Good Fruit Goes Bad”  is about eating healthy, creating less food waste, and knowing that you have value. You can purchase “I’m Dreaming of a Brown Christmas” on Amazon, or here. Follow Vernon Gibbs on  Twitter @coolminivandad1.

America’s Test Kitchen: Cranberry Curd Tart with Almond Crust (Ep 2211)

Cranberry Curd Tart with Almond Crust

Serves 8

Total Time: 1 ½ hours, plus 4 hours resting

You’ll need a 9-inch tart pan with a removable bottom for this recipe. We strongly recommend weighing the almond flour and cornstarch for the crust. If preferred, you can use a stand mixer or handheld mixer to whip the cream in step 4. The tart crust will be firm if you serve the tart on the day that it’s made; if you prefer a more tender crust, make the tart through step 3 up to two days ahead. For tips on how to pipe the whipped cream into decorative patterns, see page 31.

The OSFL presents holiday favorites, an aerial violinist, and new music

The Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes presents a concert of traditional music for Christmas and Hanukkah, as well as new music by composer Polina Nazaykinskaya.  We hear from the composer, and from Music Director Toshiyuki Shimada. The concert also features aerial violinist Janice Martin.  

Photo credit: OSFL

Diving into myth with poet Jennifer Crow

Off The Page from WSKG · Off the Page – Jennifer Crow

Jennifer Crow has been writing poetry since she was a little girl. Her poems explore the edges of time and space, and of myth and lore. Her poetry has appeared in many print and electronic places over the past quarter of a century, including Analog Science Fiction, Uncanny Magazine, Kaleidotrope and more. Her 2020 poem “Still” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She talks with host Crystal Sarakas about writing and pushing the edges of comfort in her poetry.

An annual tradition is back

The Madrigal Choir of Binghamton returns to its annual tradition of Lessons and Carols for Christmas.  Artistic Director Bruce Borton joins us to talk about the wide variety of music presented in this free concert at Trinity Memorial Episcopal Church in Binghamton. Photo credit: Madrigal Choir of Binghamton

500 years of fashion created from paper

“Isabelle de Borchgrave: Fashioning Art from Paper” is an exhibit on display through January 9, 2022 in the Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute Museum. Deputy Director and Chief Curator Stephen Harrison joins us to describe these historically accurate fashions, fabricated from paper.  

Photo credit: Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute

The Southern Tier Singers’ Collective performs music from a rare manuscript

Two years ago Binghamton University acquired a famous manuscript of music from the Convent of La Crocetta in Florence, Italy.  Associate Professor of Musicology Paul Schleuse tells the story of its journey from its origin in 1543 to Binghamton University.  Then the Southern Tier Singers’ Collective, prepared by William Culverhouse, performs a selection of excerpts from the manuscript.

A story of addiction, recovery and songwriting in Mary Gauthier’s “Saved By A Song”

Off The Page from WSKG · Off the Page – Mary Gauthier

Mary Gauthier was twelve years old when she was given her Aunt Jenny’s old guitar and taught herself to play with a Mel Bay basic guitar workbook. Music offered her a window to a world where others felt the way she did. Songs became lifelines to her, and she longed to write her own, one day. Then, for a decade, while struggling with addiction, Gauthier put her dream away and her call to songwriting faded. It wasn’t until she got sober and went to an open mic with a friend did she realize that she not only still wanted to write songs, she needed to.

Music from the 16th century is heard once more

The Southern Tier Singers’ Collective presents excerpts from a 16th century manuscript created for the Convent of La Crocetta in Florence. Paul Schleuse describes its creation and its mysterious journey from Italy to South America, and the exciting story of how it was acquired by Binghamton University, then conductor William Culverhouse continues the story with how it got from the page to the singers.  

Photo credit: Binghamton University and the Southern Tier Singers’ Collective

The BPO introduces recent music of a new composer, plus two familiar works

In its second concert of the season, the Binghamton Philharmonic presents “Ascend”, a program including music by Richard Wagner, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and emerging composer Jessie Montgomery (pictured above).  Music Director Daniel Hege joins us to talk about discovering the music of Jessie Montgomery, the astonishing artistry of Mozart’s Symphony No.41, and Wagner’s Christmas present to his wife, and the conductor who taught himself to play the trumpet in the middle of a lake so that he could participate in the premiere.  

Photo credit: Binghamton Philharmonic and Alice G. Patterson

Milk Street: Lebanese Baked Kafta with Potatoes and Tomatoes (Ep 505)

Lebanese Baked Kafta with Potatoes and Tomatoes

Start to finish: 1½ hours (1 hour active), plus cooling Servings: 4 to 6

PHOTO CREDIT: CONNIE MILLER OF CB CREATIVES

INGREDIENTS

1 pound Yukon Gold potatoes, not peeled, sliced into ¼-inch rounds 2 tablespoons plus ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided Kosher salt and ground black pepper 1 pound ground lamb or 80 percent lean ground beef 1 medium yellow onion, halved and grated on the large holes of a box grater ½ cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley ½ teaspoon ground allspice ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 14½-ounce can crushed tomatoes 2 medium garlic cloves, minced 1 pound plum tomatoes, cored and sliced into ¼-inch rounds 1 small green bell pepper or Anaheim chili, stemmed, seeded and sliced into thin rings

INSTRUCTIONS

Heat the oven to 450°F with a rack in the middle position. On a rimmed baking sheet, toss the potatoes with 1 tablespoon of oil and ¼ teaspoon salt. Distribute in a single layer and roast without stirring just until a skewer inserted into the potatoes meets no resistance, 10 to 13 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly. Leave the oven on. While the potatoes cook, line a second baking sheet with kitchen parchment.

Jurassic Park meets Dungeons and Dragons in Carrie Vaughn’s Questland

When an eccentric billionaire loses control of his island resort-slash-theme park, literature professor Addie Cox is an unlikely choice to help fix the situation. But it’s no ordinary theme park: this is pure wizardry come to life, with unicorns, talking rabbits – and murder. The book is called Questland, a mad mashup of Jurassic Park and Dungeons and Dragons. Bestselling author Carrie Vaughn nerds out with host Crystal Sarakas about all things geek on the latest episode of Off the Page.

The Fur Flies In A New Series By Oneonta Author Deborah Blake

Kari Stuart’s life was going nowhere – until she unexpectedly won the lottery. Now an instant millionaire, she’s trying to decide what to do next when an orphan cat, a failing animal rescue and a murder mystery all fall into her lap. On this episode of Off The Page, we talk with author Deborah Blake about her new cozy mystery series.

A Busy Actor Brings Her Storytelling Stand-up Comedy to the Firehouse Stage

You’ve heard her on Snap Judgment or possibly seen her on shows like Dead to Me, American Horror Story, The Middle, or Curb Your Enthusiasm.  Jen Kober brings her hilarious award-winning stories to the Firehouse Stage on Saturday, October 23. She talks about growing up in Louisiana entertaining her mother, her friends and eventually, audiences.  

Photo credit: Firehouse Stage

A Tour-de-force for Violin with the Cayuga Chamber Orchestra

Cayuga Chamber Orchestra concertmaster Christina Bouey is the soloist in this weekend’s concert at Ford Hall on the Ithaca College campus.  She speaks with us about her deep love for Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto, and the story behind the composition of the concerto.  The overture to the comic opera The Bartered Bride by Bedřich Smetana and Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No.5 are also on the program.  

Photo credit: Cayuga Chamber Orchestra

Celebrating Beethoven

After a year of not singing, the Madrigal Choir of Binghamton presents a concert intended for last year’s proposed Beethoven festival.  Music Director Bruce Borton speaks to us about some of Beethoven’s smaller and lesser know works they will be performing.  

Photo credit: Madrigal Choir of Binghamton

Milk Street Pork in Veracruz Sauce (Ep 501)

Pork in Veracruz Sauce (Puntas a la Veracruzana)

Start to finish: 50 minutes | Servings: 4

PHOTO CREDIT: CONNIE MILLER OF CB CREATIVES

INGREDIENTS

1 pound boneless pork loin chops (about 1 inch thick), sliced nothicker than ¼ inch on the diagonalKosher salt and ground black pepper3 tablespoons grapeseed or other neutral oil12 medium garlic cloves, peeled and chopped (about ¼ cup)½ medium white onion, finely chopped1½ pounds ripe tomatoes, cored and chopped3 bay leaves2 jalapeño chilies, stemmed, seeded and chopped⅓ cup pimento-stuffed green olives, chopped2 tablespoons drained capers1 cup lightly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

Toss the pork with salt and pepper. In a 12-inch skillet over high,heat the oil until barely smoking. Add the pork in an even layer andcook without stirring until well browned on the bottom, about 3minutes. Using tongs, transfer the pork to a plate and set aside. To the fat remaining in the skillet, add the garlic and stir off heat.Set the pan over medium and cook, stirring often, until the garlic islightly browned, 1 to 2 minutes; adjust the heat as needed if the garlicsizzles too vigorously.

2021 Serling Film Fest Goes Virtual to Celebrate Students

RSVP now for the 2021 Rod Serling Film Festival! This free event will be held virtually on Thursday, October 14th at 7pm ET. Registration is required. 
Thank you to every student who entered work into the Rod Serling Film Festival and congratulations to the following student filmmakers who are being honored in 2021. Learn more about the 2022 contest here. Categorical Honors

Best Abstract/Experimental
‘When Rain Falls’ by Myanoe Aung
Albany High School

Best Cinematography
‘Be Aware’ by Myanoe Aung
Albany High School

Best Computer Animation
‘A Vivid Dream’ by Jackson Ames
Greater Southern Tier BOCES/Wildwood Education Center 

Best K-5
‘Cargo of Doom’ by Charlie Spielberg
PS 38 The Pacific School

Best Stop Motion Animation
‘Tidal Wave’ by Shelby Thompson
Greater Southern Tier BOCES/Wildwood Education Center

Best Fiction/Story
‘Call Me at 8’ by Julia Guest
Cortland Junior/Senior High School

Best Social Commentary
‘Everything is Normal’ by Julia Guest
Cortland Junior/Senior High School

Special Honors
Honorable Mention
‘Anomalies’ by Genevieve Brown
Richard T. Stank Middle School

Spirit of Serling Award
‘Death’s Gambit’ by Jett Casterline
Greater Southern Tier BOCES/Wildwood Education Center

Best in Show
‘The Chef’ by Jackson McCauley
Maine-Endwell High School

Thank you to Christina Kunzman, Mallory Little, Andrew Polak, Anne Serling & Doug Sutton, and the Rod Serling Memorial Foundation.

Hallowe’en Comes Early to the Broome County Forum

The Binghamton Theatre Organ Society welcomes theatre organist Jason Comet to supply music for the 1920 German silent horror film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.  Jason tells us how he assembles a score to accompany a silent film, and how this ground-breaking film became a classic.  

Photo credit: Binghamton Theatre Organ Society

The BPO Opens its Season with Two Familiar Works and an Exciting New Piece

The Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra returns to the Broome County Forum after a long hiatus with “Emerge”, a program featuring Haydn’s last symphony, Mendelssohn’s famous violin concerto with young violinist Julian Rhee, and a recent work, “Pizzicato” by composer Vivian Fung. Music Director Daniel Hege joins us, along with the composer of “Pizzicato”. We hear how Maestro Hege discovered “Pizzicato” and immediately knew that he had to program it, and we hear about the work of this busy young composer.  

Photo credit: Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra

It’s Time for Laughs at the Cider Mill Stage

Terrence McNally’s backstage comedy “It’s Only a Play” is performed at Cider Mill Stage. We hear from Kate Murray and Rob Egan of the production company BLAST about their new theatrical venture and this irreverent comedy about opening night jitters that opens the BLAST season.  

Photo credit: BLAST Presents

Tri-Cities Opera Hosts the U.S. Army Field Band for the Performance of a New Opera

“The Falling and the Rising” is a new opera formed from interviews with many soldiers. It is being performed at the Broome County Forum.  Tri-Cities Opera General Director John Rozzoni and tenor SFC Ben Hilgert talk about the genesis of the opera and the many veterans services that will be available at the performance.  

Photo credit: Tri-Cities Opera

 

 

America’s Test Kitchen Financiers (Ep 2126)

Financiers

MAKES 24 CAKES

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS: For financiers with complex almond flavor and contrasting textures, we started by spraying a mini-muffin tin with baking spray with flour. The flour in the spray helped the sides of the cakes rise along with the center, preventing doming. We then stirred together almond flour, sugar, all-purpose flour, and egg whites. We opted for granulated sugar, which doesn’t totally dissolve in the egg whites, to ensure a pleasantly coarse texture. Once these ingredients were whisked together, it was just a matter of stirring in nutty browned butter and baking the cakes.

Great Performances

Great Performances – The Red Shoes

Great Performances Presents Matthew Bourne’s Two-Time Olivier Award-Winning Production of The Red Shoes September 17 on PBS

Features Tony-nominated actor and dancer Adam Cooper 

 

From Tony Award-winning choreographer and director Matthew Bourne and British dance company New Adventures, Great Performances: The Red Shoes is a stage adaptation of the classic 1948 feature film by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger. Recorded at London’s Sadler’s Wells Theatre in January 2020, the ballet recounts Hans Christian Andersen’s original tale of obsession, possession, and one girl’s dream to be the greatest dancer in the world. Victoria Page (Ashley Shaw) lives to dance, but her ambitions create a battleground between the two men who inspire her passion: composer Julian Craster (Dominic North) and impresario Boris Lermontov (Adam Cooper). The production also features Michela Meazza as Irina Boronskaya, Liam Mower as Ivan Boleslawsky, and Glenn Graham as Grischa Ljubov. Set to the music of golden-age Hollywood composer Bernard Herrmann, Great Performances: The Red Shoes is orchestrated by Terry Davies and performed by the New Adventures Orchestra with set and costumes by Tony-winning designer Lez Brotherson and lighting by Tony winner Paule Constable.

America’s Test Kitchen Ultimate Cream of Tomato Soup (Ep 2125)

Ultimate Cream of Tomato Soup

SERVES 3 TO 4 (MAKES ABOUT 5 1/2 CUPS)

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS: When developing our cream of tomato soup recipe, we found that good-quality, straight-from-the-can diced tomatoes were good, but not quite good enough. We got a more robust tomato flavor for our tomato soup recipe by using a technique known for intensifying flavor: caramelization. We roasted whole canned tomatoes, first sprinkling them with brown sugar to induce caramelization. The ultimate difference in flavor was extraordinary, and because the rest of the soup could be prepared while the tomatoes roasted, we were able to keep stovetop time down to 20 minutes. 2   (28 ounce) cans whole tomatoes (not packed in puree), drained, 3 cups juice reserved, tomatoes seeded

1½ tablespoons dark brown sugar

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

4 large shallots, minced

1 tablespoon tomato paste Pinch ground allspice

2 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour

1¾ cups chicken stock or canned low-sodium chicken broth

½ cup heavy cream

2 tablespoons brandy or dry sherry cayenne pepper

Adjust oven rack to upper-middle position and heat oven to 450 degrees; line jelly-roll pan or rimmed cookie sheet with foil.

Three Concerts in One Weekend

The First Presbyterian Church of Gilbertsville, NY again hosts the annual Labor Day weekend concerts by the Millenium Strings, musicians from the Magic Mountain Music Farm. We hear from the founder, Burton Kaplan, violinist Marvin Suson, and hard-working pianist Cullan Bryant.  

Photo credit:  Magic Mountain Music Farm

Fun Music at the Forum for Labor Day

The WFM Festival Orchestra presents a Labor Day weekend concert. Conductor Daniel Fabricius and orchestra member David Ripic join us to talk about the program, how this orchestra differs from most large ensembles, and some music of historical importance played for the first time in this century. And we finally find out what “WFM” stands for.  

Photo credit: WFMFO

Two Interrelated Art Exhibits in Utica

The Munson-Williams-Proctor Art Institute Museum is presenting two complementary art exhibits. One is a traveling exhibit of work by African-American artist Emma Amos and the other is work from the permanent collection reflecting on Amos’ work.  Curator Mary Murray talks about these interrelated exhibits.  

Photo credit: Munson-Williams-Proctor Art Institute

Two Styles of Playing the Violin

The Town of Binghamton Historical Society is presenting a workshop led by violinist/fiddler Ed Pettengill on “How to Play Old Tyme Fiddle”. Ed joins us to demonstrate the difference between the two styles, and to talk about how classical violin playing and fiddle can help each other.  All violinists are welcome.  Students should be able to play at least NYSSMA grade 3 music.  For reservations, call (607) 669-4151.  

Photo credit: Ed Pettengill

Icon: Music Through The Lens

The World’s Most Iconic Photographers, Musicians, and Industry Experts Give Viewers a Backstage Pass into the Electrifying World of Music Photography in New Six-Part Series, Icon: Music Through The Lens. Episode One – “On Camera” (Friday, July 16, 9:00-10:00 p.m. ET)
What makes an image iconic? Episode One explores how photographic images of Snoop Dogg, Bob Dylan and Madonna influence perceptions and how they communicate, through themes of interaction, technical skill, occasional luck and cultural impact. The episode goes back to Robert Johnson to find the genesis of music photographs that demonstrate the incredible power of a frozen moment in time. Other highlights include Kevin Cummins on Joy Division, Gered Mankowitz on Jimi Hendrix and Rachael Wright on Billie Eilish trying not to be beautiful.

America’s Test Kitchen Butter Basted Fish Filets (Ep 2121)

Butter Basted Fish Filets with Garlic and Thyme

SERVES 2

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS: Butter basting, a technique that involves repeatedly spooning sizzling butter over food as it cooks, is great for mild, lean, flaky fish such as cod, haddock, or snapper. The butter helps cook the top of the fillet as the skillet heats the bottom, allowing you to flip the fish only once and early in the cooking process—before the flesh has become too fragile—so it stays intact. Throughout the process, the nutty, aromatic butter, which we enhanced with thyme sprigs and crushed garlic cloves, bathed the mild fish in savory flavor. We alternated basting with direct- heat cooking on the burner, taking the temperature of the fish so we knew exactly when the fillets were done.  

2 (6 ounces) skinless cod fillets, about 1 inch thick

½ teaspoon kosher salt

⅛ teaspoon pepper

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch cubes

2 garlic cloves, crushed and peeled

4 sprigs fresh thyme Lemon wedges

Pat all sides of fillets dry with paper towels.

A Famous Play Receives a Sequel

Franklin Stage Company presents Lucas Hnath’s “A Doll’s House, Part 2”. We hear from Leslie Noble, who plays Nora, about the play and what happened after the famous closing of the door. She also talks about the joys of performing in front of a live audience after a long break.  

Photo credit: Russ Rowland via Franklin Stage Company

Local Young Writers Honored

Thank you to all of the young writers who shared work with us during the 2021 Student Writing Challenge. Congratulations to the following students who are receiving honors. You can watch our awards ceremony here. Materials for the 2022 contest are available here! FICTION

Best Fiction, Grades K-1
‘Look Where Your Keys Go’ by Audriann G., Vestal, NY

Best Fiction, Grades 2-3
‘My Fractured Fairy Tale’ by Cameron W., Vestal, NY

Best Fiction, Grades 4-5
‘Haunted Manor’ by Grayden E., Conklin, NY

Best Fiction, Grades 6-8
‘The Discontented Man’ by Heyan C., Vestal, NY

Best Fiction, Grades 9-12
‘The Siege of the Sea’ by Daisy D., Binghamton, NY

Honorable Mention, Grades 9-12
‘Heaven or Hell, that is the Question’ by Emma P., Owego, NY 

PERSONAL ESSAY/NON-FICTION

Best Personal Essay/Non-Fiction, Grades K-1
‘About Children’ by Zelda S., Vestal, NY

Best Personal Essay/Non-Fiction, Grades 2-3
‘Wolf Connection’ by Amina S., Binghamton, NY

Honorable Mention, Grades 2-3
‘Personal Narrative’ by Zoey R., Lodi, NY

Best Personal Essay/Non-Fiction, Grades 4-5
‘The Cat and the Coconut’ by Maya S., Vestal, NY

Best Personal Essay/Non-Fiction, Grades 9-12
‘Screaming for Those that Can’t’ by Erin R., Binghamton, NY

POETRY

Best Poetry, Grades 2-3
‘Art’ by Moussia S., Vestal, NY

Honorable Mention, Grades 2-3
‘Ducks’ by Shterny C., Vestal, NY

Best Poetry, Grades 4-5
‘Freedom’ by Mushky C., Vestal, NY

Honorable Mention, Grades 4-5
‘Death Poem’ by Aviva K., Vestal, NY

Best Poetry, Grades 6-8
‘The Wall’ by Faris S., Vestal, NY

Best Poetry, Grades 9-12
‘Real-ationship’ by Lily B., Binghamton, NY

Honorable Mention, Grades 9-12
‘Women’ by Lydia C., Apalachin, NY

TEXT WITH VISUALS
(GRAPHIC NOVEL, ILLUSTRATED WORK, PICTURE BOOK)

Best Text with Visuals, Grades K-1
‘How to Brush Your Teeth’ by Anastasia G., Binghamton, NY

Best Text with Visuals, Grades 4-5
‘The Lone Hero’ by Bilal K., Vestal, NY

Best Text with Visuals, Grades 6-8
‘The Queen Called Evil’ by Imogen K. and Hannah J., Binghamton, NY

Thank you to Mary Ann Karre, Lonna Pierce, Sarah Reid, Sara-Jo Sites, Sandy Stiles, the George F. Johnson Memorial Library, Jenny Gordon, Rachel Rissberger, Nikki Waskie-Laura, the School Librarian Association of the Southern Tier EAST, and the WSKG Education Advisory Committee.

America’s Test Kitchen Smashed Burgers (Ep 2116)

Smashed Burgers

SERVES 2

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS: Smashed burgers share the same thin, verging- on-well-done profile and all-American array of condiments as typical fast-food burgers, but their big selling point is an ultrabrown, crispy crust. We used commercial ground beef instead of grinding our own because the former is ground finer and thus exposes more myosin, a sticky meat protein that helps the patties hold together when they are smashed. Using a small saucepan to press straight down on the meat ensured that it spread and stuck uniformly to the skillet (instead of shrinking as it cooked), which helped guarantee deep browning. We made two smaller patties at a time instead of one larger one because they fit nicely inside a burger bun. Sandwiching an ultramelty slice of Kraft American cheese between the two patties helped the cheese melt thoroughly and seep into the meat almost like a rich, salty cheese sauce would.