Distance Learning Strategies for K-2 Teachers

Registration Open: A Week of Virtual PD for K-2 Teachers

Educators,

You’re invited to a week of free, virtual learning with PBS KIDS. Hear from teachers across the country as they share successes and lessons learned in the transition to distance learning this past spring. Their stories of how they connected with families, used media and tech to encourage creation, and tackled distance learning in the absence of tech will provide inspiration and foundational tips you can use to prepare for an uncertain year – where some kind of distance learning is likely to be a reality. Join us from August 3 – 6 for four days of online learning and fun with a community of teachers like you! Register Now

Your Week at a Glance

Your week of virtual learning will start and end with LIVE, online learning events with other K-2 teachers. The middle of the week will feature daily, asynchronous challenges emailed each morning that you can do on your own time, to continue your learning and build upon distance learning themes and strategies.

Camp PBS LearningMedia!

Whether you’re looking for music and dance activities, science experiments, family-friendly adventures, or learning about dinosaurs (plus more!), you will find media and activity resources in the Camp PBS LearningMedia collection. We’ve gathered fun, exploratory resources for you to use as you plan summer fun. This collection of resources leverages fun, educational activities to include in your daily schedule, as well as resources to help seed ideas for introducing topics to your campers. Happy exploring! Avoid the “summer slide” and keep the spirit of curiosity alive with these informal, anytime learning resources in the Summer Learning collection.

WSKG Learn at Home

WSKG Learn at Home TV

Our daytime programming schedule has been curated with PK-12 learners in mind! WSKG’s main channel airs programming M-F between 6 am-3 pm for learners in grades PK-2. The hours of 3pm-5pm are for learners in grades 3-5. WSKG KIDS 24/7 channel offers round-the-clock programming for PK-2 learners. WSKG WORLD is airing series geared toward students in grades 6-12 Monday through Friday between 12pm-5pm.

Maine-Endwell Teacher Honored by PBS

Join us in offering a big congrats to Rachel Murat of Maine-Endwell Central School District in Endwell, NY, who’s been selected to take part in the 2020 PBS Digital Innovator Program! We’re excited to follow along with Rachel and this group of classroom changemakers as they participate in professional development and opportunities to share strategies, empower peers, and inspire students through innovative use of technology and media. CITY | Endwell, NY

SCHOOL | Maine-Endwell High School

ROLE | High School Teacher, 2020 New York State Teacher of the Year

GRADE LEVELS | 10-12

TWITTER | @MrsMurat

PBS Digital Innovators are leaders in their schools and their communities, and help improve student learning through their thoughtful use of technology and digital media. The PBS Digital Innovator program helps these educators connect with others who are in the same space by providing tools to guide their leadership and growth, and opportunities to share their ideas in meaningful and transformative ways.  

 

Talking with Kids About Healthy Habits & Illness

Resources for Parents & Caregivers 

How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus
Daniel Tiger for Parents App

Resources for Kids

DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD:

Doctor Daniel Game
In My Bathroom Game
Play at Home with Daniel Tiger App
“Rest is Best” Strategy Song (video)
Germs Germs Go Away (video)

SESAME STREET:

Abby and Elmo’s Potty Plan! Game
Step by Step Handwashing with Elmo
Elmo and Rosita: The Right Way to Sneeze! (video)

CURIOUS GEORGE:

George the Germophobe (video)

SUPER WHY!:

ABC Scrub With Me! Resources for Educators 

KET’s Healthy Habits | Everyday Learning
Iowa PBS’ The Federal Bureau of Ick
South Florida PBS’ KidVision: How to Make Soap

PBS Kids Writers Contest

PBS KIDS & WSKG Youth Writers Contests Now Open

This contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. These contests are open to children who reside in the region that WSKG serves. 

2020 PBS Kids Writers Contest Entry Form (K-3)
2020 PBS KIDS Writers Contest RULES (K-3)
2020 WSKG Youth Writers Contest Entry Form (4-6)

Submissions must be postmarked by April 30, 2020 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton-Durham
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

These contests are supported by volunteers from the School Librarian Association of the Southern Tier East, the George F. Johnson Public Library, and the Four County Library System. Thank you!

Local Teacher Shares ‘Journey Home’ Game

As part of a Spring 2018 Binghamton University Elementary Education Curriculum Development course, Dr. Jenny Gordon assigned graduate students to craft a board game for use in a classroom. Then-student Alisha Jermayne Merrill created ‘Journey Home’, an immersive Social Studies game for grades 3-5 that focuses on Native American cultures. Ms. Merrill drew from her own experiences and culture to develop this game. She is now teaching with the Johnson City School District in Johnson City, NY. Check out our interview with Ms. Merrill here.

Register for Free PBS Media Literacy Live Learning Series

Join us on a media literacy journey! Register for FREE and explore key topics like: what it takes to be a good media mentor; how to responsibly integrate media in your classroom; and how to help children create original content. PBS will provide a certificate of attendance for each one-hour virtual professional learning event. Part 1 | Media Mentorship in Your Classroom
November 19 @ 7:00 PM ET

It’s the classic debate: is there a place for media in any learning environment? If so, what is our role in helping children–even the littlest learners–understand and use it?

The NPR Student Podcast Challenge Is Back!

HOW IT WORKS / WHERE TO BEGIN / THE RULES / THE JUDGES / SUBMIT / CONTACT US

NPR is inviting students around the country to create a podcast, then — with the help of a teacher — compete for a chance to win our grand prize and have your work appear on NPR. Be a part of the NPR Student Podcast Challenge. Here’s how it works: Put together a podcast with your class or extracurricular group. Then your teacher can submit it to us. This contest is for teachers with students between 5th and 12th grade.

Connect NY: Trauma Informed Education

According to state education officials, the number of students facing mental health challenges is dramatically increasing.  To adapt, schools are incorporating Trauma Informed Practices into the classroom. We will discuss why trauma is affecting more children, and look at the skills educators are adopting to help them cope. Panelists

Dr. John M. Garruto, D.Ed., NCSP, School Psychologist for the Oswego City School District; President, New York Association of School Psychologists

Dr. Sandy Addis, Executive Director, National Dropout Prevention Center

Melissa S. Evans, Director of Student Support Services, Syracuse City School District; Co-chair, Trauma and Resilience Advocacy Committee
Tracey Musarra Marchese, MSW, LCSW-R, Professor of Practice, School of Social Work, Falk College, Syracuse University

Watch this episode on WSKG TV October 19th, 2019 at 5:00a.m.

Join us as we uncover compelling and unexpected stories throughout New York State and the history and systemic forces influencing current realities. Connect: NY is produced by WCNY (Syracuse, NY) and aired in partnership with WSKG.

Understanding LGBTQ + Identity: A Toolkit for Educators

This collection offers a series of free digital media resources to help administrators, guidance counselors, and educators understand and effectively address the complex and difficult issues faced by LGBTQ students. The video content is scaffolded by a suite of materials (informational text, conversation guides, discussion questions, and teaching tips) to facilitate their use in professional development settings. The collection also has a growing selection of core curriculum video-based content to help educators integrate LGBTQ narratives into ELA and social studies classrooms.

 

 

 

 

#143DayEDU

WSKG is pleased to partner for this very special twitter chat in honor of Fred Rogers. Join the discussion May 23, 2019 at 8:30pm EST and follow #143DayEDU. Your hosts for the chat are Sean Gaillard and Dr. Jennifer Williams. Our Director of Education, Jackie Stapleton-Durham, will also be part of the chat and curating input from local educators. HOSTS
Mr. Gaillard is an award winning educator and Principal at Lexington Middle School in Lexington, North Carolina. He founded #CelebrateMonday and #TrendthePositive and is author of The Pepper Effect: Tap Into the Magic of Creativity, Collaboration, and Innovation. 

Dr. Williams has worked as a school administrator, literacy specialist, classroom teacher, and currently, as a professor at Saint Leo University.

‘Regents Review’ Returns to Aid Students Preparing for State Exams

Regents Review 2.0 prepares learners for the New York State Regents exams.
For each Regents exam there is a one-hour long exam review video. Some of the videos are also broken into shorter clips for those looking for help with a particular topic. The teachers involved in creating these videos formulated lists of recommended online resources for further study – check them out! The video programs are also broadcast by all New York State public television stations – including WSKG. The schedule of air dates for WSKG TV is listed below.

Free PD Series for Social Studies Teachers

“Let me tell you what I wish I’d known
When I was young and dreamed of glory
You have no control:
Who lives
Who dies
Who tells your story?”
–”Who lives, who dies, who tells your story?”, Hamilton
Every student has a voice and a story. Is it true that they have no control over how their stories are told, or can we provide resources to help them direct their own narratives? In this three part series educators will have the opportunity to explore tools, devices, and unique practices which encourage students to not only critically consider how history is defined, but also how to ensure their own stories are accurately documented and their point of view is conveyed. Cultivating Inclusive Spaces for Empathy Inquiry
April 10, 2019 | 7:00 P.M.

Brene Brown says, “Empathy is simply listening, holding space, withholding judgment, emotionally connecting, and communicating that incredibly healing message of you’re not alone.” And while the concept is clearly conveyed, teaching empathy, as it applies to understanding history especially, is not quite as clear cut or simple. Teachers, we hope you’ll join us for  the first of our three part series specifically for Social Studies educators, “Who Tells Your Story.” Through this exciting ‘live learning’ event, we’ll discuss how to cultivate inclusive spaces within your classroom so students can build a foundation for learning and inquiry that allows them to empathize with, and better understand, different perspectives.

Social-Emotional ‘Live-Learning’ Series with PBS KIDS

Won’t you be our neighbor?! Teachers, join us for this three part series where we explore Social Emotional Learning “Core Competencies” (CASEL@2017). With the help from Arthur, Peg+Cat and Daniel Tiger we will dive into how to weave SEL into your everyday lessons. Register for the three part “Live Learning” experience: Cultivating Good Neighbor Skills in the Classroom. Practicing Mindfulness
March 28 @7PM ET
Every day when you’re walking down the street…

Everybody that you meet…

has an original point of view.

Inspiring Young Scientists Through STEAM Education

Our world changes every day, and with that, our teaching practice does to: there is always more to learn as a STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Math) educator. In this three part series, we’ll look at ways to inspire our young scientists and make concepts such as data and computational thinking engaging!  Register for the three part “Live Learning” experience: Inspiring Young Scientists Through STEAM Education. Helping Students Interpret Data
March 19th @7PM ET
Data,data, data..data is everywhere! How do we teach students to interpret data?

‘Live Learning’ Professional Development Series for Teachers

The world is saturated with information – all types of media, with millions of varying messages. Not only are your students consuming the media, but with new technology and inexpensive tools, they are also creating content and using media in myriad ways to test their ideas, and tell their stories.

Join your peers for a three part PBS ‘Live Learning’ experience: Empowering Young Media Consumers & Creators

Twitter Chat Series: K-12 Digital Citizenship

Join WSKG as our Education Director moderates a series of Twitter chats focused on issues surrounding Digital Citizenship. We’ve invited local guest stars to share their expertise during each chat. Share, learn, and help us to better understand the needs of our K-12 communities in regard to #DigCit! Participants will also have the chance to win prizes throughout each chat. All chats begin at 9pm EST.

Free Professional Development for PK-2 Teachers

‘Learning with Littles: Demonstrating Empathy & Perseverance’
January 8, 2019 at 7:00pm

It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood! Please come along with us, Daniel Tiger and his friends as we explore creative ways to weave social and emotional learning into your classroom. This virtual professional learning adventure is designed and led by fellow educators, and is the third in our four part ‘Learning with Littles’ series for Pre K-2 educators. The hour-long session will highlight exciting resources and models that can immediately be implemented in the classroom. Led by PBS Digital Innovator All Stars Ashley Judd and Mallory Mbalia, this session is one that you do not want to miss.

"As I knew him, My Dad, Rod Serling" By Anne Serling

2019 Rod Serling Film Festival Accepting Entries

The 2019 Rod Serling Film Festival is open! WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 3, 2019. Entrants must use the online submission form. The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Teaching Winter Holidays with PBS LearningMedia

Wintertime is full of reasons to celebrate. Students will enjoy learning about the fascinating and sometimes surprising origins of familiar holidays and learning about new holidays, too! The winter holiday video collection from PBS LearningMedia is lesson-ready for Grade 2 – 6 classrooms.
December & January Holidays

Hanukkah
Christmas
Kwanzaa
New Years Day
Chinese New Year

Educator Resources

1-minute videos to stream or download
Support materials: vocabulary sheet, activity, discussion questions, and teacher key
Standards-aligned, Grades 2 – 6

Not yet a PBS LearningMedia user? Sign up for a free account and gain access to thousands of free, innovative, standards-aligned and curriculum-targeted digital resources. Browse the digital resources produced by WSKG to support classroom learning in math, history, and health.

Free Workshop for PK-2 Teachers

Learning with Littles: Developing Cultural Awareness
Teachers! We’re excited to invite you to a live discussion with illustrator, animator, writer, director and producer, Joe Murray, who created the new PBS KIDS hit series, Let’s Go Luna. You’ll recognize Joe’s previous work as creator of “Rocko’s Modern Life” and “Camp Lazlo.” Together with on staff anthropologist Erik Messal and cultural advisors from more than a dozen countries, Joe has a developed a fun, sweet, irreverent way for even our littlest learners to travel the world and develop global awareness. Designed by educators, the ‘Learning with Littles’ professional learning series for Pre K-2 educators provides ideas for how to responsibly integrate media into your learning environment. In addition to meeting Joe and other members of the Let’s Go Luna team, you’ll meet other educators, who will share teaching models and strategies to help you build a culturally responsive learning environment.

PBS KIDS Resources for Computer Science

In celebration of Computer Science Education Week from December 3-9, we’re inviting teachers and parents to discover PBS KIDS resources that introduce little ones to coding, storytelling, and creative problem-solving. With PBS KIDS ScratchJr, kids can create their own interactive stories and games featuring their favorite PBS KIDS characters. The storytelling possibilities are endless with this creative coding app for children ages 5-8. Check out the PBS KIDS ScratchJr collection on PBS LearningMedia and splash page on PBS KIDS. You’ll find resources and activities designed for educators to support the use of the app in both formal and informal learning settings.

Free Workshop for PK-2 Teachers

Teachers, join us as we nurture curiosity and critical thinking with our littles! This virtual professional learning experience will provide tips on how to responsibly integrate media in the classroom for your early learners. How do you encourage an eagerness to explore in the classroom? A desire to learn? What are the best methods to keep students engaged and learning in the classroom?

‘Native America’ TV Series & Event Coming This Fall

Explore the world created by America’s First Peoples. The four part series reaches back 15,000 years to reveal massive cities aligned to the stars, unique systems of science and spirituality, and 100 million people connected by social networks spanning two continents. https://youtu.be/DJy9STLb9IU

EPISODES
From Caves to Cosmos
Combine ancient wisdom and modern science to answer a 15,000-year-old question: who were America’s First Peoples? Nature to Nations
Explore the rise of great American nations, from monarchies to democracies. Cities of the Sky
Discover the cosmological secrets behind America’s ancient cities.

For the Love of Lit: Free Virtual Professional Learning Series for Teachers

Teachers! Join us as we bring the Great American Read to your classroom. 

This four-part virtual professional learning series is designed for English Language Arts teachers, created FOR educators BY educators. With an emphasis on fun, engaging, accessible, and free tools for classrooms, this series will highlight techniques for engaging learners through essential communication skills, and present ideas for enhancing teaching practice through activities, projects, passion, and a connection to literature. PBS will provide a certificate of attendance for each one hour virtual professional learning event. For the Love of Lit: Inspiring Young Authors, with NaNoWriMo founder Chris Baty
October 17 @ 7-8pm ET

Designed by educators, this virtual professional learning experience will introduce a number of teaching models and strategies to enhance your practice. How can you inspire your students to be passionate writers and engaged readers?

Free ‘Little Women’ Webinar for Teachers & Librarians

FREE Webinar for Teachers & Librarians, Grades 6-12
Thursday, May 24, 2018 at 7pm EST

Loved by generations worldwide, LITTLE WOMEN is a universal coming-of-age story. In this webinar for educators, we use the new MASTERPIECE adaptation of LITTLE WOMEN and partner with the Great Books Foundation to explore why the classic novel’s themes still resonate with audiences 150 years after its publication. This webinar will support English teachers and librarians grades 6-12 and offers:

A tour of the media-based resources on PBS LearningMedia, featuring key scenes from the MASTERPIECE broadcast
A discussion of Great Books Foundation’s shared inquiry technique to help students think critically about the novel and reflect on its relevance today
Q&A with resource developers

Register Now

A Certificate of Participation will be sent to all who attend the live stream. A recording link will be available. Registration is limited so please sign up today.

Contest Deadline Approaching

The PBS KIDS Writers Contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest K-3 Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest Entry Form & Rules

Submissions must be postmarked by April 30, 2018 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton-Durham
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

Hear Here! | Singing to Freedom: Slave Songs and the Underground Railroad



Many of us know and love traditional spirituals like Swing Low, Sweet Chariot or Wade in the Water. But a lesser known aspect is that many of these songs served as coded messages for the Underground Railroad. We’ll explore the connection between slavery and the songs that slaves sang on their way to freedom. (Producer: Crystal Sarakas)

Classroom Resources

No Man Can Hinder Me: The Journey From Slavery to Emancipation Through Song by Velma Maia Thomas

‘Coded Spirituals’ | A full teacher resource gallery from PBS LearningMedia. Follow the Drinking Gourd | This book, song video, and Reading Rainbow episode offer kids.

Hear Here! | From Kid to Musician

Brian Manker went to school in upstate New York in the Endwell, Vestal, and Binghamton communities. He wanted to be a football player, but then he discovered

the cello.  Now he’s the principal cello for the Montreal Symphony Orchestra. Produced by Bill Snyder. Post-Listen Discussion Questions:

Where did Brian Manker grow up?

One Month Left for Students to Enter ‘An Ear for Drama’

You might listen to three podcasts a week, some streaming from a favorite website or others downloaded to your phone… But what entertainment could be found through your headphones before the internet? Enter the RADIO DRAMA! Wikipedia reminds us that radio drama first appeared in the 1920s and quickly rose in popularity. In the 1940s, it was a leading form of popular entertainment for children and adults; and one they often enjoyed together.

Hear Here! | Found Sound

Traditional instruments are not necessary to make music! In this episode: an orchestra who plays vegetables, a professor who builds instruments using found objects, and a pioneer of early electronic music, Delia Derbyshire, who would record a seemingly simple sound and then manipulate that tape to create complex music. Plus, WSKG staffers compose a song, but their only instruments are things they can find on their desks! (Produced by Sarah Gager)

Feeling inspired? Check out these activities for at-home or classroom!

St. Patrick’s Day Classroom Video

You don’t have to be Irish to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, but it is a way to celebrate Irish culture and heritage. Around the world, festivals and parades are held to honor Ireland and the history of St. Patrick. Use this video from PBS LearningMedia to provide an overview of the holiday and open classroom discussion!

Southern Tier Math Conference

Join WSKG at this free conference for PK-12 teachers.  We’ll be featuring resources from our very own Good to Know series and math materials from PBS LearningMedia. Attendees can also learn about the new ‘Text-to-Teacher’ project from Cyberchase! Thursday, March 15, 2018 at Chenango Valley High School in Binghamton, NY. The Conference will run 4:15pm-7:15pm.

Champion

PBS KIDS Presents Free Workshops for Early Learning Educators

Learning with PBS KIDS is a virtual professional development series specially designed with PreK- 1 teachers in mind! With an emphasis on fun, engaging, accessible, and free tools for early childhood classrooms, this series will highlight key themes including the arts, social and emotional learning, playful learning, and meaningful screen time. PBS will provide a certificate of attendance for each 1 hour virtual professional development event. Take advantage of these free events! Learn more and register below:

Learning with PBS KIDS: Exploring Arts & Creativity with Pinkalicious
January 24, 2018  |  7:00-8:00pm ET

Learning with PBS KIDS: Social & Emotional Learning with Daniel Tiger
February 6, 2018 |  7:00-8:00pm ET

Learning with PBS KIDS: Playful Learning with Technology 
February 22, 2018 |  7:00-8:00pm ET

 

PBS Kids Writers Contest

2018 PBS KIDS Writers Contest Opens!

This contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest K-3 Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest Entry Form & Rules

Submissions must be postmarked by April 30, 2018 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton-Durham
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

Free PBS LearningMedia Webinar for Teachers

Join us for an educator webinar (preK-12) from PBS LearningMedia on how to integrate digital tools and public media into your classroom. Expand your digital toolkit and discover how PBS LearningMedia and its collection of over 120K standards-aligned resources can be integrated into meaningful learning experiences for your students. This free webinar will be held online on Tuesday, November 28 | 7:00pm – 8:00pm ET. Register Now!

Spooky Science on PBS Learning Media

Check out this spooky science collection on PBS Learning Media, bringing media into your classroom. Halloween dates back thousands of years to the Celtic people of ancient Europe, who recognized October 31 as the last day of autumn and had festivals to celebrate. This was the time that the regular world and spirit world were thought to be closest, so people wore masks and costumes to fend off roaming ghosts. Over time, the holiday evolved into a secular and community-based event known for activities like trick-or-treating and bobbing for apples that we love today. Halloween is a time to celebrate superstition and changing seasons, and this collection aims to do just that.

Virtual Event for Classrooms Highlights ‘The Vietnam War’

Days before Veterans Day 2017, PBS Teachers, ITVS, National History Day, and WETA present a special virtual event for classrooms featuring filmmaker Lynn Novick of the acclaimed PBS documentary, “The Vietnam War.”

Join us Wednesday, November 8, 2017 as Novick offers an in-depth look at the Vietnam War era through the making of her film, as well as personal, behind-the-scenes insights from her experience working with U.S. and Vietnamese veterans, historians, and everyday people who witnessed the War firsthand. This will be an interactive discussion, so have your questions ready! Register now for this free, live, stream-only online event. http://to.pbs.org/2g8w1V6

AmGrad Day 2017 to Feature Local Teacher

American Graduate Day returns to WSKG TV on Saturday, October 14, 2017 at 2:00pm. American Graduate Day 2017, supported by CPB, is a live, four-hour multi-platform broadcast that focuses on organizations and individuals keeping kids on the path to graduation. WSKG will highlight the amazing dedication and work being done by local educators, our very own American Graduate Champions, including the 2017 PBS Digital Innovator from New York State, Elisabeth Bostwick. https://youtu.be/rVjX4P7oJ2o

Viewers can participate in the event by asking questions and sharing ideas before and during the broadcast on Twitter and Facebook, using the hashtags #AmGrad and #UpstateGrad.

Science Friday #NeatRock Challenge

Science Friday airs on WSQX Fridays 2-4pm

Are you a secret geology groupie? Do you have a rock collection on your window sill, in your garden or under your bed?  We won’t judge you, we have one too. We love rocks! WSKG has such an affinity for them, our Director of Science has a collection on her desk, in her house, and is known to ask her friends to add them to their suitcases when traveling due to her’s being overweight and full of ……wait for it…. rocks.

American Graduate Day 2017

American Graduate Day returns to WSKG TV on Saturday, October 14, 2017 at 2:00pm. American Graduate Day 2017, supported by CPB, is a live, four-hour multi-platform broadcast that focuses on organizations and individuals keeping kids on the path to graduation. The event explores the importance of mentorship through the critical themes of early education, more and better learning, special needs, STEAM, dropout prevention and re-engagement, career readiness, and college completion. WSKG will also highlight the amazing dedication and work being done by local educators, our very own American Graduate Champions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qegt3PGUKrA

Viewers can participate in the event by asking questions and sharing ideas before and during the broadcast on Twitter and Facebook, using the hashtags #AmGrad and #UpstateGrad.

Your Input Needed for New Music Appreciation Series

WSKG is developing a music appreciation series geared toward youth. We are seeking feedback and input from you! Kids, parents, teachers… what do YOU want see covered in a music appreciation radio show/podcast? Please take a moment to take the survey below:

KIDS & PARENTS | take this survey: https://goo.gl/forms/5tss4DQksW4aQVId2

TEACHERS | take this survey: https://goo.gl/forms/knHI2seKAQ5aEAqL2

And…

Smell That? It’s Forensic Entomology At The Body Farm

Science Friday airs weekly on WSQX Fridays 2-4pm

by Jennifer O’Brien, on September 29, 2017

Science Friday offers educational resources for your science classroom.   The following is sample of a lesson plan for 6-12th grade students. Find more information here. 

WARNING Graphic Content: The videos and images below contain graphic documentation of  real life, rotting human and animal corpses that may be disturbing to a younger audience. A forensic scientist enters a crime scene and sees some flies, maggots, and a few beetles on and around a dead body. She immediately begins collecting them.

Climate Conversations: A Series for Middle & High School Educators

Climate Conversations will offer educators tools and resources to teach climate change concepts. PBS LearningMedia is hosting a 3-part virtual professional development series focused around climate change. This series of virtual PD will introduce educators to high-quality, media-based climate change educational materials and allow educators to engage in conversation with scientists, film producers, and other educators. One portion of the series will focus specifically on using the tools in PBS LearningMedia to build a lesson or unit using the materials introduced during the other two events. You must register for each part of the series separately.

Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids

One in five American children has a hard time learning to read. Many of these kids have dyslexia. There are proven ways to help people with dyslexia learn, and a federal law that’s supposed to ensure that schools provide kids with help. But across the country, public schools are denying children proper treatment and often failing to identify them with dyslexia in the first place. This APM Reports documentary investigates why and explores how improving things for dyslexic kids could help all students learn to read better.

Shackled Legacy: Universities and the Slave Trade

A growing number of colleges and universities in the eastern United States are confronting their historic ties to the slave trade. Profits from slavery and related industries helped build some of the most prestigious schools in New England. In many Southern states, enslaved people built and maintained college campuses. This documentary focuses on three universities — Harvard, Georgetown and the University of Virginia — as they grapple with a deeply troubling chapter in their vaunted histories. At the crux of the story is the question of how these institutions might make amends for the ways they participated in American slavery and the moral, political and practical issues under-riding that question.

Keeping Teachers

There may be nothing more important in the educational life of a child than having effective teachers, but U.S. schools are struggling to attract and keep them. The problem is most acute in rural areas, where kids may learn math from a social studies teacher. In urban schools, the teachers most likely to leave are black men, who make up just 2 percent of teachers. This APM Reports documentary tells two separate but connected stories about the teachers these schools desperately need, but can’t hold on to: black men and those willing to work in rural areas. There are surprising similarities in why schools struggle to attract and keep these teachers that are particularly relevant now, when the divides between urban and rural — and white and black — are getting so much attention.

Happy Birthday, Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo was born on this day in 1907. Whether you’re a teacher looking for classroom resources or just a Frida fan – ‘The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo’ is super cool. Check out this video and support materials illustrate what makes art political, and prompts students to create their own self-portraits! Most appropriate for grades: 9-13+. http://to.pbs.org/2tzWm34

What is the Critical Zone?

The Critical Zone supports terrestrial life on Earth. It is the region above and below the Earth surface, extending from the tops of the trees down through the subsurface to the bottom of the groundwater. It is a living, breathing, constantly evolving boundary layer where rock, soil, water, air, and living organisms interact. These complex interactions regulate the natural habitat and determine the availability of life-sustaining resources, including our food production and water quality. Critical Zone scientists work to discover how this living skin is structured, evolves, and provides essential functions that sustain life. The national Critical Zone Observatory Network is made up of nine environmental observatories each located in a different climatic and geologic setting.

Making Sense of Money

In fourth grade, your child will use the four operations to solve word problems involving money. In order to do this, she will first learn to decompose, or break apart, one dollar into smaller units. We call these units: quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies. Ask your child: How many quarters make up one dollar? How many quarters make up two dollars?

Decomposing Fractions

To decompose means to break apart. Your child has already decomposed whole numbers with number bonds, tape diagrams, and place value charts. In fourth grade, he will decompose fractions. Three-eighths is a fraction. We can decompose three-eighths into parts using a tape diagram as the visual model.

Bring Science Friday Into Your Classroom

Science Friday Spoonfuls are doses of current science, technology, and engineering stories ready for the classroom. Each Spoonful contains a short piece of media (article, video, radio interview), a transcript (for video and radio), student questions, and activity suggestions for extending student exploration into the science behind the story. Introduce your students to the circadian rhythm of microbes, the astronomer who pinned down the elusive Planet Nine, or even the researchers who created a 3D-printed glove that can give you different fingerprints! With brand new stories each week, you can find one that aligns to a concept you’re getting ready to teach or you can simply use them to bring more STEM news into the classroom. How do I find Spoonfuls?

Units of Measure

In fourth grade, your child will use the metric system to measure length, mass, and capacity. Length refers to the measurement of something from end to end. Long lengths are called distance. Mass refers to the measure of the amount of matter in an object. Capacity refers to the maximum amount that something can contain, commonly called volume.

One Month Left to Enter Serling Film Fest

The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 26, 2017. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Partial Products

When your child first learns to multiply two two-digit numbers, she will use the area model. This visual tool illustrates how to decompose numbers and find four different products. As her skills improve, she will move from this pictorial model into a concrete method called partial products. Using partial products to solve forty-three times fifty-six, looks like this. She will start by multiplying tens times tens.

Maine-Endwell Students Present 'Positively Social'

Positively Social is a video about digital citizenship and the positive impact that responsible technology use, and social media, have on youth. It is a production of the Maine-Endwell Central School District. https://youtu.be/BTMIryyR-nI

What are your thoughts on this issue? Tweet to our Education Director at @LuckyMamaJ.  

One Week Left to Enter Annual Writing Contest

The PBS KIDS Writers Contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest Entry Form & Rules

Submissions must be postmarked by April 28, 2017 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

Horseheads Teacher Honored by PBS

Join us in offering a big congrats to Elisabeth Bostwick of Garden Road Elementary School in Horseheads, NY, who’s been selected to take part in the 2017 PBS Digital Innovator Program! We’re excited to follow along with Elisabeth and this group of classroom changemakers as they participate in professional development and opportunities to share strategies, empower peers, and inspire students through innovative use of technology and media. CITY | Horseheads, NY

SCHOOL | Gardner Road Elementary

ROLE | Fourth Grade Teacher, Grade Level Chair, Instructional Support Coach

GRADE LEVELS | 3-5

TWITTER | @ElisaBostwick

PBS Digital Innovators are leaders in their schools and their communities, and help improve student learning through their thoughtful use of technology and digital media. The PBS Digital Innovator program helps these educators connect with others who are in the same space by providing tools to guide their leadership and growth, and opportunities to share their ideas in meaningful and transformative ways. Ms. Bostwick will be attending the PBS Digital Innovator Summit and ISTE 2017 Conference & Expo.

Area Model

When first learning to multiply two two-digit numbers your child will use the area model. To start, your child will use her knowledge of place value to decompose into tens and ones. To decompose means to break apart. Let’s decompose these numbers by the value of each digit. The value of two tens is twenty.

Multiplication Fluency

Your child’s introduction to multiplication is through repeated addition. He will draw an array to visualize, or see, five groups of four stars. He will count the stars and find the total. As his understanding improves, he will skip count to find the total more efficiently. Your child will use a variety of visual models, to represent multiplication as he works toward developing multiplication fluency.

Rounding: Nearest 10 or 100

Learning to assess the reasonableness of an answer is an important mathematical skill. It’s your child’s way of seeing if she’s on the right track when problem solving. Sometimes we use rounding to estimate a solution. In third grade, your child will round whole numbers using a vertical number line and round to the nearest ten or to the nearest hundred. Let’s round seven-hundred sixty-two to the nearest hundred.

Climate Change Skeptic Group Seeks to Influence 200,000 Teachers

The Heartland Institute says it will send the book “Why Scientists Disagree About Global Warming” to every public school science teacher in the nation. (Brenna Verre, FRONTLINE)

by Katie Worth, FRONTLINE/Columbia Journalism School Fellowships

Twenty-five thousand science teachers opened their mailboxes this month and found a package from the Heartland Institute, a libertarian think tank that rejects the scientific consensus on climate change. It contained the organization’s book “Why Scientists Disagree About Global Warming,” as well as a DVD rejecting the human role in climate change and arguing instead that rising temperatures have been caused primarily by natural phenomena. The material will be sent to an additional 25,000 teachers every two weeks until every public-school science teacher in the nation has a copy, Heartland president and CEO Joseph Bast said in an interview last week. If so, the campaign would reach more than 200,000 K-12 science teachers.

Solving 2-Step Word Problems

In third grade, your child will solve two-step word problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Let’s try one: There were ten adults and five children at the movies. Each adult ticket costs $8.00 and each child ticket costs $3.00. What is the total cost of all the tickets? What is this question asking us to find?

Use PBS Learning Media in Your Classroom to Discuss Seafood Sustainbility

Check out this PBS Learning Media resource discussing seafood sustainability. Did you know that the decisions we make when ordering seafood can impact the health of the ocean? Asking the right questions can help us make more sustainable choices. This video is part of a larger unit within the California Academy of Sciences’ Flipside Science series: Healthy Oceans

K-12 Students Invited to Submit Short Films to Festival

The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 26, 2017. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Fractions on a Number Line

In third grade, your child will represent fractions in pictures, number bonds, and on a number line. These drawings, or models, allow your child to develop a visual understanding of what fractions really are. Remember, the fraction one-third means that three equal parts make up one whole. How do you represent fractions on a number line? In third grade, your child will begin by placing fractions between zero and one.

Independent Lens | The Bad Kids

Located in an impoverished Mojave Desert community, Black Rock Continuation High School is a last-chance alternative for students who’ve fallen so far behind in credits that they have no hope of earning a diploma at a traditional school. Extraordinary educators believe empathy and life skills, more than academics, give these underserved students command of their own futures. This coming-of-age story watches education combat the crippling effects of poverty in the lives of so-called “bad kids.” Premiering Monday, March 20, 2017 at 10:00pm on WSKG TV. https://youtu.be/0RukXyvLxm8

 

Fractions: Modeling with Number Bonds & Tape Diagrams

When a whole is broken into equal parts each part is a fraction. Each part of this fraction is one-half. Your child will draw tape diagrams as a visual tool to help him break apart one whole. In third grade, your child will break one whole into two equal parts, three equal parts, four equal parts, six equal parts, and eight equal parts. Let’s solve a third grade word problem: Braydon had pizza for lunch.

Annual Writing Contests Await Stories from Youth

The PBS KIDS Writers Contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest Entry Form & Rules

Submissions must be postmarked by April 28, 2017 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

'An Ear for Drama' Seeks Scripts From Student Groups

You might listen to three podcasts a week, some streaming from a favorite website or others downloaded to your phone… But what entertainment could be found through your headphones beforethe internet? Enter the RADIO DRAMA! Wikipedia reminds us that radio drama first appeared in the 1920s and quickly rose in popularity. In the 1940s, it was a leading form of popular entertainment for children and adults; and one they often enjoyed together. The invention of the television stunted this popularity, but radio dramas have continued to be produced over the past 90 years.

Student Films Sought for Annual Serling Festival

The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 26, 2017. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

All About the Holidays | Presidents Day

Presidents Day | All About the Holidays
Presidents Day is an opportunity for the country to acknowledge the leaders of its government. See how it evolved from a birthday party for George Washington to an observance for all of the Presidents. For lesson plans, additional resources, and more teacher support, download our free iBook from the iTunes store: All About the Holidays.

'An Ear for Drama' Project Open to Students

You might listen to three podcasts a week, some streaming from a favorite website or others downloaded to your phone… But what entertainment could be found through your headphones before the internet? Enter the RADIO DRAMA! Wikipedia reminds us that radio drama first appeared in the 1920s and quickly rose in popularity. In the 1940s, it was a leading form of popular entertainment for children and adults; and one they often enjoyed together.

Engaging Youth in Science around the Southern Tier

Are you looking to engage your student in science enrichment programs but not sure where to turn? Here are a few taking place in the next few months:

Invention Convention: Binghamton Imaginink in connection with the Central New York Patent Law Association (CNYPLA) is conducting an invention education program open to all students in grades K-8 in both public and private schools. This program is intended to teach children how to invent and to increase awareness and appreciation of the importance of invention in the United States. To participate in this program, the student is invited to invent a new idea for a device or a new method for doing something. The student is asked to think of a problem they have encountered, or know of, and to come up with an idea for a device or method to solve the problem.

District to Host 'Digital Citizenship Summit EDU'

Maine-Endwell School District is sponsoring the Digital Citizenship Summit, a free event open to students, parents, educators and all members of the community. Learn how students can harness the power of digital technology to make the world a better place. The event will feature keynote speaker, Curran Dee. Curran is a fourth grader and the Chief Kid Officer of DigCitKids, and a TEDxYouth speaker. He created DigCitKids to combat the lack of digital access at his school.

Calling all Classroom Changemakers: Are You a PBS Digital Innovator?

PBS Digital Innovators set the bar for thoughtful tech integration in the classroom. These pre-K-12 educators are not defined by the gadgets they use, but by the unique way they approach education. Their bold and enthusiastic perspective sets them apart as changemakers, and unlocks new worlds for their students. 

What is the PBS Digital Innovator Program? The PBS Digital Innovator program brings together a community of K-12 educators, who are thought-leaders and classroom changemakers, for ongoing professional development and opportunities to share strategies, empower peers and inspire students. Professional Development Opportunity
The PBS Digital Innovator program is a professional development opportunity for highly engaged, changemaker K-12 educators whose innovative use of technology and media create exciting learning experiences for their students.

Chinese New Year Teaching Tools From PBS LearningMedia

Chinese New Year | All About the Holidays
Learn more about the history and traditions behind Chinese New Year, a celebration of good fortune at the end of winter celebrated by Chinese people around the world. How do you celebrate the new year? For lesson plans, additional resources, and more teacher support, download our free iBook from the iTunes store All About the Holidays.  

What Do Youth Have to Say to the Next President?

Letters to the Next President 2.0 engages and connects young people, aged 13–18, as they research, write, and make media to voice their opinions on issues that matter to them in the coming election. While candidates and media concentrated on issues that mattered to voters in the 2016 election season, teachers and students in our nation’s schools will concentrated on issues that matter to the next generation of voters. Check out the national archive of youth voices that contributed to Letters to the Next President. Interested in trying this in your classroom? If your students had 60 seconds to tell the next president of the United States about an issue they care about, what would they say? Note: This lesson plan is adapted from the PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs curriculum.

Local Teacher Center to Host Common Core Parent Night

Have you ever asked yourself what is a number bond or a ten frame? Have you ever thought why this multistep process to solve a math problem is so important? Come spend a night engaging in exactly these discussions. Learn about the strategies being taught as a part of common core math. See how the skills begin in kindergarten and develop step by step, building each year.

Regrouping 100s & 10s to Subtract

You may hear your child and her teacher talk about Place Value Disks. When learning place value, addition, and subtraction, place value disks are a great tool to tie together your child’s understanding before using the standard algorithm. They are especially helpful when regrouping, that is, changing one unit to another unit. Watch this tool in action on a place value chart. Forty-three minus sixteen.

SciGirls Workshop for Educators

Learn how to engage your students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math through PBS Kids SciGirls! SciGirls is a PBS Kids television series out to change how tweens think about science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM! In each episode, join bright, curious real girls in putting STEM to work. Then check out the website to play games, watch episodes, share projects, and connect with other SciGirls in a totally safe social networking environment! SciGirls Trainings integrate inquiry-based STEM instruction with a commitment to gender equity.

Foundation of Multiplication and Division

Your child sets the foundation for understanding multiplication and division in second grade. The first layer in building this foundation is a concrete understanding. He will use objects as counters to create equal groups. Ask your child: Can you make groups of three? Yes!

Youth Media Project for Students

You might listen to three podcasts a week, some streaming from a favorite website or others downloaded to your phone… But what entertainment could be found through your headphones before the internet? Enter the RADIO DRAMA! Wikipedia reminds us that radio drama first appeared in the 1920s and quickly rose in popularity. In the 1940s, it was a leading form of popular entertainment for children and adults; and one they often enjoyed together.

History Behind the New Year Holiday from PBS LearningMedia

New Years Day | All About the Holidays
3, 2, 1, Happy New Year! On January 1st around the world, people celebrate the end of one year and the beginning of the next. Some people make resolutions for the new year or attend parties to celebrate. How do other cultures celebrate the new year? For lesson plans, additional resources, and more teacher support, download our free iBook from the iTunes store All About the Holidays.

SciGirls Workshop for Educators Working with 4-8th Graders

Learn how to engage your students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math through PBS Kids SciGirls! SciGirls is a PBS Kids television series out to change how tweens think about science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM! In each episode, join bright, curious real girls in putting STEM to work. Then check out the website to play games, watch episodes, share projects, and connect with other SciGirls in a totally safe social networking environment! SciGirls Trainings integrate inquiry-based STEM instruction with a commitment to gender equity.

Tape Diagrams: Modeling 2-Digit Addition and Subtraction

Your child continues to use tape diagrams as a visual tool to solve word problems. Now, he solves for an unknown in any position. Here’s a second grade word problem: There are twenty-three students in Miss Nord’s class. Seventeen students are present today. How many students are absent? Let’s draw a tape diagram to see what this problem asks us to find.

Number Forms

Part of using base-ten numbers correctly is understanding how to express the same number in different forms.

Let’s use: 273. This is the base-ten numeral written in standard form. Next, let’s express 273 in unit form. To help, your child may label with a place value chart. Hundreds column, tens column, ones column.

Is Santa Real? (A Scientific Analysis)

Happy Holidays! Ever wonder how Santa could possibly manage to deliver all those presents in a single night? Or what gives red-nosed reindeer the ability to fly? And why do your Christmas lights get tangled in knots no matter how carefully you put the away?! Watch as It’s Okay to Be Smart, a PBS Digital Studios production, uses science to explain these holidays conundrums.

Kwanzaa Teaching Tools From PBS LearningMedia

Kwanzaa | All About the Holidays
Kwanzaa is a time to celebrate African American heritage. Learn the ways people observe this festivity and trace back its roots to ancient African customs.

For lesson plans, additional resources, and more teacher support, download our free iBook from the iTunes store: All About the Holidays.  

Hanukkah Teaching Tools From PBS LearningMedia

Hanukkah | All About the Holidays
Hanukkah is a Jewish celebration, but anyone can find meaning in the holiday. Check out the origins of the tradition, and and how it is observed today. For lesson plans, additional resources, and more teacher support, download our free iBook from the iTunes store: All About the Holidays.  

Christmas Day Teaching Tools From PBS LearningMedia

Christmas | All About the Holidays
Christmas Day isn’t just a holiday for Christians. Learn about the various traditions that people hold to celebrate it. Then have yourself a merry little Christmas! For lesson plans, additional resources, and more teacher support, download our free iBook from the iTunes store: All About the Holidays.  

PRX Education Specials to Air on WSQX Radio

College Choice: the Value of It All (PRX)
Saturday, December 10, 2016 | 10:00am
A long held mantra – that the best investment is a good education – is increasingly being called into question. In that context, NPR’s Robert Siegel set out to learn how nine bright and engaging college students feel now about the choices they made back then. We’ve gathered together the highlights of Robert’s reporting for All Things Considered into a single hour-long narrative, driven by these questions and these students. Stuck at Square One: The Remedial Education Trap (PRX)
Saturday, December 17, 2016 | 10:00am  
When students go to college, they expect to be in college classes. But in fact, 4 in 10 students end up in basic remedial math and English, re-learning what they were supposed to learn in high school.

2017 Rod Serling Film Festival Opens

The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 26, 2017. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

SciGirls Educator Workshop at WSKG Studios in January

Learn how to engage your students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math through PBS Kids SciGirls! SciGirls is a PBS Kids television series out to change how tweens think about science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM! In each episode, join bright, curious real girls in putting STEM to work. Then check out the website to play games, watch episodes, share projects, and connect with other SciGirls in a totally safe social networking environment! SciGirls Trainings integrate inquiry-based STEM instruction with a commitment to gender equity.

Are You Raising a Budding Builder?

We want to hear from families and teachers! Join the #WSKGBuddingBuilders campaign via social media. Take a photo or video of your own child building, creating, making! Upload a drawing or finished project! Share your budding builder and their STEM work with WSKG via Facebook, Instagram,Twitter.

Let’s Make History Together This Thanksgiving

This weekend, you and StoryCorps can preserve the voices and stories of an entire generation of Americans over a single holiday weekend. Open to everyone, The Great Thanksgiving Listen is a national assignment to engage people of all ages in the act of listening. All that is needed to participate is a smartphone and the StoryCorps mobile app.  

Ready to record? Choose someone you love to interview.

Let’s Make History Together This Thanksgiving

This weekend, you and StoryCorps can preserve the voices and stories of an entire generation of Americans over a single holiday weekend. Open to everyone, The Great Thanksgiving Listen is a national assignment to engage people of all ages in the act of listening. All that is needed to participate is a smartphone and the StoryCorps mobile app.  

Ready to record? Choose someone you love to interview.

PBS Hosting ‘Teach Boldly’ Sweepstakes

You bring the passion. They’ll bring the coffee. PBS Education is hosting a super cool sweepstakes just for
teachers! Enter to win monthly prizes of a deluxe coffee maker, PBS Education mugs and a one month supply of coffee for your teacher’s lounge. One grand prize winner will win a complete makeover for your school’s teachers’ lounge. The more times you enter, the more chances to win!

PBS Hosting 'Teach Boldly' Sweepstakes

You bring the passion. They’ll bring the coffee. PBS Education is hosting a super cool sweepstakes just for
teachers! Enter to win monthly prizes of a deluxe coffee maker, PBS Education mugs and a one month supply of coffee for your teacher’s lounge. One grand prize winner will win a complete makeover for your school’s teachers’ lounge. The more times you enter, the more chances to win!

Learn With Bob the Builder: How Much Does It Weigh?

Some objects are heavy and some are light! In this clip from Bob the Builder, Tiny estimates the weight of different objects he lifts with his crane. Watch the clip with your students and then experiment by testing heavy and light items. And don’t forget to share photos or feedback of your students/kids with WSKG using hashtag #WSKGBuddingBuilders! Frame the Viewing: 

Show the students two different objects. Have them predict which one weighs more.

Don’t Underestimate the Power of an Informal Education Experience

WSKG sat down with Binghamton, NY native Liam Walsh, student filmmaker, to reflect on his experience with the Rod Serling Film Festival. His high school teacher, Mr. Keith Rosko, also talked with us. Walsh took the ‘Best in Show’ award in the 2016 Festival and has since moved on to college. The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival will open in January. https://youtu.be/iOBmEXSWWAk?t=1m45s

Don't Underestimate the Power of an Informal Education Experience

WSKG sat down with Binghamton, NY native Liam Walsh, student filmmaker, to reflect on his experience with the Rod Serling Film Festival. His high school teacher, Mr. Keith Rosko, also talked with us. Walsh took the ‘Best in Show’ award in the 2016 Festival and has since moved on to college. The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival will open in January. https://youtu.be/iOBmEXSWWAk?t=1m45s

Collection of PBS Resources Help Students Navigate the Election Season

Presenting You Choose 2016 from PBS KIDS Digital, which introduces kids to non-partisan, democracy-related topics through interactive exploration and video. Kids can create their own campaign posters about  anything they care about, collect presidential trading cards of past U.S. Presidents and First Ladies and watch videos that focus on important issues relevant to them! PBS KIDS Digital has also curated a “Get to Know a President a Day” YouTube playlist to lead up to the election with content from LearningMedia. The video clips provide an overview about each President of the United States in just 60 seconds. PBS Education has created Election Central featuring tools, resources and creative solutions to educate your students on the various facets of the political process.

Bring ‘Hamilton’ Into Your Classroom

GREAT PERFORMANCES: “Hamilton’s America” provides a behind-the-scenes look at Lin-Manuel
Miranda’s smash hit Broadway musical Hamilton. “Hamilton’s America” blends history, footage of Miranda’s writing process, and scenes from the musical itself to create a vibrant and engaging film about the making of the musical and the preservation of Alexander Hamilton’s legacy. PBS LearningMedia now features this collection for the classroom, which includes clips, activities, discussion questions, handouts, and teaching tips connected to the film. 

Also – check out this project! Dust off your mic and join in on the #fallartsrap challenge that is inspired by “Hamilton’s America!” Learn more.  

Bring 'Hamilton' Into Your Classroom

GREAT PERFORMANCES: “Hamilton’s America” provides a behind-the-scenes look at Lin-Manuel
Miranda’s smash hit Broadway musical Hamilton. “Hamilton’s America” blends history, footage of Miranda’s writing process, and scenes from the musical itself to create a vibrant and engaging film about the making of the musical and the preservation of Alexander Hamilton’s legacy. PBS LearningMedia now features this collection for the classroom, which includes clips, activities, discussion questions, handouts, and teaching tips connected to the film. 

Also – check out this project! Dust off your mic and join in on the #fallartsrap challenge that is inspired by “Hamilton’s America!” Learn more.  

Free Teacher Webinar Preps Classrooms for 2016 ‘The Great Thanksgiving Listen’

If you are a regular listener to WSKG you’re probably familiar with StoryCorps from their weekly broadcasts on NPR’s Morning Edition. The organization started collecting stories in 2003 and every interview is archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. The interviews represent one of the largest oral history projects of its kind and offer people a unique look at many fascinating and important aspects of American life. StoryCorps features an ambitious oral history project called “The Great Thanksgiving Listen.” The goal is to capture the stories and voices of an entire generation by having students from across the country interview a grandparent or elder over the Thanksgiving holiday. Educators interested in participating can learn more and register for the official toolkit here.

Free Teacher Webinar Preps Classrooms for 2016 'The Great Thanksgiving Listen'

If you are a regular listener to WSKG you’re probably familiar with StoryCorps from their weekly broadcasts on NPR’s Morning Edition. The organization started collecting stories in 2003 and every interview is archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. The interviews represent one of the largest oral history projects of its kind and offer people a unique look at many fascinating and important aspects of American life. StoryCorps features an ambitious oral history project called “The Great Thanksgiving Listen.” The goal is to capture the stories and voices of an entire generation by having students from across the country interview a grandparent or elder over the Thanksgiving holiday. Educators interested in participating can learn more and register for the official toolkit here.

Explore the World of Chemistry with NOVA: Hunting the Elements

Looking for resources for your class?  Where do nature’s building blocks, called the elements, come from? Elements are the hidden ingredients of everything in our world, from the carbon in our bodies to the metals in our smartphone. To unlock their secrets, NOVA’s Hunting the Elements spins viewers through the world of weird, extreme chemistry: the strongest acids, the deadliest poisons, and the universe’s most abundant- and rarest- elements. This collection will allow you and your students to explore this fascinating chemical landscape and take a tour across the periodic table.

'American Graduate Day' Returns for 2016

American Graduate Day returns to WSKG TV on Saturday, September 17, 2016 at 2:00pm. American Graduate Day 2016 supported by CPB, is a live, four-hour multiplatform broadcast that focuses on organizations and individuals keeping kids on the path to graduation. The event explores the importance of mentorship through the critical themes of early education, more and better learning, special needs, STEAM, dropout prevention and re-engagement, career readiness, and college completion. WSKG will also highlight the amazing dedication and work being done by local educators, our very own American Graduate Champions. https://youtu.be/PfjWKq6DGpI

 

Viewers can participate in the event by asking questions and sharing ideas before and during the broadcast on Twitter and Facebook, using the hashtags #AmGrad and #UpstateGrad.

Alfred U Artist and Professor Featured in Season Premiere of 'Craft in America'

Spotlight Education week continues with the season premiere of Craft in America. TEACHERS highlights artists committed to sharing the skills and passion for craft with students of all ages. Featuring Navajo weavers Barbara Teller Ornelas and Lynda Teller Pete at Idyllwild Arts, glass artist Mark Mitsuda at Punahou School, glass artist Therman Statom, and ceramic artist Linda Sikora at Alfred University School of Art and Design. WSKG’s Crystal Sarakas interviewed Linda Sikora for our Artist Cafe program. Ms. Sikora also adds:
Individuals should contact Alfred University to learn about professional studies in Visual Art and for more information about Ceramic art. To see some of the best functional ceramics in the country locally, attend the national ceramics Flower City Pottery Invitational in Rochester, NY on October 14, 15, and 16, 2016. This is held at the Genesee Center for the Arts and Education.

School of the Future

NOVA School of the Future airs on WSKG TV September 14, 2016 at 9pm. In a new age of information, rapid innovation, and globalization, how can we prepare our children to compete? Once the envy of the world, American schools are now in trouble. How can the latest research help us fix education in America? Can the science of learning—including new insights from neuroscientists, psychologists, and educators—reveal how kids’ brains work and tell us which techniques are most likely to engage and inspire growing minds?

'Frontline' Presents Updates to Two Films During 'Spotlight Education' Week

In a one-hour special FRONTLINE presents two films on education in America. First: In “A Subprime Education,” we return to the story of for-profit colleges — which FRONTLINE first examined in the 2010 film “College Inc.” — to investigate allegations of fraud and predatory behavior in the troubled industry, and the collapse of Corinthian Colleges. Then, “The Education of Omarina” updates a story FRONTLINE has been following since 2012 — showing how an innovative program to stem the high school dropout crisis has affected one girl’s journey, from a public middle school in the Bronx to an elite New England private school, and now on to college. This two-part hour airs as part of PBS’s “Spotlight Education,” a week of primetime programming focused on the challenges facing America’s education system.  Watch on WSKG TV Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at 9:00pm.

Film Follows Two Teens Over Course of Five Years in 'All the Difference'

The largely invisible and often crushing struggles of young African-American men come vividly — and heroically — to life in All the Difference, which traces the paths of two teens from the South Side of Chicago who dream of graduating from college. Statistics predict that Robert and Krishaun will drop out of high school, but they have other plans. Oscar®-nominated producer/director Tod Lending’s intimate film, executive produced by author Wes Moore, follows the young men through five years of hard work, sacrifice, setbacks and uncertainty. As they discover, support from family, teachers and mentors makes all the difference in defying the odds. Airs on WSKG TV Monday, September 12, 2016 at 10:00pm as part of the PBS Spotlight Education week of special programming.

Honoring Education Through 'PBS Spotlight Education' Week

Spotlight Education is a week of primetime programming airing on WSKG from September 12, 2016 through September 17, 2016.. It features films and documentaries, including special episodes of NOVA, FRONTLINE and PBS NEWSHOUR, a new documentary from POV, and the premiere of TED TALKS, “The Education Revolution.” It concludes with the 5th annual AMERICAN GRADUATE DAY, a broadcast about individuals and non-profit organizations dedicated to helping youth stay on track to high school graduation. This collection features resources about intervention and success strategies, 21st Century learners, and examines how the dedication to teaching all children, especially at-risk students, makes a real difference in communities. New resources will be added to reflect the programming. Spotlight Education celebrates the work of teachers and educators and underscores the importance of convening a dialogue around education.

Teachers Invited to Free Back-to-School Event

WSKG invites teachers into our Studios for a Back-to-School themed Open House.  We’re opening our doors on Monday, August 29, 2016 from 9:00am-noon and Tuesday, August 30, 2016 from 1:00pm-3:00pm.  Meet with our Youth Focused and Science staff as we share the best educational content from WSKG and PBS! Fill your bag with classroom toolkits, bring your own device for on-site PBS LearningMedia training and app downloads, be the first to preview brand-new programs set to air during September’s PBS Spotlight Education week, and enjoy a cup of delicious coffee from our friends at Tom’s Coffee, Cards & Gifts and fresh-made doughnuts from the good folks at the Cider Mill. Be sure to visit our next door neighbor, The Teacher Center of Broome County, to help get your classroom ready with posters, Ellison die-cuts, laminating, and more!

Online Professional Development from PBS LearningMedia

Looking to bring innovative lessons to your new students in September? Check out these free, media-rich professional development webinars for educators from PBS LearningMedia.  
Media-Based ELA Resources on PBS LearningMedia
Do you teach Romeo and Juliet, The Diary of Anne Frank, Great Expectations, and other classics? Discover how accessing classroom-ready videos and teaching tips from PBS can enhance media literacy while illuminating great works of literature and their creators. Register now!

Learning about the Summer Solstice

What is the summer solstice and how can I share this with my child? The summer solstice will take place June 20, 2016 at approximately 6:34pm EDT, in the Southern Tier of New York. This marks the longest length of daylight in the Northern Hemisphere. Check out this video from PBS Learning Media and share with your K-5th grade child explaining how the earth revolves around the sun on it’s axis, creating the seasons and solstice.

Memorial Day Video & Free iBook from PBS LearningMedia

Help celebrate and explain the origin of Memorial Day with your kids through this quick video from PBSLearningMedia’s ‘All About the Holidays’ series.  And teachers — be sure to download the free ‘All About the Holidays’ iBook from iTunes. This book brings together lesson plans with an abundance of brief, in-class activities around 61 holidays and special events celebrated in the United States and around the globe. The lesson plans in this book are built around PBS LearningMedia’s video series ‘All About the Holidays.’ https://youtu.be/VKDEruS_-3o?list=PLG6dQWzaO45n7NVJ7HjQAkwqITj6HEWAh

StoryCorps in the Classroom

Our education helps to develop who we are and what we will become. StoryCorps knows that this path is made brighter when we stop and listen to each other. As we end another school year, StoryCorps encourages you to learn more about the students in your life. In classrooms across America, students work with StoryCorps and to become the best version of themselves through listening and engaging with their family, loved ones, and peers. Cross-disciplinary (language arts, media, history) for Grades 9 and 10
Over the past five years, StoryCorps has been working in classrooms throughout America with a high school youth development curriculum called StoryCorpsU (SCU).

Last Call for Entries to the 'Rod Serling Film Fest'

The 2016 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 27, 2016. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Education Specials Explore Math Corps and Charter Schools

It All Adds Up from American Public Television
IT ALL ADDS UP profiles the teachers and students of Wayne State University’s Math Corps, a groundbreaking organization that partners struggling middle and high-school students from Detroit’s public schools with collegians, who help teach vital math and life skills the kids need to succeed. After 16 years, the program’s results speak volumes: more than 90 percent of Math Corps’ students graduate from high school and more than 80 percent attend college. Produced by Academy Award-winning director Sue Marx, the documentary features engaging and heart-warming interviews with alumni and current campers who testify to the life-changing impact of the Math Corps. Watch Saturday, May 14, 2016 at 6:00am on WSKG-TV

 

 
Outside The Box from American Public Television
Amid controversy, charter schools – free public schools funded by tax dollars – first opened in the United States 20 years ago, largely in response to low graduation rates and the failure of schools to better prepare students for higher education and the job market. Today, charter schools make up an increasing percentage of the U.S. educational landscape, with approximately 5,000 schools in 41 states.

Winning Entry of 'An Ear for Drama' Radio Contest Announced

WSKG is pleased is to announce that ‘The Spelling Bee’ has been selected as the winning script for our inaugural radio drama contest. This entry was submitted by students from Jennie F. Snapp Middle School of the Union-Endicott School District.  Join us in congratulating the following individuals:

Teacher Robert Rarrick and students Brianna Attey, Janaya Brown, Rayna Doing, Derick Donato, John Knapp, L.J. Shabazz, Erica Smart, Michael Tye, Abigail Winans, Vishal Yalamanchili. We’ll be in pre-production and production this spring and ‘The Spelling Bee’ will be airing on WSKG Radio during summer 2016. Our Judging Committee was impressed with all of the entries and we will soon be sending feedback to every participant.

Global Big Day

Prairie Warbler by Greg Gard

Global Big Day is a single day uniting birdwatchers worldwide across political boundaries and language barriers, all brought together by the shared passion for birds. Global Big Day takes place on May 14, 2016, is easy to participate in and helps scientists learn about bird populations and migration patterns. Submit Your Data to eBird on May 14
It’s that simple. If you submit your birds to eBird they count. Learn how to take part.

Explore the Intricate Life of a Tree using PBS Learning Media

PBS Learning Media is a wealth of digital resources for educators to bring 21st century skills into the classroom. Help students appreciate the critical role trees play in sustaining life on Earth with this interactive from the National Arbor Day Foundation. Did you know that a tree’s rings can provide a record of the environmental factors that affected its growth and life cycle? The trunk of a tree functions as both a supporting structure and a pathway, transporting food down from the leaves through photosynthesis and conducting water and minerals up from the roots. View Interactive

In this interactive activity adapted from the National Arbor Day Foundation, explore the intricate life of a tree.

Final Call for Entries to the 'PBS KIDS Writers Contest'

This contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest (4-6) Entry Form & Flyer

Submissions must be postmarked by April 29, 2016 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

Youth Film Festival Seeks Entries

The 2016 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 27, 2016. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Budding Authors and Artists Encouraged to Participate in the 'PBS KIDS Writers Contest'

This contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest (4-6) Entry Form & Flyer

Submissions must be postmarked by April 29, 2016 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

Celebrate the Outdoors with 'Cyberchase' Activities

WSKG celebrates the environment with Cyberchase!  Our Cyberchase pick of the week is this online collection of nature-themed activities that are low-cost/no-cost and easy to replicate at home or in the classroom. Topics include wind power, temperature, recycling, fog, ecosystems, and more.  Cyberchase airs on WSKG TV Fridays at 5:30pm and Saturday & Sunday at 10:30am.  Tune in to support math and environmental lessons.

Follow First Generation College Students in 'Why Not Us?'

Follow the journeys of four young people—all first in their families to go to college—as they road-trip across the country to interview inspiring individuals who were also first in their families to pursue higher education. After gaining wisdom and guidance from trail-blazing leaders—including Anna Maria Chávez, CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA, Grammy Award-winner John Legend, and Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz—the Roadtrippers are emboldened to embrace the opportunities ahead and ask “why shouldn’t I succeed?”
Watch on WSKG TV March 26, 2016 at 5:30am.  Check out a preview of the program:

2016 PBS KIDS Writers Contest

This contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest (4-6) Entry Form & Flyer

Submissions must be postmarked by April 29, 2016 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

'Connect NY' Discusses Issues Surrounding the Achievement Gap

The Connect: NY series explores statewide issues of critical importance with monthly, one-hour panel discussions about education issues including: Common Core standards, teacher evaluation, school financing, achievement gaps, testing and opting out, and legal challenges. This episode focuses on the funding of New York’s schools. We visit a school in the Utica Central School District and speak with its superintendent as well as teachers. The program will also focus on the methods our state uses to finance education. Guests who will join State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia and host Susan Arbetter include:

Rochester School Board President Van Henri White
Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs professor John Yinger
Buffalo City School District Superintendent Kriner Cash

The show aims to give stakeholders across New York State a better understanding of education issues.

'Is School Enough?' Provokes Thinking of New Modes of Education

Is School Enough? documents vivid examples of where new modes of learning and engagement are taking hold and flourishing. Featuring nationally recognized educators and researchers, Stephen Brown’s powerful stories show that when students have the opportunity to explore real interests and problems, they step up and perform at the highest level. This new approach reaches motivated students as well as kids that educators call “the bright and bored,” helping these learners tune in rather than drop out. Is School Enough?

Free Webinars from Sesame Street Focus on Autism

Join your friends on Sesame Street for a one-hour webinar just for educators on the Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children initiative! Every child in his or her lifetime will meet someone who has autism—and this project was developed to spread a message of respect, empathy, and kindness to all children, and to remind us all that everyone has unique qualities and talents that make the world an interesting place. In this interactive discussion, you’ll learn more from the creators of this project about the variety of free resources that were developed, and ways these materials can be integrated into programming with children. Register today! Webinar for Providers Working With Families and Children
Wednesday, March 16, 2016 | 2:00pm-3:00pm
Register Here

Webinar for Educators Working With Children
Wednesday, March 23, 2016 | 3:00pm-4:00pm
Register Here

 

'School Sleuth' Investigates Tech in the Classroom

Our world is increasingly wired to, and driven by, technology. Our homes, our entertainment, cars, hospitals, marketplaces, even our wallets are now technologically “smart,” but how about our children’s classrooms and their teachers? Do students have access to today’s best software and latest systems? Are teachers and schools keeping up, or are they overwhelmed by the choices? Can technology and traditional teaching methods co-exist in a new blended learning environment?

Time to Enter our Annual 'PBS KIDS Writers Contest'

This contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest (4-6) Entry Form & Flyer

Submissions must be postmarked by April 29, 2016 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

'Cyberchase' Episode is a Lesson in Math and the Environment

WSKG loves learning about math and the environment with Cyberchase!  Our Cyberchase pick of the week is the episode ‘Bottled Up’ and you can watch it here:

Episode Description
Radsters are an active bunch, but they have a big problem: water bottles. Way Cool Arena has been turned into a bottle dump, and the beloved skate park is next! The kids and Slider must find a way to get rid of the heaps of empties and reduce future waste while making sure Radsters stay healthy. For Real segment: While visiting his friend at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Harry learns about sustainability, like recycling fabrics in clothes to reducing plastic waste by using reusable water bottles.

'Read Across America' 2016 Arrives

Every year, on March 2nd, the National Education Association (NEA) celebrates Dr. Seuss’s Birthday as Read Across America Day. We’ve assembled a few online resources to help you celebrate Seuss-style and to encourage families to read together. Dr. Seuss Crafts Roundup from PBS Parents features adorable, low-cost craft ideas for the early learner! Are you a busy parent and short on time? PBS KIDS has compiled this online Reading Activity Calendar full of simple, easy ideas for you to incorporate at home! Co-watch The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!  on WSKG TV (Monday-Friday at 1:30pm) and follow up with an online game.

'Science Friday' Seeking Educators for Collaborations

For 25 years, Science Friday has been producing award-winning multimedia for web, radio, YouTube, and social media. By reaching millions of people and working with a growing network of scientists and innovators—including Nobel laureates, MacArthur geniuses, Pulitzer Prize winners, and world-famous explorers—we aim to promote a greater understanding of science and technology in the general public. We need your help! 

Educators like you are our allies in communicating the value of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to the general public. We think that by working together, we can combine powerful media and innovative education practices to inspire students to pursue careers in discovery and innovation. The Science Friday Initiative is conducting a nationwide search for creative, highly motivated, and dedicated STEM educators to participate in the collaborative development of new multimedia-driven education resources.

Annual 'PBS KIDS Writers Contest' Seeks Stories

This contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest (4-6) Entry Form & Flyer

Submissions must be postmarked by April 29, 2016 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

Opportunity for Youth Filmmakers

The 2016 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 27, 2016. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Live Stream 'Civil Rights Today' in Your Classroom

Electronic Field Trip: Lessons from the American Civil Rights Movement
Join New York Times best-selling author and youth advocate Wes Moore as he leads a special youth town hall discussion about race, racism, and other issues of equality. Streaming live on Thursday, February 25, 2016 from 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Throughout 2015, events across the nation focused attention on concerns in minority communities and racial perceptions in America, resulting in renewed public dialogue about race relations and other issues of social justice. This ongoing dialogue includes not only questions about the policing of black communities, but also educational inequality and the school-to-prison pipeline, the LGBTQ rights movement, immigration reform, and the rebuilding of our communities. This field trip is brought to you by Alabama Public Television and American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen.  
Register for Episode Seven, Civil Rights Today.  

 
Webinar: Illuminating Social Justice Issues Through Authentic Student Projects
Join PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovator Michael Hernandez as he explores how teachers of all grade levels can design meaningful social justice projects.

Last Chance to Support Youth Through the Newman's Own Foundation's Matching Gift Campaign

WSKG is pleased to be the recipient of a $5,000 challenge grant from Newman’s Own Foundation.  This grant helps WSKG bring you award winning educational programming and supports projects such as American Graduate and Youth Voice – programs that help local youth see the value of education and stay on track to graduation.  For the month of February only, your contribution to WSKG’s youth programs will be matched dollar for dollar, up to $5,000, by the Newman’s Own Foundation.  Please help us meet this challenge!  

Newman’s Own Foundation has been supporting public media for 32 years — since 1983.

Young Writers are Invited to Enter the 2016 'PBS KIDS Writers Contest'

This contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest (4-6) Entry Form & Flyer

Submissions must be postmarked by April 29, 2016 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

Southern Tier Math Conference

Join WSKG at this free conference for PK-12 teachers.  We’ll be featuring resources from Cyberchase, our very own Good to Know series, and PBS LearningMedia. Sessions include math workstations, Math & Movement, Transformational Geometry, Flipped Classroom, Math and Computer Science, MIND Research Institute, Texas Instruments, and more!  The conference is sponsored by Broome-Tioga BOCES and the Broome County Teacher Center.  Click here for more information.

Philosophy and Children?

Philosophy is not usually part of a second-grade curriculum, yet this documentary accompanies a group of college students who lead a series of philosophy classes for six- and seven-year-olds.  The second graders learn some of the basic rules for having a philosophical discussion, from what it means to be a respectful listener who respects differences in opinion, to how to build a good argument when making a point. These young students are excited to be asked not only what they think, but why. https://youtu.be/25czwRKsFeM

This film documents classes conducted at Martin Luther King Charter School by Mount Holyoke College students under the guidance of Philosophy Professor Thomas Wartenberg and President Lynn Pasquerella. The goal of Wartenberg and Pasquerella’s unique class is to give children an opportunity to pursue their natural curiosity and inclination for philosophy. In their curriculum, picture books become catalysts for philosophical discussion and an effective way to foster critical thinking skills as well as a lifelong love of reading.

Connect: NY | Funding

The Connect: NY series explores statewide issues of critical importance with monthly, one-hour panel discussions about education issues including: Common Core standards, teacher evaluation, school financing, achievement gaps, testing and opting out, and legal challenges. This episode focuses on the funding of New York’s schools. We visit a school in the Utica Central School District and speak with its superintendent as well as teachers. The program will also focus on the methods our state uses to finance education. Guests who will join State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia and host Susan Arbetter include:

Dr. Rick Timbs is Executive Director of the Statewide School Finance consortium
Andy Pallotta is Executive Vice President of New York State United Teachers
Michelle Brantner is the Superintendent of the Moravia Central Schools in upstate New York
Suzanne Slack, Chief Financial Officer of the Syracuse City School District
David Flatley is the Superintendent of the Carle Place School District on Long Island

The show aims to give stakeholders across New York State a better understanding of education issues.

Civil Rights for the Classroom: Then & Now

While some consider the Civil Rights Movement part of the distant past, many of the problems that fueled the fight are still with us. PBS LearningMedia helps to lend context to the events and leaders that defined the Civil Rights movement’s first three decades (1954-1985). The resources also capture the issues and activists involved in the struggle today – those making headlines, stirring debate, and trending on social media. The collection features content from PBS programs including Eyes on the Prize and Freedom Riders. View Full Collection

 

 

Here’s a preview of the type of resources and videos available in this collection:
Civil Rights: Then

Civil Rights: Now

Browse WSKG’s special programs for Black History Month.

American Graduate Champion | Lonna Pierce

WSKG Public Media is proud to profile local teaching librarian and American Graduate Champion Lonna Pierce. Lonna started the Eleanor Henricks Countywide Poetry Recitation for Children, which celebrates young poets from throughout Broome County. A quarter of a century later she is still running the program and enriching the lives of many children. https://youtu.be/Qye8oNUzmsI

Who’s the champion in your life? Follow the American Graduate movement!

All About the Holidays | Groundhog Day

Are we in for 6 more weeks of winter? We will find out on February 2! Teach early learners about Groundhog Day with PBS LearningMedia’s collection of K-3 resources related to Punxsutawney Phil and the science behind our changing seasons. Featuring videos, puzzles, and storyboards! Augment your classroom lessons with this festive collection of resources.

National Mentoring Month Continues

A mentor is defined as “someone who teaches, gives help and advice to… often a younger person.”  Public media calls them #AmGrad Champions.  See some of the mentors making a difference in the lives of youth across the country when you visit the American Graduate website! WSKG highlights local mentors and champions here:

Share your mentor story with us at @WSKG using the hashtag #UpstateGrad!

New Collection: PBS World Explorers

Some sailed across the Atlantic, others rocketed to the moon. Learn more about the lives and journeys of some of history’s greatest explorers with this new collection. PBS LearningMedia is excited to announce the newest collection: PBS World Explorers. We hope this collection helps you to inspire a spirit of curiosity and adventure in your students during the new year. Highlights from World Explorers Collection

 

 

Browse full World Explorer Collection
 

Bee a Detective and Discover the Culprit Behind Declining Bee Populations

photo: Nancy Coddington

Did you know that about a third of the U.S. diet comes from foods that involve pollination by honey bees? Since bees provide vital benefits to people, including crop pollination, and products such as honey and beeswax, the loss of bee colonies through colony collapse disorder (CCD) is a serious concern. In this lesson plan from The Nature Conservancy, students learn about the features of a honeybee colony and the potential causes of CCD. The activity puts students at the cutting edge of scientific research because to date, CCD has not been reliably attributed to any single cause. By the end of the lesson, students should understand that in nature, simple cause/effect relationships may not explain all of our observations.

Celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day with PBS

PBS LearningMedia has a number of collections around some of the most significant pieces of history, including the March on Washington where Dr. King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech.  Learn about all of the resources here. In 2013, WSKG interviewed Ithaca, NY resident Dorothy Cotton, a leader of the SCLC in the 1960s.  She discusses what it was like to attend an activist training run by the group during the civil rights movements. On the first day, she says between 50 and 60 attendees sang “sorrow songs” of their shared experiences and struggles.

National Mentoring Month

In the report from America’s Promise Alliance “Don’t Quit On Me,” a key finding of the report shows: “A relationship with one stable, trusted person or anchor allows young people to access available community assets and leverage internal strengths.” Become a mentor that a young person can trust.  Learn more about National Mentoring Month here! https://youtu.be/vpFG6mNAkAc

WSKG wants to hear from students – who or what is a driving force in your life?  Tell us about someone who has mentored you in our Who’s Your Champion?

Calling all youth filmmakers! Rod Serling Film Festival opens for 2016

The 2016 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 27, 2016. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Independent Lens: East of Salinas

East of Salinas takes us to the heart of California’s “Steinbeck Country,” the Salinas Valley, to meet a bright boy and his dedicated teacher — both sons of migrant farm workers. With parents who are busy working long hours in the fields, third grader Jose Ansaldo often turns to his teacher, Oscar Ramos, for guidance. But Jose is undocumented; he was born in Mexico,. Like many other migrant children, he is beginning to understand the situation— and the opportunities that may be lost to him through no fault of his own. East of Salinas follows Jose and Oscar over three years: the boy is full of energy, smarts, and potential, while his teacher is determined to give back to a new generation of migrant children.

Independent Lens: The Homestretch

The Homestretch follows three homeless teens as they fight to stay in school, graduate, and create a new life. Each of these smart, ambitious youths — Roque, Kasey, and Anthony — will surprise, inspire, and challenge audiences to rethink stereotypes of homelessness as they work to complete their educations while facing the trauma of being alone and abandoned at an early age. While told through a personal perspective, their stories connect with larger issues of poverty, race, juvenile justice, immigration, foster care, and LGBTQ rights. With unprecedented access into Chicago public schools, The Night Ministry “Crib” emergency youth shelter, and Teen Living Programs’ Belfort House, The Homestretchfollows these kids as they move through the milestones of high school while navigating a landscape of couch hopping, emergency shelters, transitional homes, street families, and a school system on the front lines of the homelessness crisis. The Homestretch examines the struggles these young people face in obtaining a high school level education, and then follows them beyond graduation to focus on the crucial transition when the structure of school vanishes, and homeless youth often struggle to find the support and community they need to survive and be independent.

Testing, Opting-Out and Parental Engagement

The Connect New York series explores statewide issues of critical importance with monthly, one-hour panel discussions about education issues including: Common Core standards, teacher evaluation, school financing, achievement gaps, testing and opting out, and legal challenges. This episode focuses on testing, opting out and parental engagement in New York’s schools. We visit a school in the Elmira Heights School District and speak with its superintendent as well as teachers and parents. The program will focus on the response by the families of 240,000 New York students who opted out of the state administered exams in 2015 and the recently announced changes by the state and federal education departments. Susan Arbetter, host of “The Capitol Pressroom” serves as show host, and moderates a panel conversation with NYS Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia.

Ted Talks Education

Public television and TED, the non-profit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading, share a deep commitment to addressing the high school dropout crisis. The TED Talks Education one-hour program brings together a diverse group of teachers and education advocates delivering short, high-impact talks on the theme of teaching and learning. These original TED Talks are given by thought leaders including Geoffrey Canada, Bill Gates, Rita F. Pierson, Dr. Angela Lee Duckworth and Sir Ken Robinson. TED Talks Education is part of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting’s American Graduate initiative. See all speakers and performers and check out this powerful excerpt:

Watch the full hour-long program on WSKG TV on December 19th at 5:30am.

PBS is looking for America's Most Innovative Educators!

Are you passionate about using technology to create new learning opportunities? Do you enjoy collaborating with other educators to spark student interest in learning? Are you an active sharer of content and ideas through social media? Apply for a chance to become a PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovator! Who:
Tech-savvy K-12 educators

What:
The Digital Innovators program recognizes educators who incorporate digital media in the classroom to inspire student learning.

The State of Nuclear Power, Climate Refugees, and Bad News for Bananas

Some of this year’s picks. Photo by Brandon Echter
This episode of Science Friday will air on December 11, 2015 on WSQX from 2-4pm. Freelance journalist and author Maggie Koerth-Baker returns to Science Friday to discuss the state of nuclear power around the world—a topic she tackles at length in a recent New York Times article. Countries like Japan and Germany are looking to phase out nuclear energy, and even the United States, which largely embraces it, hasn’t opened a nuclear reactor since 1996. Koerth-Baker also shares other short subjects in science this week, including a story about how the first climate refugees in the continental United States may hail from an island in the Chesapeake Bay.

180 Days: Hartsville

Experience a year of a Southern town’s efforts to address the urgent demand for reform in American public schools, and watch what happens when the systems that can either fuel or diffuse that reform — bureaucracy, economic opportunity and fixed mindsets — interact and intersect. https://youtu.be/UFXQcGLjgOs
Watch episode 1 on December 5th at 5:30am and episode 2 on December 12th at 5:30am on WSKG TV.

Cyberchase: Step It Up!

The 10th season of Cyberchase is here and it’s all about math and health! Have you seen the new educator resources available? Research has linked physical activity levels in children with physical and emotional health benefits, as well as academic benefits like improved cognitive performance and on-task behavior. Cyberchase: Step It Up! aims to inspire kids and educators to find small opportunities to work more steps into their regular day while enjoying the opportunity to learn related math. Over the course of five weeks, kids will add up to 400 more steps per day – for a total of more than 5,000 added steps.

WSKG ASKS: Who's Your Champion?

As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we want to hear about the person, place, program, or support that is helping you be successful in school. Introduce us to your champion! (Submit your own stories in the form below.)

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! Recent graduates are also welcome! If you could have held the microphone on graduation day, who is the person you would most like to thank?

Race to Nowhere

Featuring the heartbreaking stories of students across the country who have been pushed to the brink by over-scheduling, over-testing and the relentless pressure to achieve, Race to Nowhere points to a silent epidemic in our schools. Through the testimony of educators, parents and education experts, it reveals an education system in which cheating has become commonplace; students have become disengaged; stress-related illness, depression and burnout are rampant; and young people arrive at college and the workplace unprepared and uninspired. Shown nationwide and internationally in more than 7,000 schools, universities, cinemas, hospitals, corporations and community centers, “Race to Nowhere” has become the centerpiece of a nationwide, grassroots movement for the transformation of education. Watch on WSKG TV November 28th at 5:30am. https://youtu.be/Uem73imvn9Y

 

Get Your Tech On!

We live – and learn – in a high tech world, and as such, education must continually evolve. Hear about some of those new models of 21st century learning from experts in the education field in this video from PBS LearningMedia. The video features Chris Rush from New Classrooms, who discusses the value in integrating games into the educational space. We also hear from Teresa Napoli from School of One, who shares thoughts on personalized instruction for students, who in this day and age learn at different rates and by different methods. Plus, Rebecca Rufo-Tepper from the Institute of Play shares her vision for how to use games and digital media in meaningful and purposeful ways in the classroom.

NYS Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia discusses receivership on 'Connect: NY'

This series explores statewide issues of critical importance with monthly, one-hour panel discussions about education issues including: Common Core standards, teacher evaluation, school financing, achievement gaps, testing and opting out, and legal challenges. Susan Arbetter, host of “The Capitol Pressroom” serves as show host, and moderates a panel conversation with NYS Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia. The show aims to give stakeholders across New York State a better understanding of education issues.  Connect: NY is produced by WCNY (Syracuse, NY), and WSKG TV will air this education series throughout 2015-2016. Preview the show, airing on November 12 at 8:00 p.m.

How Does Government Affect Me?

PBS KIDS presents The Democracy Project, an online collection that helps kids understand government and how it functions.  What is government and what role does it play in our lives? Why do we need government? In its simplest form, a government determines the way in which a country, state, county, township, city, or village is run. At every level, government makes laws that citizens must obey and creates policies about everything connected with the daily life of a community—whether that community is a nation, a state or the town where you live.

Not In Our Town

Encourage students to think about how bullying can limit freedom of speech and expression with this lesson from PBS LearningMedia.  Students watch documentary videos, read informational text and complete writing assignments. Sign up for your free PBS LearningMedia account and use this fantastic resource! GET RESOURCE
This is part of the Inspiring Middle School Literacy collection.  

So Funny I Forgot to Laugh

How do you know if someone is laughing with you or at you?  What should you do if you witness bullying?  Help students find the answers to these and other questions with this interactive comic from PBS KIDS’ Arthur. This resource comes from PBS LearningMedia and is ideal for at-home use or in school at grade levels PreK through 4th. WATCH HERE
Be sure to check out the extension activities that go along with this for more social-emotional education!

Young Peace Leaders: Cultivating Self-Acceptance

Adolescents often have a hard time with self-acceptance.  On the one hand, they want to conform to their peers, and on the other, they want to discover their individuality – making it a struggle to strike the right balance.  Teachers and parents may notice that they become uncommunicative, uncooperative or rebellious at school or home as they go through the process of figuring out who they are and where they fit in. In this lesson from The Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values (via WGBH), students will learn to experience self-acceptance and develop leadership skills through the performing arts.  Activities such as improvisation, singing and movement help students better understand themselves, build a sense of confidence, appreciate their individuality, and use their newfound awareness to understand others.

Connect: NY | Common Core

New Public Affairs TV series explores critical issues in education with NYS Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia
The new series will explore statewide issues of critical importance and begins with six, monthly, one-hour panel discussions about education issues including: Common Core standards, teacher evaluation, school financing, achievement gaps, testing and opting out, and legal challenges. Susan Arbetter, host of “The Capitol Pressroom” will serve as host on the new show, and will moderate a panel conversation with NYS Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia. The show aims to give stakeholders across New York State a better understanding of education issues.  Connect: NY is produced by WCNY (Syracuse, NY) and WSKG TV will air this education series throughout 2015-2016. Watch a Preview

Teaching the Tough Subjects

How can educators present difficult topics to students that involve human suffering, like bullying and violence? This lesson provides insights and takeaways teachers can use during Bullying Prevention Month. We found this great resource on PBSLearningMedia.  Watch how educators present difficult topics involving human suffering in this episode of NJEA’s Classroom Close-up. Teachers and community groups have created curricula on topics such as the terrorist attacks of 9/11 and school shootings.

American Graduate Champion | Joe Renton

Joe Renton is recognized as a local American Graduate Champion! For nearly twenty years he and wife Barbara have provided informal music lessons to students in upstate New York. Mr. Renton volunteered with local high school bands on a daily basis providing instruction and mentorship to hundreds of students. Additionally, the Rentons sponsored music lessons and trips to the Binghamton Philharmonic for students to help cultivate a culture of music in the community. “Many activities come and go over time, but your knowledge of music is a lifelong gift that will open many doors for you.

American Graduate Champions | Dropout Prevention Educators

Everyday, classroom teachers have the opportunity to support and motive students to do their best and stay in school. Some local teachers are simply stellar at this. We call them caring, consistent adults and they are our local American Graduate Champions! https://youtu.be/x_5aMe1A3Os

Who’s the champion in your life? Follow the American Graduate movement!

American Graduate Week | WORLD Channel

From September 27th to October 2nd, WORLD Channel presents a week of documentaries that focus on the continuing challenges facing students, parents, teachers and administrators ‘outside’ of the 90%. Anchoring American Graduate on WORLD is an all-new Local, USA (Stories from the Classroom), If You Build It from WORLD’s original docu-series America ReFramed, and additional series Central Standard and Dropping Back In as well as eight other provocative programs.  
Here’s the local lineup which you can watch on WSKG’s World Channel/46.2:
M 9/28 | Local, USA | 6pm and 9pm
M 9/28 | The Graduates/Los Graduados | 7pm and 8pm

T 9/29 | The Graduate/Los Graduados | 2pm and 3pm
T 9/29 | Local, USA | 4pm
T 9/29 | Go Public: A Day in the Life of An American School District | 6:30pm

W 9/30 | Go Public: A Day in the Life of An American School District | 3:30pm
W 9/30 | Central Standard: On Education | 6:00pm and 6:30pm
W 9/30 | 180 Days: Hartsville | 8pm
W 9/30 | Schools That Change Communities | 9pm

Th 10/1 | 180 Days: Hartsville | 2pm and 3pm
Th 10/1 | Schools That Change Communities | 4pm
Th 10/1 | Central Standard: On Education | 6pm
Th 10/1 | 180 Days: A Year Inside An American High School | 7pm
Th 10/1 | Our Time is Now | 9pm

Fr 10/2 | Local, USA | 11am
F 10/2 | 180 Days: A Year Inside An American High School | 2pm
F 10/2 | Our Time is Now | 4pm
F 10/2 | Central Standard: On Education | 6pm
F 10/2 | Dropping Back In: Second Chances | 6:30pm
F 10/2 | 180 Days: A Year Inside An American High School | 7pm
F 10/2 | Facing Forward: A Student’s Story | 9pm

Inspired by the American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen initiative and supported by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB).   
 

The Eight Square Schoolhouse | #tbt

The Eight Square Schoolhouse was built in 1827 and was in use until 1941. It is the oldest school building still standing in Tompkins County, and is still used for living history and educational programs. In addition, the building is the only surviving brick octagonal schoolhouse in New York State. The octagonal shape allowed the teacher to be placed at a central and prominent position and allowed for better lighting and ventilation. Today the building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. You can learn more here.

Back to School

The other day marked the “unofficial” end of summer in my household as my daughter boarded the school bus for the first time and rode off to kindergarten. The event found my wife and I discussing the tradition of summer vacation and its origins. We both shared the belief that summer vacation was tied to America’s agrarian past, however upon further inquiry we discovered that our assumptions were mistaken. According to a PBS NewsHour article from 2014, the myth that summer vacation was directly tied to our nation’s agrarian roots is still very persistent. In realty, the early rural schools in America that were tied to an agrarian calendar had short summer and winter terms with breaks in the spring and fall.

Teaching Teachers

WSQX Radio | Sunday, August 30, 2015 at 10:00am

WSKG Radio | Monday, August 31, 2015 at 8:00pm

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they’re on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Looking to Get Your Girls Engaged in Science?

Are you a Teacher, Scout or 4-H leader? Or a parent looking for ways to engage your tween girls in STEM activities? First, what is STEM? Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, we can even incorporate the Arts and make it STEAM, which is how the world works in real life. Most things we use or see everyday fall into the STEAM category.

Watson | Classroom Guide

WATSON is an original documentary that explores a significant person who profoundly shaped the Southern Tier of New York State.  Features of this collection include themes, video clips, discussion questions, and activities.  The classroom elements were developed by NYS certified teachers and align with state and national standards. WATSON is the story of Thomas J. Watson, Sr. and the founding of the IBM corporation.  The life of Thomas J. Watson, Sr. exemplifies the American Dream story of rags to riches.

Path Through History | Classroom Guide

Path Through History is a unique teaching and learning tool that highlights various parks, museums, landmarks, and people throughout New York State. Students will experience many destinations such as battlefields, natural wonders, railroads, and even a cemetery!   Classroom elements include overview, themes, video segments, discussion questions, and activities. These were developed by teachers and align with New York State and national learning standards for the Social Studies content area. The collection includes over 25 videos covering a wide range of themes including Arts and Culture, Early American History, Innovation and Commerce, Natural History, Sports History, Transportation, and Women’s History. These resources are geared towards grades third through fifth.

Move It! | Classroom Guide

Join in the fun with Move It!. Our Blueberryanators and Ripe Bananas will take you all across Upstate New York and Northern Pennsylvania as they compete for points in challenges that test their strength, wit, food smarts and ability to stay calm under pressure. During “Move It!” segments, you’ll focus on physical activity. Learn how to power that fun during “Fuel It!”. Wrap things up with “Cool It!” and learn how self-awareness, through activities like yoga and goal-setting, can set you up for success next time.

Kids in Motion | Classroom Guide

Kids in Motion is part of WSKG Public Media’s Working on Wellness project. WSKG and partners Binghamton City School District, Broome-Tioga BOCES and the Broome County Health Department created lessons and media clips based upon Movement in the Classroom Physical Education curriculum. These video segments range in length from five to fifteen minutes demonstrating simple yet meaningful movement activities that are easily replicable in the classroom, after school or home setting. https://youtu.be/X2YmQPRGn6U?list=PLkEiFS5w2pdkyVZDhlJLu_YBmX_AZUduK
For more information, download our Kids In Motion flyer. 
This collection includes over 50 videos and lessons covering a wide variety of curriculum including, Math, English Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, Physical Education, The Arts and World Languages. These videos and lessons are geared towards grades Kindergarten through 5th.

Johnson | Classroom Guide

For over 50 years, George F. Johnson worked to build one of the largest and most successful manufacturing organizations in United States history, The Endicott-Johnson Shoe Corporation. Endicott-Johnson was a mammoth operation located in and around Binghamton, NY.  At its height, Endicott-Johnson employed over 20,000 people across nearly two dozen plants. Johnson’s company produced more than 52 million pairs of shoes a year, nearly 30% of the shoes made in America at the time. More importantly and for many E-J Shoes became a shining example of how a company and its workers could transform the way American industry operated. WSKG released the full Johnson documentary alongside the Watson film in 2011:

Visit the full Johnson collection online at PBSLearningMedia

Good to Know | Classroom Guide

Good To Know is a digital video series for adults that introduces the methods, vocabulary, and processes their child learns at school. These short, clear and fun videos will help to explain math topics that are taught in Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten and Grade 1 Common Core curricula. The videos will help develop a conceptual understanding of how math practices build on previous knowledge and empower parents and caregivers to help their children learn foundational math skills! Learn more about Good to Know through this intro video!:

Visit the full Good to Know collection online at PBSLearningMedia

 

Agnes: The Flood of '72 | Classroom Guide

Agnes: The Flood of ’72, is a WSKG original documentary that explores a significant event that greatly shaped the Southern Tier of New York and Northern Pennsylvania. Classroom elements include overview, themes, DVD segments, discussion questions, activities, and further resources. These were developed by teachers and align with New York State and national learning standards for the Social Studies and Science content areas. On June 19, 1972, the first hurricane of the season, Agnes, crossed over the Florida Panhandle and quickly headed back out to sea. With sustained winds of just over 75 miles per hour, Agnes was considered a low level threat by most weather experts.

What is American Graduate?

The WSKG American Graduate Project, funded by a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, is an initiative to raise awareness about the dropout crisis in our community by engaging a wide range of stakeholders in a dialogue and by mobilizing the community through a multimedia campaign to share resources, best practices, and stories of challenge and success. When students are asked if they will graduate from high school, about nine in 10 will answer ‘yes.’ However, statistics show about only seven in 10 students actually finish high school, and that statistic drops further for minority students and English Language Learners. Students have the will to graduate, but they do not always have the necessary support or resources. How can I talk about dropout issues in my classroom?

Program Places Lens on a Typical Day in a U.S. Public School

Go Public: A Day in the Life of an American School District documents a single day in an urban public school district, from sun up to long after sundown. On May 8, 2012, 50 directors and their small camera crews followed 50 individuals who attend, support and work in the Pasadena Unified School District, a racially and economically diverse district with 28 public school campuses. Administrators, teachers, students, support staff and volunteers lead us on journeys that reveal their unique contributions in making a public school district function. No voice-over narratives or expert commentaries, just an authentic window into the world of public education. Go Public gives audiences a chance to see and hear the people actually living the public school experience.