Pati’s Mexican Table – A Local’s Tour of Culiacan (801)

Enchiladas de Suelo
Makes 12 open enchiladas

Serves 6 as a main dish

 

 

INGREDIENTS

3 tablespoons distilled white vinegar, divided
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more for frying
2 teaspoons kosher or sea salt, divided, plus more for boiling water
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup slivered red onion
5 ancho chiles, stemmed and seeded
1 garlic clove
2 ripe tomatoes, divided, 1 whole and 1 cut into thin slices
1 tablespoon coarsely chopped white onion
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 pound zucchini, halved lengthwise and cut into half-moons of about 1/2-inch
1 pound Mexican chorizo, casings removed, chopped
12 corn tortillas, store-bought or homemade
6 leaves of romaine lettuce, rinsed and thinly sliced
6 ounces (about 5 to 6) radishes, halved lengthwise and cut into half-moons of about 1/2-inch
1 ripe avocado, halved, pitted, cut into thin slices
1 cucumber, peeled, halved lengthwise and cut into slices
1 cup crumbled queso Cotija, ranchero or fresco

TO PREPARE

In a small bowl, whisk 2 tablespoons of white vinegar with the vegetable oil, a teaspoon of salt, and a dash of black pepper. Add the red onion, stir, and let macerate for at least 15 minutes or while you prepare the rest of the dish. Place the ancho chiles, garlic clove, and the whole tomato in a medium saucepan and cover with water. Set over medium-high heat and simmer for 8 to 10 minutes until the chiles have rehydrated and the tomato is cooked and mushy. Transfer the chiles, tomato, and garlic clove, along with 1 cup of their cooking liquid, to a blender.

America’s Test Kitchen Kung Pao Chicken (Ep 2009)

Kung Pao Chicken
Serves 4-6

Kung pao chicken should be quite spicy. To adjust the heat level, use more or fewer chiles, depending on the size (we used 2-inch-long chiles) and your taste. Have your ingredients prepared and your equipment in place before you begin to cook. Use a spice grinder or mortar and pestle to coarsely grind the Sichuan peppercorns. If Chinese black vinegar is unavailable, substitute sherry vinegar.

Milk Street New French Classics (Ep 320)

Beef, Orange and Olive Stew (Boeuf à la Gardiane)
Start to finish: 41⁄2 hours (1 hour active) | Servings: 6 to 8

This hearty stew from Camargue, in the south of France, is traditionally made with taureau, or bull meat, but beef is a common substitute. We use chuck roast, a fatty cut that becomes tender and succulent with simmering. The stew gets robust flavor from classic Provençal ingredients—red wine, olives, anchovies and garlic. Orange is traditional, too; it lends the braise a brightness that balances its depth and richness. A bold, full-bodied dry red wine such as Côtes du Rhône or syrah is ideal, as it holds its own among the other big flavors.

Anne Serling Talks About Her Father’s ‘O’Toole From Moscow’ Comedy

Rod Serling returns to radio, Saturday, April 18 at 2:00 p.m., with a repeat on Sunday, April 19 at 3:00 p.m on WSKG Radio. CINCINNATI, OH (WVXU) Anne Serling is confident that her famous father would be pleased that Cincinnati Public Radio is reviving O’ Toole From Moscow, his 1955 Cincinnati Reds comedy premiering 8 p.m. tonight on WVXU-FM and at wvxu.org. “I have a thought about my dad, imagining him listening, nodding and just beaming. I am so grateful,” said Serling, daughter of Rod Serling, creator of TV’s The Twilight Zone. Rod Serling, who started his career in Cincinnati (1950-54), wrote O’Toole for NBC’s Matinee Theater.

Milk Street Thailand North to South (Ep 319)

Southern Thai–Style Fried Chicken
Start to finish: 40 minutes, plus marinating | Servings: 4

Gai tod hat yai, or fried chicken from the southern region of Thailand, inspired this recipe, but we made it quicker by using boneless, skinless thighs cut into strips instead of the typical bone-in, skin-on parts. The chicken is customarily sprinkled with crisp fried shallots after cooking, but we opted out of this garnish, as the spices themselves provide plenty of bold flavor. If you like, you can purchase fried shallots in most Asian grocery stores; scatter them over the chicken just before serving. If you’re not up for making our extra-easy version of Thai sweet chili sauce (nam jim gai), serve with store-bought sweet chili sauce, or simply offer lime wedges for squeezing. Don’t marinate the chicken for longer than an hour or it will be too salty.

American Experience: The Vote

American Experience: The Vote
Premieres Monday, July 6 on WSKG-TV
One hundred years after the passage of the 19th Amendment, The Vote tells the dramatic culmination story of the hard-fought campaign waged by American women for the right to vote — a transformative cultural and political movement that resulted in the largest expansion of voting rights in U.S. history. In its final decade, from 1909 to 1920, movement leaders wrestled with contentious questions about the most effective methods for affecting social change. They debated the use of militant, even violent tactics, as well as hunger strikes and relentless public protests. The battle for the vote also upended previously accepted ideas about the proper role of women in American society and challenged the definitions of citizenship and democracy. Exploring how and why millions of 20th-century Americans mobilized for — and against — women’s suffrage, The Vote brings to life the unsung leaders of the movement and the deep controversies over gender roles and race that divided Americans then — and continue to dominate political discourse today.