Young String Players Present Their Winter Concert

The Little Delaware Youth Ensemble presents their Winter Concert in two performances.  Conductor Uli Speth joins us to talk about the program and about the history of the ensemble, as well as an upcoming workshop for the group.  

Photo credit: Little Delaware Youth Ensemble

‘Native America’ Screening Event at the Rockwell Museum

Join us as we partner with the Rockwell Museum to host a screening event of Native America Thursday, December 6th, 2018 from 6pm-8pm at the Rockwell, 111 Cedar Street Corning, NY. We will be screening the ‘Nature to Nations’ episode of Native America. Space is limited and registration is encouraged. Visit this webpage for full details and to register. 

WSKG was pleased to interview a local woman, Alisha Merrill, and share a snapshot of her #NativeVoicesPBS story. Watch the video below.

‘Native America’ TV Series & Event Coming This Fall

Explore the world created by America’s First Peoples. The four part series reaches back 15,000 years to reveal massive cities aligned to the stars, unique systems of science and spirituality, and 100 million people connected by social networks spanning two continents. https://youtu.be/DJy9STLb9IU

EPISODES
From Caves to Cosmos
Combine ancient wisdom and modern science to answer a 15,000-year-old question: who were America’s First Peoples? Nature to Nations
Explore the rise of great American nations, from monarchies to democracies. Cities of the Sky
Discover the cosmological secrets behind America’s ancient cities.

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‘GlassBarge’ Helps Corning Mark Sesquicentennial Milestone

BUFFALO, NY (WBFO) – Over the weekend, visitors to Canalside Buffalo have an opportunity to visit the GlassBarge, a traveling exhibit by the Corning Museum of Glass which is on tour to mark 150 years of glassblowing and glass production in that town. The visit also coincides with an ongoing celebration of the Erie Canal’s bicentennial.

Fresh Air’s Maureen Corrigan on Being a Book Critic

‘Fresh Air’ book critic Maureen Corrigan will be speaking at the 2018 Women’s Fund Breakfast hosted by the Women’s Fund of the Community Foundation for South Central New York. She joins us by phone to tell how she became book critic for ‘Fresh Air’, how many books land on her front porch every week, and what it is like to discover a great book by a previously unknown author.

The Dorothy Cotton Jubilee Singers Present a Concert in Elmira

The Music Director of the Dorothy Cotton Jubilee Singers, Baruch Whitehead, joins us to talk about their concert on Sunday, March 25 in the Clemens Center in Elmira, which presents a variety of Negro Spirituals. He talks about the meaning behind these moving songs and their historical context.

Charles Yaple's "Jacob's Land" Explores the Settling of New York's Frontier

Recently, author and SUNY Cortland professor Dr. Charles Yaple spoke with WSKG’s Shane Johnson about his new nonfiction book, Jacob’s Land: Revolutionary War Soldiers, Schemers, Scoundrels and the Settling of New York’s Frontier (2017). The book chronicles life on New York’s frontier before, during, and after the American Revolution. It does this by weaving together the stories of three individuals; Native American leader Joseph Brant, George Washington’s Surveyor General Simeon DeWitt, and Dr. Yaple’s own ancestor Jacob Yaple. Dr. Yaple is Professor Emeritus of Recreation, Parks and Leisure Studies at SUNY Cortland, and Director of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors. His first book, Foxey Brown: A story of an Adirondack Outlaw, Hermit and Guide as He Might Have Told It, was published in 2011.

Charles Yaple’s “Jacob’s Land” Explores the Settling of New York’s Frontier

Recently, author and SUNY Cortland professor Dr. Charles Yaple spoke with WSKG’s Shane Johnson about his new nonfiction book, Jacob’s Land: Revolutionary War Soldiers, Schemers, Scoundrels and the Settling of New York’s Frontier (2017). The book chronicles life on New York’s frontier before, during, and after the American Revolution. It does this by weaving together the stories of three individuals; Native American leader Joseph Brant, George Washington’s Surveyor General Simeon DeWitt, and Dr. Yaple’s own ancestor Jacob Yaple. Dr. Yaple is Professor Emeritus of Recreation, Parks and Leisure Studies at SUNY Cortland, and Director of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors. His first book, Foxey Brown: A story of an Adirondack Outlaw, Hermit and Guide as He Might Have Told It, was published in 2011.

Hanford Mills Celebrates Independence Day

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The Hanford Mills Museum celebrates Independence Day with demonstrations, a fishing contest, frog-jumping, and ice cream made by a steam-powered churn using ice from last winter’s Ice Harvest.  Executive Director Liz Callahan talks about the many events and hands-on learning opportunities available at the Independence Day Celebration. http://wskg.org/audio/hanford4th.mp3

Did You Miss 'The Great War'? Watch it Now!

Drawing on unpublished diaries, memoirs and letters, The Great War tells the rich and complex story of World War I through the voices of nurses, journalists, aviators and the American troops who came to be known as “doughboys.”  It is a story of heroism and sacrifice that would ultimately claim 15 million lives and profoundly change the world forever. Watch all three parts of The Great War below. The Great War: Part 1

The Great War: Part 2

The Great War: Part 3

Won’t You be my Neighbor | Chords of Memory

In this episode of Chords of Memory we highlight the photography of Verne Morton, a photographer from Groton, New York. Joanna Patchett sings the theme from Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, “Won’t You be my Neighbor”. Photographs courtesy of the History Center in Tompkins County. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=liAGx7MkyUM

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives.

New York and the Civil War | Chords of Memory

This episode of Chords of Memory highlights photographs of New York State soldiers who fought during the Civil War. Brian Hyland provides the music and plays “An Mhaighdean Mhara” on his concertina. Photographs courtesy of the Chemung County Historical Society, the Delaware County Historical Association, and the Library of Congress. https://youtu.be/L6nVm-26Pxw

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives.

The Photography of Joseph K. Noyes | Chords of Memory

In this episode of Chords of Memory we highlight the photography of Joseph K. Noyes, an amateur photographer from Binghamton, New York. Robert Perez provides the musical arrangement, playing his song “My Life”. Photographs courtesy of the Broome County Historical Society. https://youtu.be/nf-KxwjouyQ

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives.

The Photography of Sol Goldberg | Chords of Memory

In this episode of Chords of Memory we highlight the photography of Sol Goldberg, a photographer from Ithaca, New York. Joanna Patchett sings “Mister Sun”. Photographs courtesy of the History Center in Tompkins County. https://youtu.be/oIfsrP0ii94

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives.

Did You Miss the Latest Episode of 'Mercy Street'? Watch it Now!

Based on real events, PBS’s new Civil War drama Mercy Street follows a diverse and colorful cast of characters — doctors, nurses, contraband laborers and Southern loyalists — and brings to life the chaotic world of Union-occupied Alexandria, Virginia, and the Mansion House Hospital in the early years of the Civil War. Get caught up on Season 2 below and watch new episodes Sundays at 8PM on WSKG TV. Watch Season 2 | Episode 4

Watch Season 2 | Episode 3

Watch new episodes Sundays at 8PM on WSKG TV.

Binghamton Noir | Chords of Memory

The photographs in this episode of Chords of Memory were taken in Binghamton, New York between 1937 and 1947. Phil Westcott provides the musical arrangement on his saxophone. Photographs courtesy of the Broome County Historical Society. https://youtu.be/C_EQh9kgLoc

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives.

Small Town Life | Chords of Memory

In our second installment of  Chords of Memory, we highlight photos that illustrate small town life in the early 19th century while Robert Perez plays his song “Summer” on guitar. Photographs courtesy of the Delaware County Historical Association. https://youtu.be/E8RfuLNEeCc

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives. Each piece is intimate and performed acoustically, and many of the photographs shown are preserved at historical societies across our region.

Lt. Benjamin Loring | A Civil War Story

Benjamin Loring was born on October 14, 1824, in Duxbury, Massachusetts. During the Civil War, Loring enlisted in the U.S. Navy and participated in a number of important battles, serving with distinction on three different warships. After the war, Loring settled in Owego, New York where he lived out the rest of his days. Today, the Tioga County Historical Society Museum in Owego preserves an item from Benjamin Loring’s military service that was present at one of the defining moments in American History. https://youtu.be/Df5GIyI6yt8

If you enjoy Civil War history or great television drama be sure to tune in for the second season of PBS’s Civil War medical drama Mercy Street, Sundays at 8PM on WSKG TV.

The Photography of Verne Morton | Chords of Memory

In this episode of Chords of Memory we highlight the photography of Verne Morton, a photographer from Groton, New York. Brian Hyland provides the music, playing the traditional Irish tune “The South Wind”. Photographs courtesy of the History Center in Tompkins County. https://youtu.be/2CDSl2dANz0

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives.

Chords of Memory | Coming Soon

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives. Each piece is intimate and performed acoustically, and many of the photographs shown are preserved at historical societies across our region. Look for more videos coming soon! https://youtu.be/aPz-gv-lfjo

Get a Sneak Peek at the Second Season of 'Mercy Street'

Join us at WSKG Studios in Vestal as we preview the first episode from season two of Mercy Street on January 19 at 6PM. The screening is free and open to the public, but space is limited and an RSVP is required. Write to rsvp@wskg.org . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1tP5QjOfqGg

Inspired by real people and events, Mercy Street goes beyond the front lines of the Civil War and into the chaotic world of the Mansion House Hospital in Union-occupied Alexandria, Virginia. Mercy Street takes viewers beyond the battlefield and into the lives of Americans on the Civil War home front as they face the unprecedented challenges of one of the most turbulent times in our nation’s history. Season 2 of Mercy Street premieres January 22, 2017 at 8PM on WSKG TV.

Hot Wheels

In 1968, Elliot Handler, the co-founder of Mattel, devised a plan to compete with the popular Matchbox model car line from the British company Lesney Products. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tve7kI2xJGs

As apposed to Matchbox’s more realistic themed cars, Mattel’s cars were designed to look like the popular hot-rods of the era. They featured vibrant “spectra-flame” paint and were able to achieve extremely high speeds thanks to low friction plastic. It was the birth of Hot Wheels, and by the end of the decade Hot Wheels was the hottest toy car brand in the US. The early Hot Wheel’s cars were affectionately referred to as “Redlines” because of the distinctive red pinstripe found of their wheels, and today they are highly sought after by collectors.

Fire Trucks

Toy fire engines first became popular with young children in the 1880s. Typically made from cast iron and tinplate, these early toy fire wagons were extremely detailed and included a number of accessories including hoses and ladders. Today, toy fire engines still manage to capture the hearts and minds of young and old alike. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGM75CaKjEg

Watch More Timeless Toys Videos.

Lunch Boxes

Metal lunch pails became popular among blue-collar workers at the end of the 19th century. The first metal lunch boxes for children were made in the 1920s and 30s, for children who wanted to emulate their working parents. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idsRJtetq_0

In 1950, Aladdin Industries revolutionized child lunch boxes when they released a metal lunch box decorated with a decal of Hopalong Cassidy – it was a huge success, and soon a slew of other character-based lunch boxes followed. Between 1950 and 1970, 120 million lunch boxes were sold. In the 1960s, cheap vinyl lunch boxes made a brief appearance, but they were too flimsy and failed to catch on with kids.

Robot Toys

While mechanical automata had existed since ancient Greece, the first mass-produced mechanical toy robots were built in Japan following World War II. These early wind-up robots, typically made from tin and wonderfully detailed, delighted young children around the world. Now considered both works of art and engineering wonders, the toy robots from the 1940s and 50s are highly sought after by collectors. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9Vboa8jk6w

Watch More Timeless Toys Videos.

Dollhouses

The first dollhouses were originally built as expressions of wealth for members of Europe’s aristocracy during the 16th century, but it wasn’t long before children became fascinated with the miniature homes. German craftsmen began making dollhouses for children during the 17th and 18th century, and by the 19th century mass-production methods allowed toy makers to produce dollhouses cheaply and quickly. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVwg8NZq0Pg&t=12s

The toy became a favorite among children in the growing middle class, and by the 20th century toy makers were making dollhouses that suited a large range of tastes and needs. Today, dollhouses of all shapes and sizes continue to be a desired plaything among children.  

Watch More Timeless Toys Videos.

‘The Battle of Chosin’ tells the Harrowing Story of the Pivotal 1950 Korean War Battle

American Experience The Battle of Chosin airs November 1 at 9PM on WSKG-TV. Revisit the pivotal 1950 Korean War battle through the eyewitness accounts of participants. It is a harrowing story of bloody combat and heroic survival. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcq5Ko6uizY

On Thanksgiving Day 1950, American-led United Nations troops were on the march in North Korea, and U.S. Marine and Air Force pilots distributed holiday meals. Soon after that peaceful celebration, American military leaders, including General Douglas MacArthur, were caught off guard by the entrance of the People’s Republic of China, led by Mao Zedong, into the five-month-old Korean War.

'The Battle of Chosin' tells the Harrowing Story of the Pivotal 1950 Korean War Battle

American Experience The Battle of Chosin airs November 1 at 9PM on WSKG-TV. Revisit the pivotal 1950 Korean War battle through the eyewitness accounts of participants. It is a harrowing story of bloody combat and heroic survival. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcq5Ko6uizY

On Thanksgiving Day 1950, American-led United Nations troops were on the march in North Korea, and U.S. Marine and Air Force pilots distributed holiday meals. Soon after that peaceful celebration, American military leaders, including General Douglas MacArthur, were caught off guard by the entrance of the People’s Republic of China, led by Mao Zedong, into the five-month-old Korean War.

Historian James M. McPherson Discusses his Role as a Historical Consultant on 'Mercy Street'

Recently, noted Civil War historian James M. McPherson, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “Battle Cry of Freedom” (1988), visited Binghamton University to deliver the ninth annual Shriber Lecture. Professor McPherson sat down with WSKG History to discuss his career and Civil War history. In this clip from our interview, Professor McPherson discusses his involvement as a historical consultant on PBS’s Civil War medical drama MERCY STREET. MERCY STREET is currently in production on its second season. 

(The partial transcript below has been edited for clarity.)

Highlights from the interview
There were a half-dozen different historical consultants, each of them with a different expertise. My role was, as a Civil War historian, to make sure that they got the references to what was going on in the war… right.

Historian James M. McPherson on the Continuing Impact of the Civil War Today

Recently, noted Civil War historian James M. McPherson, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “Battle Cry of Freedom” (1988), visited Binghamton University to deliver the ninth annual Shriber Lecture. Professor McPherson sat down with WSKG History to discuss his career, Civil War history, and his involvement as a historical consultant on PBS’s Civil War medical drama MERCY STREET. In this clip from our interview, Professor McPherson shares his thoughts on some of the lasting impacts of the Civil War. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwlGXNyb3jQ

(The partial transcript below has been edited for clarity.)

Highlights from the Interview
Well, we would not have a black man as president of United States had it not been for the changes accomplish by the Civil War – the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments of course framing those changes. We might not even be one country had it not been for the outcome of the Civil War.

Historian James M. McPherson Discusses the Influence of the Civil Rights Movement on his Career

Recently, noted Civil War historian James M. McPherson, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “Battle Cry of Freedom” (1988), visited Binghamton University to deliver the ninth annual Shriber Lecture. Professor McPherson sat down with WSKG History to discuss his career, Civil War history, and his involvement as a historical consultant on PBS’s Civil War medical drama MERCY STREET. In this clip from our interview, Professor McPherson discusses the influence of the Civil Right Movement on his career. 

 

(The partial transcript below has been edited for clarity.)

 
On the influence of the Civil Rights Movement and his career
When I got to Baltimore, and this was at the end of the 1950s and in the early 1960s, I was surrounded by the Civil Rights Movement and by a kind of historical deja vu. Because, in the 1960s there was this confrontation between the Federal Government and southern political leaders who were vowing massive resistance to national law, talking about interposition of the state sovereignty between people of the state and the national government, violence in the South, federal troops being sent into the South… On a different scale, a massive scale, this had happened a hundred years earlier and what was going on in the 1960s had a direct relationship to what went on in the 1860s. So I decided to do my dissertation on the civil rights activists of the 1860s, the abolitionists…

'So Close to Home' Illuminates a Little-Known World War II Event

Recently, New York Times bestselling author Michael J. Tougias spoke with WSKG History about his new book, “So Close to Home: A True Story of an American Family’s Fight for Survival During World War II” (2016). Co-written with journalist Alison O’Leary, “So Close to Home” chronicles a U-boat attack in the Gulf of Mexico, a family’s resilience, and the daring patrol of the submarine commander. Michael J. Tougias is the author and co-author of over 20 books, including “The Finest Hours” (2009) which was adapted into a major motion picture starring Chris Pine and Casey Affleck in 2016. Many of his books have a predominant theme of true survival-at-sea adventures. He has also written for the New York Times, the Boston Globe, USA Today, and many other publications. Listen to the interview:

(The partial transcript below has been edited for clarity.)

 

Interview Highlights
On the war in the Atlantic

When the U.S. entered the war with Germany, the first thing the Germans did was launch Operation Drumbeat. They sent over U-boats here before we could become proficient at defending against them, and it was like a turkey shoot.

Historian James M. McPherson Talks Civil War History and 'Mercy Street'

Recently, noted Civil War historian James M. McPherson visited Binghamton University to deliver the ninth annual Shriber Lecture. Professor McPherson sat down with WSKG History to discuss his career, Civil War history, and his involvement as a historical consultant on PBS’s Civil War medical drama MERCY STREET.  

Dr. James McPherson is the George Henry Davis ‘86 Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton University and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “Battle Cry of Freedom” (1988). He taught American history at Princeton University for 42 years and served as president of the American Historical Association. McPherson’s work mainly focuses on the American Civil War and Reconstruction and he is the recipient of two separate Lincoln Prizes.

Celebrate the National Park Service Centennial with Ken Burns's 'The National Parks' on WSKG TV

The National Park Service turns 100 this summer and WSKG and PBS are re-airing Ken Burns’s documentary THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA, April 25-30 to celebrate . You can catch a new episode each night that week at 9PM on WSKG TV. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUfgKhN6Tco

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA is a six-episode series produced by Ken Burns and Dayton Duncan and written by Dayton Duncan. Filmed over the course of more than six years at some of nature’s most spectacular locales – from Acadia to Yosemite, Yellowstone to the Grand Canyon, the Everglades of Florida to the Gates of the Arctic in Alaska – THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA’S BEST IDEA is nonetheless a story of people: people from every conceivable background – rich and poor; famous and unknown; soldiers and scientists; natives and newcomers; idealists, artists and entrepreneurs; people who were willing to devote themselves to saving some precious portion of the land they loved, and in doing so reminded their fellow citizens of the full meaning of democracy.  

Main Image: Courtesy of Photo by Craig Mellish

Watch Both Parts of Ken Burns's 'Jackie Robinson' Online

Jack Roosevelt Robinson rose from humble origins to cross baseball’s color line and become one of the most beloved men in America. A fierce integrationist, Robinson used his immense fame to speak out against the discrimination he saw on and off the field, angering fans, the press, and even teammates who had once celebrated him for “turning the other cheek.” JACKIE ROBINSON, a new two-part, four-hour documentary directed by Ken Burns, Sarah Burns and David McMahon, chronicles the life and times of Jackie Robinson. Watch Part I:

Watch Part II:

 

Main Image: Courtesy of Hulton Archive Getty Images.

New Film From Ken Burns Tells the Story of Jackie Robinson

JACKIE ROBINSON, a new two-part, four-hour documentary directed by Ken Burns, Sarah Burns and David McMahon, will air April 11 and 12, at 9:00 p.m. on WSKG TV. The film chronicles the life and times of Robinson, his breaking of baseball’s color barrier and his lifelong fight for equality on and off the field. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mr5P8dcn3n4

“Jackie Robinson is the most important figure in our nation’s most important game,” said Ken Burns. “He gave us our first lasting progress in civil rights since the Civil War and, ever since I finished my BASEBALL series in 1994, I’ve been eager to make a stand-alone film about the life of this courageous American. There was so much more to say not only about Robinson’s barrier-breaking moment in 1947, but about how his upbringing shaped his intolerance for any form of discrimination and how after his baseball career, he spoke out tirelessly against racial injustice, even after his star had begun to dim.”

In addition to interviews with Robinson’s widow, Rachel, and their surviving children, Sharon and David, the film features interviews with President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama; former Dodgers teammates Don Newcombe, Carl Erskine and Ralph Branca; writers Howard Bryant and Gerald Early; Harry Belafonte; Tom Brokaw; and Carly Simon.

PBS Announces Second Season of 'Mercy Street'.

In a press release today, PBS announced that it has given the greenlight to a second season of MERCY STREET, PBS’ first original drama in more than a decade. The first season, executive produced by Ridley Scott (The Martian, Gladiator, Thelma and Louise); David W. Zucker (“The Good Wife” and “The Man in the High Castle”) of Scott Free; Lisa Q. Wolfinger (“Desperate Crossing, The untold story of the Mayflower”) and David Zabel (“ER”), drew 5.7 million viewers for the January 17 premiere. Based on real events, MERCY STREET follows a diverse and colorful cast of characters — doctors, nurses, contraband laborers and Southern loyalists — and brings to life the chaotic world of Union-occupied Alexandria, Virginia, and the Mansion House Hospital in the early years of the Civil War. Season two picks up directly from the dramatic events at the end of the season one finale, continuing to explore the growing chaos within Alexandria, the complicated interpersonal dynamics of Dr. Foster, Nurse Mary and the Mansion House staff, the increasingly precarious position of the Green family and the changing predicament of the burgeoning black population. The season will introduce a number of new elements, taking us closer to the fight and into the halls of Confederate power, all set against the intensifying war, starting with the Seven Days’ Battle and culminating with Antietam. To ensure historical accuracy of the first season, the producers engaged a team of advisors headed by noted historian Dr. James M. McPherson and including leading experts on Civil War medicine, military history, African-American history, women in the Civil War era and more. The list of prominent historical advisors has been expended even further for the second season.

The Empty Sleeve: Amputees and the Civil War

Editor’s Note: WSKG has asked faculty and graduate students in the History Department at Binghamton University to explore the history behind PBS’s new drama Mercy Street. In today’s blog post, graduate student Erika M. Grimminger discusses the causes and effects of amputations during the Civil War. Note: this post contains a graphic illustration of gangrene. The Empty Sleeve: Amputees and the Civil War
In Episode 4 of Mercy Street, Ezra Foster , the brother of Union Doctor Jed Foster and a Confederate soldier, comes to Mansion House Hospital with a serious leg wound that requires amputating. Ezra Foster’s story represents the stories of thousands of soldiers who suffered though amputations during the American Civil War and returned home missing body parts. While these Union and Confederate soldiers luckily survived serious trauma, their reintegration into society and with their families after the war was, at best, a hard process of readjustment and, at worst, an almost impossible struggle.

Medical Care at Elmira Prison Camp

Editor’s Note: WSKG has asked faculty and graduate students in the History Department at Binghamton University to explore the history behind PBS’s new Civil War medical drama Mercy Street. In today’s blog post, graduate student Gary Emerson discusses the medical care at the Elmira Prison Camp. Medical Care at Elmira Prison Camp
Although medical care improved over the course of the Civil War, prisoners often received inadequate and sometimes negligent medical care in prison camps. When prisoner exchanges broke down in the summer of 1863, both the Union and Confederate armies began placing large numbers of captured men into prison camps. Both sides were unprepared for this turn of events, and what followed proved disastrous. In the summer of 1864, the Union established a prison camp in Elmira, New York to house captured Confederates.

The Battlefield is Hard on a Boy: Suicide in the Civil War

Editor’s Note: WSKG has asked faculty and graduate students in the History Department at Binghamton University to explore the history behind PBS’s new drama Mercy Street. In today’s blog post, Professor Diane Sommerville discusses the topic of suicide and the Civil War.  

Warning: this post contains spoilers. The Battlefield is Hard on a Boy: Suicide in the Civil War
In Episode 4 of Mercy Street, the daring escape of Confederate private Tom Fairfax ends with his suicide. Tom’s boyhood friend Frank Stringfellow spirits him out of Mansion House Hospital under cover of darkness and escorts him to nearby Confederate lines so that Tom can rejoin his regiment. As Frank prepares his departure, Tom begins muttering, looking pre-occupied and anxious.

The 1961 Heisman Trophy Winner | #tbt

In today’s throwback Thursday photograph, President Kennedy greets the 1961 Heisman Trophy winner Ernie Davis. The photo was taken at a reception sponsored by the National Association of Manufacturers held at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City. As a young man, Ernie Davis attended Elmira Free Academy in Elmira, New York. Davis excelled at a number of different sports, but had a natural athletic gift for football. In 1958, Davis became a running back for Syracuse University and was selected Most Valuable Player in 1960.

Women, Abolitionism, and the Coming of the Civil War

Editor’s Note: WSKG has asked faculty and graduate students in the History Department at Binghamton University to explore the history behind PBS’s new drama Mercy Street. In today’s blog post, adjunct professor Kevin Murphy discusses the important role women played in the Abolition Movement. Women, Abolitionism, and the Coming of the Civil War
While the miniseries Mercy Street largely focuses on the practices of wartime medicine, the creative team behind the show also exposes viewers to the integral role women played in nineteenth-century reform. In the show’s opening scene, Mary Phinney (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), a transplanted New Englander, is interviewed by Dorothea Dix (Cherry Jones), a leader in the fight to reform care for the mentally ill and the Superintendent of Army Nurses during the Civil War. To the middle-aged Dix, Phinney stands out as an assertive but uncontroversial figure, the perfect young woman to become head nurse at the Mansion House Hotel. Well, almost uncontroversial.

Invisible Wounds: PTSD, the Civil War and Those Who "Remained and Suffered"

Editor’s Note: WSKG has asked faculty and graduate students in the History Department at Binghamton University to explore the history behind PBS’s new drama Mercy Street. In today’s blog post, graduate student Jonathan Jones discusses how historians are just beginning to understand how PTSD may have affected Civil War veterans. Invisible Wounds: PTSD and the Civil War
The Civil War was the greatest health crisis in American history. Some 750,000 soldiers died, and another 500,000 were wounded or maimed. From violent bullet and bayonet wounds, results of poor medical care like gangrene and infection, or debilitating illnesses like dysentery and malaria, the bodies and minds of those who survived the Civil War were scarred in a myriad of ways. For decades after the war’s end, thousands of survivors carried reminders of their wartime experiences with them in the form of amputations.

Tompkins County Farmer during the Great Depression | #tbt

Jack Delano took today’s throwback Thursday photograph in September 1940. It shows a farmer cutting a field of buckwheat along Route 79, near Ithaca, New York. This photo is just one of 170,000 photographs that were taken by the Farm Security Administration during the Great Depression. Between 1935 and 1945, the Farm Security Administrations and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) sent photographers across the country to document the effects of the depression and to help build support for New Deal relief programs. Photographers included Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, and Arthur Rothstein. The program also produced some of the most iconic images of the era.

The Civil War And Challenging the "Cult of True Womanhood"

Editor’s Note: WSKG has asked faculty and graduate students in the History Department at Binghamton University to explore the history behind PBS’s new drama Mercy Street. In today’s blog post, Binghamton alumnus, and WSKG producer, Shane Johnson discusses the 19th century concept of domesticity and how women challenged that notion during the Civil War. The Civil War And Challenging the “Cult of True Womanhood”
When Nurse Mary Phinney arrives at Mansion House in the first episode of Mercy Street, the camera circles around her as she tries to comprehend the overwhelming sights and sounds of a Civil War hospital. She has entered a new world. In many ways, the dramatized story of Nurse Phinney mirrors the stories of thousands of women who left their domestic worlds and enter the public sphere during the Civil War. In the process, these women challenged 19th century gender norms, the “cult of true womanhood,” and their acceptable place in American society at the time.

Dying a “Good Death” in the Civil War

Editor’s Note: WSKG has asked faculty and graduate students in the History Department at Binghamton University to explore the history behind PBS’s new drama Mercy Street. In today’s blog post, graduate student Melissa Franson discusses the 19th century concept of a “good death” and how the Civil War challenged that notion. Dying a “Good Death” in the Civil War
In the first episode of Mercy Street, we are confronted with the gruesome injuries and carnage that men inflicted upon one another during the Civil War. One of the most poignant moments in the series comes when a young soldier is brought into the hospital literally attached to the Union flag. Blood from the young soldier’s wounds has glued his hands to the flag. Having already lost his father in the war, the un-named soldier was unwilling and unable to relinquish his sole responsibility – making sure the flag did not fall. The young, scared soldier desperately tries to assert his masculinity while being comforted by the Army Chaplain, Harry Hopkins.

The American Civil War and the Origins of Government Surveillance

What do the American Civil War and the NSA have in common? That’s the questions explored in the most recent video of the web series Time Capsule. In “The Origins of Government Surveillance,” the Time Capsule team reveal how both the Union and Confederacy used spies and surveillance during the Civil War, and how these tactics laid the foundation for modern government surveillance. Watch Now:

Time Capsule is made by The Good Stuff from PBS Digital Studios, in association with PBS LearningMedia. Each episode looks at what happened in the past to make now possible. PBS LearningMedia also has a number of helpful tools for educators designed to teach students about the Civil War.

Books to read if you're loving 'Mercy Street'

PBS’s new Civil War medical drama Mercy Street follows a diverse cast of characters through the horrors of a Civil War hospital and the hectic world of Union-occupied Alexandria, Virginia. Set in the spring of 1862, many of the show’s characters and events are based on real people and actual happenings. If you want to learn more about the history behind the show, check out the reading list below. I based it on suggestions from PBS, as well as a few selections from my own library. It is by no means comprehensive, but should be a good starting point!

Listen to a 1962 Speech by Martin Luther King, Jr.

The other day on Facebook , NPR shared a story it produced in 2014 about the then recently discovered recording of a speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. from 1962. The New York State Museum unearthed the audiotape, once lost to history, while digitizing its massive archive. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QgJ5B6imPU

New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller asked King to address the New York Civil War Centennial Commission during a commemoration of the Emancipation Proclamation. The overall message of Dr. King’s speech was that the great promises set forth by the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Declaration of Independence, had fallen short. Dr. King believed that the best way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation was to “make its declaration of freedom real” by reaffirming America’s commitment to equality. Even today, 54 years after Dr. King spoke, his words resonant.

The Toll of Office

Since President Obama’s State of the Union address last week, I’ve seen a number of images floating around the web and on social media highlighting how the job of president has aged him over the last eight years. It’s not the first time that the media and the public have noticed this phenomena. The role of Commander-in-chief also took its toll on President George W. Bush and President Bill Clinton. Not to make it a competition, but whenever I see these types of comparisons my mind automatically turns to President Abraham Lincoln. The photo on the left was taken in June of 1860, when Lincoln was a candidate for president.

Celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day with PBS

PBS LearningMedia has a number of collections around some of the most significant pieces of history, including the March on Washington where Dr. King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech.  Learn about all of the resources here. In 2013, WSKG interviewed Ithaca, NY resident Dorothy Cotton, a leader of the SCLC in the 1960s.  She discusses what it was like to attend an activist training run by the group during the civil rights movements. On the first day, she says between 50 and 60 attendees sang “sorrow songs” of their shared experiences and struggles.

Building the Great Cathedrals

NOVA Building the Great Cathedrals airs on WSKG TV December 23rd at 9pm. Take a dazzling architectural journey inside those majestic marvels of Gothic architecture, the great cathedrals of Chartres, Beauvais and other European cities. Carved from 100 million pounds of stone, some cathedrals now teeter on the brink of catastrophic collapse. To save them, a team of engineers, architects, art historians, and computer scientists searches the naves, bays, and bell-towers for clues. NOVA investigates the architectural secrets that the cathedral builders used to erect their towering, glass-filled walls and reveals the hidden formulas drawn from the Bible that drove medieval builders ever upward.

Join Us For a 'Mercy Street' Exclusive Sneak Peek

UNFORTUNATELY, WE HAVE REACHED CAPACITY at our preview screening of MERCY STREET on January 7th at 6PM at WSKG Studios in Vestal. However, you can still watch the show’s premiere January 17, at 10PM on WSKG TV. Based on true stories, MERCY STREET takes viewers beyond the battlefield and into the lives of a distinctive cast of characters — doctors, nurses, contraband laborers and Southern loyalists — realizing the chaotic world of Union-occupied Alexandria, Virginia, and the Mansion House Hospital in the early years of the Civil War. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=He5ncAPB82M

Set in Virginia in the spring of 1862, MERCY STREET follows the lives of two volunteer nurses on opposite sides of the conflict; MARY PHINNEY, (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), a staunch New England abolitionist, and EMMA GREEN, (Hannah James), a naive young Confederate belle. The two collide at Mansion House, the Green family’s luxury hotel that has been taken over and transformed into a Union Army Hospital in Alexandria, a border town between North and South and the longest-occupied Confederate city of the war. Ruled under martial law, Alexandria is now the melting pot of the region, filled with soldiers, civilians, female volunteers, doctors, wounded fighting men from both sides, runaway slaves, prostitutes, speculators and spies. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5XOW0PTmKY

The intersection of North and South within the confines of a small occupied town creates a rich world that is chaotic, conflicted, corrupt, dynamic and even hopeful — a cauldron within which these characters strive, fight, love, laugh, betray, sacrifice and, at times, act like scoundrels.

What if Ken Burns had directed 'Star Wars'?

Have you ever wondered how Ken Burns might have told the story of Star Wars? Well thanks to Alyssa Rosenberg, a writer for The Washington Post, you don’t have to wonder any longer. To celebrate the release of  The Force Awakens and her love of Ken Burns documentaries, Rosenberg imagined how the pioneering documentarian might have told the story of the Galactic Civil War in a four minute video parody. It has all the hallmarks of a Ken Burns’ documentary. A calm narration, slow pans across still photographs, talking heads, and a letter home from a soldier who did not survive the conflict.

How Did the Invention of the Light Bulb, Refrigeration and Cell Phones Change the World?

Steven Johnson explains how innovator Frederic Tudor’s method of moving and storing ice blocks from cool to warm states engendered the ice trade.  

How We Got to Now airs on WSKG TV on December 9, 2015 from 9pm to 12am. How We Got To Now with Steven Johnson reveals the story behind the remarkable ideas that made modern life possible; the unsung heroes that brought them into the world – and the unexpected and bizarre consequences each of these innovations has triggered. It’s a journey that takes Steven to meet penguins in the middle of the desert, deep down into the sewers of San Francisco and to the frozen wastes of the Arctic to fish with the Inuit. “Light” – December 9, 2015 at 9pm
Steven Johnson relates the story of people who take us out of the dark and into the light.

Mary H. Owen | #tbt

Today’s throwback Thursday photo shows the Mary H. Owen navigating a lock on the Chenango Canal in Broome County. The canal was nearly 100 miles long and connected the Susquehanna River at Binghamton to the Erie Canal at Utica. When it opened in 1837, the canal drastically reduced shipping times and freight costs. As a part of the Erie Canal system, the Chenango Canal also connected the region’s farmers and manufacturers to the economic markets of New York City and the Great Lakes. However, by the late 1800s the railroad had all but replaced the once great canals of New York and the Chenango Canal ceased operation in 1878.

Horse Power | #tbt

In today’s throwback Thursday photograph, a Cortland County farm family uses a horse-powered treadmill to saw wood. For centuries, draft horses have been used on farms to plow fields, haul wagons, and for various other forms of hard labor. During the 19th century, farmers also used horses to provide their machinery with a dependable source of power. The horse treadmill utilized a system of gears and belts to harness the power of horses to thresh hay, saw wood, and even churn butter. The amount of force necessary to operate these treadmills was measured in “horse power,” a familiar term that is still used today.

The Unsung Hero of Walt Disney Studio

I’m going to get something right out of the way: I am no Disney expert. Before sitting down to watch American Experience’s new documentary about the life of Walt Disney (full video below), the most I knew about the man came from popular culture and the trip I took to Disneyland last year as an adult. But after watching the new film, I can say with confidence: Roy Disney, Walt’s older brother, is the unsung hero of Walt Disney Studio. It became very evident through the course of the documentary that while Walt was the visionary, Roy was the steady backbone of the organization. As my wife and I watched the new film last week we developed a running joke. Whenever something bad happened, one of us would yell “Fix it Roy.

Back to School

The other day marked the “unofficial” end of summer in my household as my daughter boarded the school bus for the first time and rode off to kindergarten. The event found my wife and I discussing the tradition of summer vacation and its origins. We both shared the belief that summer vacation was tied to America’s agrarian past, however upon further inquiry we discovered that our assumptions were mistaken. According to a PBS NewsHour article from 2014, the myth that summer vacation was directly tied to our nation’s agrarian roots is still very persistent. In realty, the early rural schools in America that were tied to an agrarian calendar had short summer and winter terms with breaks in the spring and fall.

The Civil War in HD

As I was growing up two movies helped shape my lifelong love of Civil War history. One was the 1993 film Gettysburg and the other was Ken Burns’ landmark documentary The Civil War. Both films sparked within me a deep fascination with this time period. I was encouraged to learn more on my own, both inside and out of the classroom, and I read many wonderful books along the way including James McPherson’s Battle Cry of Freedom. Now, 25 years after its original broadcast, The Civil War returns to PBS.

The Great Thanksgiving Listen

 

If you are a regular listener to WSKG you’re probably familiar with StoryCorps from their weekly broadcasts on NPR’s Morning Edition. The organization started collecting stories back in 2003 and every interview is archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. The conversations shared by StoryCorps on NPR are often thought provoking and emotionally powerful. On more than one occasion I’ve been brought to tears during my morning commute. But beyond their emotional resonance, the interviews represent one of the largest oral history projects of its kind and offer people a unique look at many fascinating and important aspects of American life.

Owego's Courthouse Square | #tbt

Built between 1871 and 1873, the Tioga County Courthouse is one of the oldest functioning courthouses in New York State and today it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Learn more about this picturesque location from our Uniquely New York video series:

Photograph courtesy of the Tioga County Historical Society.

New Exhibit at Binghamton University Highlights True Costs of the Civil War

The lower gallery of the Binghamton University Art Museum is abuzz with activity. A group of graduate students huddle around a tape measure debating the best way to hang a large picture frame on the wall. Around them on the floor, other frames and labels lay in neat rows. The students are setting up for a new exhibition, entitled The Civil War: Images of Ruin. “This is actually the first exhibition I’ve worked on,” explains Kasia Kieca, an art history student at Binghamton University.

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How Oscar Barton’s Drum Embodies Owego Civil War History

 

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For Black History Month, we are highlight notable black residents of the Southern Tier, starting with Oscar Barton. Barton was from Owego and, in 1863, he enlisted in the Union Army as a drummer. For two years, he carried his drum across the South as a member of the 26th United States Colored Troops. Barton’s drum is now on display at the Tioga County Historical Society Museum.

Space Toys

In the late 1960s, toy makers where quick to capitalize on America’s fascination with space. Some of the most popular toys in the industry centered on man’s trek through the stars.  
One of the most popular in a long line of space explorers was Mattel’s Major Matt Mason who looked to conquer the galaxy in his moon walker and space sled. In 1968 Marx introduced the popular Johnny Apollo line into the mix and Hasbro quickly signed up G.I. Joe for a trip into space with his Mercury styled Capsule. Dozens of different play-sets where to follow and America’s children played along with the real heroes of space.

Toy Trains

Children have played with toy trains since the earliest days of steam travel. During the 19th century, toy trains were made from cast iron and wood and children pushed or pulled them across the floor. By the turn of the century, trains were motorized and running on metal tracks. Toy companies such as Ives, American Flyer, and Marx all vied to control the toy train market. In 1924, Lionel Corporation captured the number spot, and by the 1950s Lionel had solidified their place as America’s most recognized name in toy train manufacturing.

Premiums

Companies in the United States have used promotional items, or premiums, to sell their products since the late 1700s. However, Kellogg’s popularized the technique in the early 1900s. During the 1930s and 40s, premiums were closely associated with popular radio programs such as the Lone Ranger and Little Orphan Annie. Later premiums capitalized on popular movies and TV shows. For generations, children have waited impatiently for the mail to arrive with their new decoder ring, baking soda powered Frogmen, or nuclear powered submarine – with real diving action.

Manoil Toy Soldiers

Toys soldiers have been played with since the time of the Pharaohs, but remained a toy for the wealthy until a new lead casting process revolutionized their production in the 19th century. In the 1930s, Maurice Manoil and his brother Jack began manufacturing lead soldiers out of their Manhattan factory. The pair soon moved their company to Waverly, New York, where they became the second largest producer of lead figures in the United States. The Manoil Manufacturing Co. also produced a number of different lead farm and western themed figurines, as well as die cast automobiles.

Crandall Toys

In 1866, Charles Martin Crandall began making toys at his furniture factory in Montrose Pennsylvania. Crandall’s first toy was a set of toy building blocks that utilized a new system of interlocking tongues and grooves. He would use this interlocking system in a number of other wood toys. In 1889, at his new factory in Waverly New York, Crandall invented what would become his most popular toy – “Pigs in Clover.” The ball in a maze puzzle game swept the nation and even brought a session of Congress to a standstill. Ultimately, Pigs in Clover sold over a million units, a record number for its time.

Lincoln Logs

In the 1860s, Joel Ellis of Springfield Vermont designed a new toy called “Log Cabin Playhouse.” Ellis’ construction set utilized a system of interlocking logs that many children today might recognize. Almost fifty years later, in 1916, John Lloyd Wright, son of Frank Lloyd Wright, immortalized this style of toy when he began marketing and selling his own version- which he called Lincoln Logs. Released around the same time as Tinker Toys and Erector Sets, Lincoln Logs continued a long tradition of constructions toys. Today distributed by K’nex, Lincoln Logs continue to be enjoyed by generations of children.

Marx Playsets

In the 1950s, Louis Marx and Company began producing elaborate plastic playsets.  
Marx capitalized on the popularity of westerns with their “Fort Apache” and “Roy Rogers,” series. While other Marx playsets were inspired by historical events or popular movies. Marx highly detailed and affordable playsets set the new standard that all later playsets would follow. Variations of Marx style playsets continue to be popular among toy manufacturers today.

Hartland Figurines

During the 1950s, the western was at the height of its popularity, and American toy manufactures moved to capitalize on this trend. Hartland Plastics Co. began producing cowboy figurines in 1953. Hartland modeled many of their figures after the popular TV and movie stars of the time – including James Arness, Gail Davis, and of course Roy Rogers with his faithful horse Trigger. The arrival of the space age in the 1960s, brought about the decline of interest in westerns and an end to Hartland’s western Line.

World War II Toys

Just three weeks before Christmas, on December 7th 1941, America was violently thrust in to the Second World War. When war rationing of metals, rubber and other products went into effect toy manufactures were forced to find other materials to build their instruments of play. Glass toys, often filled with candy, became a popular item. Many of the toys where molded into the shapes of tanks and planes that America’s children were quickly becoming very familiar with. One of the most popular series of toys released during the war where called “build-a-sets”, made completely out of cardboard.

Fisher-Price Toys

In 1930 Helen Schelle, who operated the Penny Walker Toy Shop in downtown Binghamton, joined forces with with two other entrepreneurs and started making wooden toys for pre-school aged children. They called it the Fisher-Price Toy Company and opened a manufacturing facility in East Aurora New York, outside Buffalo. In 1932, they introduced a delightful wind-up toy called “Puppy Back-up” which became an instant best seller. Many other hits would follow including the immensely popular “Snoopy Sniffer” pull toy in 1938. By the early 1960s, Fisher-price toys where known worldwide especially their “Little people” line, which included one of the most popular toys in the entire industry, the “Safety School Bus”.

View-Master

In 1939, a new instrument for displaying photographs was introduced to the world. Viewing black and white stereographic images had been around for decades, but inventor William Gruber and his partners found a unique way to utilize a newly introduced color slide film process called Kodachrome.  
Mounting 7 pairs of pictures on a single disk, allowing two slides to be viewed simultaneously, one with each eye, created the illusion of three-dimensional depth perception. They called it the View-Master and rolled it out at the Worlds Fair in New York. It became an instant sensation.

Historic Civil War Drum is Given New Life

In 1863, Oscar Barton enlisted in the Union Army as a drummer. For two years, he carried his drum across the South as a member of the 26th United States Colored Troops. Today, the Tioga County Historical Society has given his drum a second lease on life. OSCAR BARTON

In 1863, the Civil War was in its second hellish year, and thirty year old Oscar Barton was living in Vestal, New York. He was a descendant of free-blacks from Rhode Island, and his grandfather had been a soldier during the American Revolution.

Twilight Zone @ 50

Play

The WSKG program OFF THE PAGE is designed specifically as “a forum for writers from our region”.  Since its inception in January, 2000 it has presented hundreds of novelists, poets, playwrights, historians, essayists… (the list goes on and even includes farmers and a playground designer who wrote books).  With very few exceptions (mostly authors of books with special regional interest) they are people living and writing within the WSKG coverage area. For the first time OFF THE PAGE presents a program devoted to an author who is no longer with us. If, as Walt Whitman said, the proof of a poet is that his people absorb him as affectionately as he has them, we can apply that idea to playwright Rod Serling.  He belongs to Binghamton as much as the city was a part of him.  Even at his most fanciful or bizarre, in works destined to a mass audience, there are signs that Rod Serling never left home. http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/national/local-national-863354.mp3
“Everybody has to have a hometown, Binghamton’s mine.

Pleasant Valley Wine Co.

The Pleasant Valley Wine Company, also known as the Great Western Winery, is located near the village of Hammondsport, New York.  Established in 1860, It is the oldest winery in the Finger Lakes region. The winery proudly displays the designation U.S. Bonded Winery No. 1 and has eight remarkable stone buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TloWOmVyEik

Preserving a Piece of Revolutionary War History in New York

During the summer of 1779, a military expedition ravaged the landscape of upstate New York. Today, on the 235th anniversary of the Sullivan-Clinton Campaign, the Public Archeology Facility (PAF) at Binghamton University has received a grant to help preserve a part of this often overlooked aspect of the American Revolution. The Sullivan-Clinton Campaign

In May of 1779, General George Washington ordered Major General John Sullivan and Brigadier General James Clinton to lead a military expedition into the western frontier of New York and Pennsylvania. The expedition was the Continental response to a series of deadly raids conducted from the region by Loyalists  and their Iroquois allies – most notably at Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania and Cherry Valley in New York. The battles of Chemung and Newtown were the only major military engagements of the Sullivan-Clinton Campaign.

The History of Tourism in the Catskills

by Miranda Materazzo

When most people think of tourism in New York, they likely imagine the thousands of people who visit New York City every year. Famous sites like the Statue of Liberty, Times Square, the Empire State Building, and Central Park all very well may come to mind. But there was a time, not so long ago, when people flocked to visit Upstate New York as well. For decades in the mid 20th century, huge numbers of tourists came to visit the Catskill Mountain area of the state, which generally includes the area between New York City and Albany, the state capital. While people still visit the mountains today, the small towns nestled within them are no longer the economic centers that they were all those years ago.

Half A World Away and 70 Years Later, A Soldier's Sacrifice Remembered

In 1943, 2nd Lt. Joseph P. Congelli, a native of Hornell, New York and a member of the “Mighty Eighth” 8th Air Force, was shot down while he returned from a mission over Osnabruck, Germany. Today, a Dutch citizen has adopted Congelli’s name at the Wall of the Missing in Margraten, Netherlands. In an effort to learn more about his adopted soldier, Peter Cootjans reached out to WSKG, and this is what we discovered. THE WALL OF THE MISSING

This past Memorial Day, as the familiar sound of taps played at cemeteries across the United States, in the Netherlands, thousands of Dutch citizens gathered to decorate the graves and memorials of nearly 10,000 U.S. service members in the Netherlands American Cemetery.

Burroughs Memorial Field State Historic Site

John Burroughs walked this path many times over his lifetime. Located on the side of “Old Clump” mountain in the rural Catskills town of Roxbury, the path leads to a large stone landmark. “Boyhood Rock” as he later referred to it, was Burroughs private sanctuary where he could escape from farm chores and sit quietly studying his natural surroundings. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08B_J4lf_B4

Burroughs would later write of his observations, and through his essays, poetry and lectures, gained fame as one of America’s leading literary naturalists. He traveled widely throughout his life, but frequently returned to his beloved boyhood home in the Catskills.

Hanford Mills Museum

The old water-powered mill on Kortright Creek in East Meredith has been in operation since 1846. Named after David Josiah Hanford, who purchased the mill in 1860, Hanford Mills quickly expanded into a complex that included a sawmill, gristmill, feed-mill, woodworking shop and hardware store. Eventually, the mill also provided electric power to the surrounding community. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGE1UUtWAZw

Shortly after the mill business closed in 1967, the site reopened as a museum, and in 1973 was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Since then Hanford Mills Museum has provided visitors a rare opportunity to see an authentic mill in operation and learn about the important role mills played in rural New York communities.

The Delaware and Ulster Railroad

The picturesque Delaware and Ulster Railroad tour through the Catskill Region has been called “the most scenic rail line in the east.” Starting at the station in the hamlet of Arkville, the two-hour excursion follows the rails north to the town of Roxbury and back. Built in1872, the Roxbury station includes a museum of local history, and as part of the depot complex, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 24-mile round trip follows the same path that once moved coal and commercial goods throughout the area, and guided vacationers to the grand lodges of the Catskills until the train was replaced by the automobile. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJXtEnrecYw

Today, as in the past, passengers might enjoy a gourmet meal in an Art Deco dining car, or ride in one of the open-air or glass-covered observation cars, all the while taking in the incomparable views of the Catskill Mountains and the picturesque East Branch of the Delaware River.

Woodchuck Lodge

In the town of Roxbury, located high on a hill in the Catskills, is a rustic cabin known as Woodchuck Lodge, summer home of John Burroughs, one of America’s leading literary naturalists. Just over the hill stands the farmhouse where Burroughs grew up. Here Burroughs explored and studied his world, and developed his deep appreciation for nature that shaped the rest of his life. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=woyEuXBMBo0

Burroughs published his first book in 1871, and went on to write 25 volumes of essays, quickly establishing himself as the most popular writer of nature essays of his time. Over his lifetime, Burroughs became close friends with Walt Whitman and John Muir.

Fitches Covered Bridge

In 1870, James Frazier and James Warren built a covered bridge at Kingston Street in Delhi, spanning the West Branch Delaware River. Fifteen years later the bridge was moved three miles upstream to its current location in East Delhi, and “Kingston Bridge” became known as “Fitches Bridge”. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtC3damrfqI

With an overall length of 106 feet, the one-lane covered bridge is constructed with a lattice truss design, incorporating diagonally placed planks held together with large wooden pegs, or treenails. Today, it is one of only ten covered bridges in the state utilizing this type of construction. In 1999, the bridge was listed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places, and has been extensively restored and rehabilitated twice, most recently in 2001.

Kirkside Park

Beginning in the late 1890’s, and for the next 40 years, Kirkside Park was part of the estate of one of Roxbury’s most famous residents, philanthropist Helen Gould Shepherd. The 11-acre park encompasses both banks of the East Branch of the Delaware River, includes Adirondack style bridges, gazebos, a waterfall and stone terraces. Unfortunately, following Mrs. Shepherd’s death in 1938, the park fell into disrepair. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5qg-73zPYs

In 1999, the Town of Roxbury launched a park revitalization project, and today, Kirkside Park, with its rustic bridges, riverside paths, flower gardens and ball fields has been restored to its former grandeur. Once again Kirkside Park stands as a center of activity and natural beauty on New York’s Path Through History.

Delaware County Historical Association

The Delaware County Historical Association collects, preserves and shares the history and traditions of Delaware County and the surrounding region. Buildings located on its historic site in Delhi include a fully restored late 18th century federal-style house, original barns and outbuildings, a gun-shop, one-room schoolhouse, and blacksmith shop. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzcmej4hFvc

Within the main building are two exhibit galleries, a research library with a vast collection of genealogical information, and a gift shop. The old Christian Church, also owned by the Historical Association, is located just up the street next to Fitches Covered Bridge. The church also hosts exhibits, concerts and plays.

Wharton Studios

Wharton Inc.

In 1914, Theodore Wharton and his brother Leopold opened Wharton Inc., a silent film studio in Ithaca, NY. Between 1914 and 1919, the studio produced over a 100 different short and feature length movies. The majority of the films were action-adventure and comedy serials, featuring stars such as Pearl White, Oliver Hardy, Irene Castle, and Lionel Barrymore. The Wharton Brothers also utilized Ithaca storefronts and the majestic gorges and waterfalls of Tompkins County as the backdrops to many of their films. Sadly, the studio fell into tough financial straits and had to close its doors in 1919. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UNVwpXAxEU

Today, the Ithaca Motion Picture Project has plans to convert the former Wharton studio building, which still stands in Stewart Park, into a museum.

Robert H. Treman State Park

Robert H. Treman State Park, with its cascading waterfalls, winding trails, and magnificent views contains some of the most magnificent natural wonders found in Ithaca. In 1920, Robert H. Treman, an Ithaca banker and Cornell Trustee, and his wife Laura, donated the land to establish the Enfield Glen Reservation state park. The park was later renamed in memory of Treman in 1938. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rc9HrVu-fmw

Today, the park extends over 1,000 acres and includes nine miles of hiking trails, 12 waterfalls, including the spectacular 115-foot Lucifer Falls, a swimming area, cabins, and camping sites. In addition, visitors can find a 170-year-old gristmill within the park grounds, and spot numerous fossils in the shale rock lining the creek bed and gorge walls.

Cornell University

High above Cayuga Lake in Tompkins County sits a university that is consistently ranked as one of the top institutions of higher learning in the United States. Opened in 1868, Cornell University started in one building and with only 412 students. Today, it includes over 700 buildings, 14 colleges and schools, and enrolls over 20,000 students. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3HZ1-7WzYto

The university was the brainchild of New York Senator Ezra Cornell. Cornell had grown up poor, but had made a substantial fortune in the telegraph business.

Sciencenter

“Look, touch, listen and discover…” that’s what a visit to the Sciencenter in Ithaca is all about. Founded in 1983, the Sciencenter strives to inspire through its hands-on exhibits and programs, each designed to educate and engaged visitors in the wonders of science. With a variety of educational programs and over 250 exhibits, including a tide pool touch tank, an outdoor science park, and an astronomical exhibition, the museum can be appreciated by guests of all ages. One of the popular attractions is The Sagan Planet Walk exhibit, which was created in memory of former Ithaca resident and Cornell University professor Carl Sagan. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ei2Hx60221k

The Sagan Planet Walk is just one of the many things to LOOK AT, TOUCH, LISTEN TO, and DISCOVER while travelling New York’s Path Through History.

Museum of the Earth

Overlooking Cayuga Lake, Museum of the Earth in Ithaca, takes visitors on a journey through time that spans over four billion years — from the earth’s origin to the present day. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUdDRz5iCMw

Established in 2003 by the Paleontological Research Institute, Museum of the Earth provides a unique opportunity for visitors of all ages to learn about the history of life on earth in fun and exciting ways. In addition to the “Journey Through Time” exhibition, permanent features include a glacier exhibit, reconstructed Mastodon and Right Whale skeletons, a coral reef aquaria, and interactive discovery labs. Temporary exhibits include natural history displays, interactive science features, and art exhibitions. With each visit to Museum of the Earth there is more to be learned, making this not just an essential, but also a frequent stop on New York’s Path Through History.

The History Center of Tompkins County

Located in the renovated Gateway Center in Ithaca, just walking distance from the Commons, the History Center in Tompkins County maintains an extensive collection and provides a variety of unique exhibitions and programs on local history. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsH4BQal1JI

The center’s main goal is to give community members access to the tools needed to study the past in order to illuminate the present. To accomplish this mission the museum offers educational programs, workshops, resource programs, and walking tours — each designed to accommodate students and adults of all ages. Research materials include an extensive collection of books, manuscripts, ledgers, maps and photographs. The museum also house genealogy resources including thousands of local family files, cemetery listings, census records and directories.

Johnson Museum of Art

Opened in 1973, the Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University in Ithaca is home to one of the finest collections of ancient and modern art in Upstate New York. Designed by noted architect I.M. Pei, the building, a work of art itself, won the prestigious American Institute of Architects Honor award in 1975. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3FqzkN5i1Q

The museum’s collection includes over 35,000 works or art that span nearly six millennia of art history from around the world. A variety of exhibitions are held throughout the year. “Cosmos,” an ongoing computer controlled installation in the ceiling of the Mallin Sculpture Court, is a dazzling display of light imagery visible day and night.

Pumpelly House Estate

On the sloping banks of the Susquehanna River in Owego, stands a magnificent Georgian-style home and carriage house known as the Pumpelly House Estate. Built in 1902, by Gurden Pumpelly and his wife Kia, the house remained in the Pumpelly family for over 70 years and now serves as a bed and breakfast. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OH2rgnxWjdw
The Pumpelly family originally settled in Owego in the early 1800s. They were significant landowners, and the family prospered through their involvement in the timber and tobacco industries. By the late 1800’s, Gurden Pumpelly had achieved great success as a leaf tobacco farmer and dealer, and at the turn of the 19th century, he decided to retire with his wife to their grand new home in town,.

Evergreen Cemetery

Two stone pillars and a large iron gate mark the entrance to an impressive cemetery that overlooks the Susquehanna River and the town Owego below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLomerLbYZ0

Established in 1851, Evergreen Cemetery covers 51 acres of a beautifully landscaped and terraced hillside. Designed in the “Rural” style, small streams and stone fences meander across the grounds and a variety of stone monuments mark the sites where many of the past residence of Owego now rest in peace. One of the most visited gravesites in the cemetery is that of a young Indian maiden known as Sa-Sa-Na Loft, who died in a tragic train accident after visiting Owego in 1852. Located at one of the highest points in the cemetery, her monument overlooks the Susquehanna River Valley and the historic Village of Owego, offering one of the most picturesque views in New York’s Southern Tier.

Calaboose Grille

Built in 1910, the Tioga County Jail quickly drew criticism from locals. Many believed the prison was too attractive and cozy to be an effective deterrent to crime. A newspaper column from the time claimed that people would deliberately commit crimes in order to live in comfort in the new jail. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9JiGxEhaMY

Located on Court Street in Owego, the old county jail housed prisoners for over eighty years, until 1997 when it was purchased by a local developer and renovated. Four years later the repurposed building opened as a restaurant and bar.

Newark Valley Depot

It was 1870, when freight and passenger railroad service began in Newark Valley. The Southern Central Railroad, later the Lehigh Valley Railroad, brought continued service to the area for one hundred years. Today, the original train depot has been restored and now serves as a museum of railroad artifacts and memorabilia. An HO scale replica of the Tioga County segment of the Lehigh Valley Railroad is one of the most popular permanent exhibits of the museum. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7rYT1p0v_8

The depot is located in the picturesque rural village of Newark Valley on the East Branch of Owego Creek.

Owego's Courthouse Square

Built between 1871 and 1873, the Tioga County Courthouse is one of the oldest functioning courthouses in New York State. Today it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and stands as the centerpiece in Owego’s Courthouse Square. Located along the Susquehanna River at the gateway to the village, Courthouse Square provides a picture-postcard first impression of this historic community. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2YTawaPhLk

A Civil War Monument, erected in 1891, stands in front of the courthouse and at the northeast corner of the square sits a replica of the 1883 gazebo. Baker Memorial Fountain is one of the most distinctive and memorable features in Courthouse Square.

Owego Historical District

Located along the Susquehanna River, Owego is one of the most picturesque small towns in New York State. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Owego Central Historic District encompasses 85 buildings, including the 1828 Owego Academy, Village Firehouse, Courthouse and Post Office. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7OBl6JbTW4w

Quaint shops and restaurants make up the Riverow Commercial Complex, a collection of Greek Revival and Italianate buildings lining the river’s edge. Viewed from the highway across the river, the County Courthouse, Riverow Complex, tall church steeples, and Court Street Bridge combine to form a spectacular image of this historic and inviting small town. Recently voted the Coolest Small Town in America, Owego, with its historic district of architectural treasures is definitely one of the Coolest Small Towns on New York’s Path Through History.

Bement-Billings Farmstead Museum

In 1792, Asa Bement, Jr., a 28-year old blacksmith and Revolutionary War veteran traveled from Massachusetts to claim his new homestead along Owego Creek in Newark Valley. As one of the area’s earliest settlers, Bement worked hard to clear the untamed land and build a log home for his family. Over the years the family expanded the farm by enlarging the house, and building a sawmill, gristmill, and blacksmith shop on the property. The farm would become one of the most prosperous in the area, and Asa Bement, his family and their farmstead would play a significant role in the history of Tioga County. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MKAjH9oMNU

One hundred years later William Billings gained possession of the property and in 1977 his granddaughter deeded the house and property to the Newark Valley Historical Society.

Tioga County Historical Society Museum

Tioga County is rich in history. From American Indians and early pioneers, to local businesses and industry, to famous residents and family histories, this history can all be discovered and researched at the Tioga County Historical Society Museum, located along the Susquehanna River in historic Owego, New York. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGJBLy2k5Eg

Established in 1914, the Historical Society is committed to preserving and sharing the history of Tioga County, and today, the Historical Society Museum includes galleries for permanent and rotating exhibits. There is also a research library for genealogy and local history research. In addition, educational programs are regularly offered in the museum auditorium.

Market Street Historic District

In 1972, Hurricane Agnes devastated the downtown area of in the city of Corning. Not to be defeated by Mother Nature, the people of Corning came together to repair their city and grow as a community. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V9c-j5eTKo

The Market Street Historic District was created in 1974 and is recognized as part of the National Register of Historic Places. Focused on the area’s long industrial history, this district encompasses a variety of architectural styles amidst buildings that have moved from industrial to retail. In 2000, the boundaries of the district were enlarged and it now includes part of the Gaffer District—a term based on the glassblowing history of Corning.

Glenn H. Curtiss Museum

The Glenn H. Curtiss Museum, which celebrates the memory of a pioneer of the land and air is located just a few miles south of Hammondsport in Steuben County. Born in Hammondsport in 1878, Glenn Curtiss became the fastest man on earth in 1907, when he reached 136 miles per hour his revolutionary motorcycle. Not content with his success on the ground, the next year Curtiss set his sights on the sky. As a member of the Aerial Experiment Association, Curtiss piloted his first plan in 1908, and spent the next few years developing better avionics technology. Curtiss later pioneered the design of seaplanes and became know as the father of Naval aviation.

Stony Brook State Park

Located near the site of a former Native American settlement, Stony Brook State Park in Steuben County offers visitors a variety of ways to enjoy the great outdoors. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAD-alqoNuk

At the start of the 19th century, the first pioneers to the area found the rapid waters of Stony Brook Creek ripe for early mill operations. Eventually, local residents developed a private park around the creek and its series of waterfalls. The arrival of the railroad in the 1880s turned the surrounding community into a popular summer destination and the remnants of former train trestles as still visible in the park. However, as tourism declined the park fell into disrepair, and the state purchased it in 1928.

Benjamin Patterson Inn

Located in Corning, the Benjamin Patterson Inn once gave weary travelers on New York’s frontier a comfortable place to rest and relax. Built in 1796 by Benjamin and Sarah Patterson, the inn sat along the old Williamson Road, now US Route 15, and the Chemung River. These two arteries of travel brought countless visitors to the Patterson’s Inn. However, during the 20th century the inn slowly fell into disrepair. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fl9F5EVnFkE

In 1976, the Corning Painted Post Historical Society rescued the former inn and restored it to its former colonial glory, including full period furniture and belongings.

Corning Museum of Glass

In 1851, Armory Houghton founded the Bay State Glass Co. in Somerville, Massachusetts. Seventeen years later, the company, now under a new name, relocated to Corning, New York. Corning Glass Works, now Corning Incorporated, has continued to produce high quality glass at this location for over 140 years. In 1951, to celebrate its 100th anniversary, the company created the Corning Museum of Glass; one of the largest museums dedicated solely to telling the history and heritage of one product — glass.

Steuben County Historical Society

This graceful brick structure on West Morris Street in the town of Bath has a long and storied history. The impressive home was built 1828, by John Magee, a prominent member of the burgeoning community. It remained a private residence for 65 years, until the Davenport Library occupied the space in 1893. In 1999, the building became the headquarters of the Steuben County Historical Society. Today, the historical society continues its mission to collect and preserve the historical artifacts of Steuben County and to make its collections relevant to the community through exhibits, lectures, and special educational events.

Costa Flying Service

From inventors of aviation technology to gliders that soar above the valleys, Steuben County is rich in aviation history. The Costa Flying Service, located at the Corning-Painted Post Airport, has been in operation for 80 years. Founded in the1930s by aviation pioneer, Joseph A. Costa, the Costa Flying Service has provided all ranges of air travel and education for the Corning area. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EgKrSq4ihI
As New York’s oldest flying service, Costa continues to take visitors up into the clouds and give them a birds-eye-view of our region’s many natural wonders. Visitors can also choose to grab the controls for themselves and learn to soar with the birds.

Pinnacle State Park

The beautiful vistas of the Canisteo River Valley are on full display at Pinnacle State Park near Addison in Steuben County. Here visitors can enjoy a unique blend tranquil relaxation and sportsmanship as this picturesque upstate destination. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCuYAPiTHh8

A member of New York’s robust state park system, Pinnacle offers park goers both breathtaking views and number of recreational activities. Golfers will enjoy a round on the challenging nine-hole golf course, while hikers can tackle the eleven miles of trails that transverse the park. And in the winter the park is open to cross-county skiers.

Greyton H. Taylor Wine Museum

In the heart of winemaking country, in the Finger Lakes region, stands a unique museum dedicated to the history and beauty of an ancient enterprise. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_G7IRjISzY

In 1966, Walter Taylor opened Bully Hill Vineyards at Hammondsport in Steuben County. A year later, two additional buildings were opened as the “Finger Lakes Wine Museum.” In 1972, Taylor renamed the museum after his father, Greyton H. Taylor. In one building, called the Cooper Shop, visitors can study a large collection of tools used in the barrel and winemaking industries.

International Motor Racing Research Center

Located in a town where American motor racing holds court, The International Motor Racing Research Center, on Decatur Street in the Village of Watkins Glen, houses an impressive collection of automotive history and memorabilia. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXCv7b8vQnQ

The center opened its doors to the public in 1999, and today continues its mission to be a world-class leader in the collection and preservation of motor racing heritage. Housed in a two-story brick building, the research center’s collection contains thousands of books, manuscripts, periodicals, and visual works from the history of both amateur and professional motor racing. Whether for the casual visitor or the ardent student of motor sports, the International Motor Racing Research Center offers a wonderful opportunity to learn while having fun along New York’s Path Through History. Photos Courtesy of:
International Motor Racing Research Library

True Love Schooner

In the early days of the twentieth century, the social elite of the world built and sailed magnificent pleasure boats to and from their vacation play-lands. Those days may seem a world away but on Seneca Lake in Schuyler County visitors can travel back to the jazz era when they take an excursion cruise on the “True Love” Schooner. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3RdI8JwgCs

Berthed in Watkins Glen, this 1926 John Alden Malabar VII Schooner has been lovingly restored to its former glory. In the 1950s, The True Love sailed the seas of the Caribbean, and die-hard moviegoers will recognize it as the vessel that Bing Crosby and Grace Kelly sailed on in the film High Society. Today, the True Love sails on Seneca Lake, and visitors can once again feel the breeze through their hair and the mist of the waves on their face at this water bound stop on New York’s Path Through History.

Catharine Valley Trail

In the heart of Schuyler County, nestled just south of Seneca Lake, is Catharine Valley Trail. Here both lovers of nature and history can come together to enjoy the serene beauty of the upstate area. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4wXhyUdwIE

Visitors can trek the nine-mile long trail, which follows abandoned rail lines and former Chemung Canal towpaths, as they traverse through several wildlife habitats in the beautiful outdoors. The trail accommodates both pedestrians and bicyclers, and in the winter months the path is open to cross-county skiers and snowshoers. In the near future the trail will be extended in length and visitors will be able to walk from Watkins Glen to Horseheads.

Watkins Glen State Park

In the heart of the Finger Lakes region lays a magnificent series of gorges and waterfalls that highlight the beauty and power of nature to the visitors of the Watkins Glen State Park in Schuyler County. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N75jau2mQWI

Opened in 1863, the park was first operated as a privately run tourist resort. In 1906, the park was purchased by the State of New York and has evolved into one of the States most popular public attractions. Park visitors can follow a two-mile trail as it snakes its way through a four hundred foot change in elevation, and witness the beauty of nineteen different waterfalls like the Cavern Cascade with its beautiful vistas. The Glen’s camping grounds, Olympic size pool and other amenities help make the stay memorable, but the opportunity to watch thunderous waters as they power their way toward the bottom of the glen cutting through rock and stone make the visit unforgettable.

Watson

In the fall of 1914, Thomas John Watson was a broken man. Fired from a job he loved and convicted of a crime he claimed to be innocent of, his future looked bleak. But Watson would turn it all around by rebuilding his life and creating one of the world’s most influential and successful companies, IBM. Watson, a new documentary film from WSKG’s Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Brian Frey, tells the fascinating story of Watson’s rise from an impoverished childhood to a player on the world’s stage. Watson focuses on the history of IBM’s birth in Endicott, New York, and on how the company grew and evolved along with the lives and dreams of the children of the immigrants who came to the region a half century earlier.

The Flood of ’35

On Sunday evening, July 7, 1935, the skies north of the Southern Tier of New York State opened up, dumping more than 11 inches of rain in some areas, and inundating the rivers, lakes, and streams throughout the valley. The terrible chain of events that followed would devastate small towns and cities alike, destroying hundreds of home and properties, and claim more than 50 lives. It would become the worst natural disaster in the history of the Southern Tier. Winner of two New York State Emmy Awards, The Flood of ’35 utilizes rare film footage, hundreds of photographs and first-person accounts to tell the story of that horrible night and the days that followed, days that changed lives and the Southern Tier forever. Buy the DVD

Southern Tier Memory Store 3

Preserves in word and image an abundance of objects and events. In the third program in the series: “46-Quart Cans and some Passengers” – the milk trains; “The Standard Herbal Remedies” – Dr. Kilmer’s Swamp Root and other medicinal products; “Hi, Sweety” – Mr. Willoby and Igy; and “Another Side of the Tracks” – Oneonta’s Delaware and Hudson Railroad’s Susquehanna Division. Buy the DVD

Southern Tier Memory Store 2

A series of remembrances of extraordinary events and everyday life in the Southern Tier of New York featuring: Elmira’s Eldridge Park, once called “the playground of the Southern Tier”; Lackawanna Railroad Trains on the Ithaca-Owego line that negotiated the hills via an unusual double switchback; more than 1,000 people paddling home-made rafts 11 miles down the Susquehanna River in the Owego to Nichols raft race; and Rothschild’s department store in Ithaca. Buy the DVD

Southern Tier Memory Store 1

Offering a nostalgic look at the Southern Tier of New York’s landmarks and institutions and how they have changed or simply “are no more.” Included in program #1 are the Triplets baseball team, the Lackawanna Train Station, Ithaca’s Mutt Dog Parade of the 1930s, the Triple Cities-area Pig Stand restaurants and WNBF-TV (the original Channel 12). Buy the DVD