Diving into myth with poet Jennifer Crow

Off The Page from WSKG · Off the Page – Jennifer Crow

Jennifer Crow has been writing poetry since she was a little girl. Her poems explore the edges of time and space, and of myth and lore. Her poetry has appeared in many print and electronic places over the past quarter of a century, including Analog Science Fiction, Uncanny Magazine, Kaleidotrope and more. Her 2020 poem “Still” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She talks with host Crystal Sarakas about writing and pushing the edges of comfort in her poetry.

An annual tradition is back

The Madrigal Choir of Binghamton returns to its annual tradition of Lessons and Carols for Christmas.  Artistic Director Bruce Borton joins us to talk about the wide variety of music presented in this free concert at Trinity Memorial Episcopal Church in Binghamton. Photo credit: Madrigal Choir of Binghamton

500 years of fashion created from paper

“Isabelle de Borchgrave: Fashioning Art from Paper” is an exhibit on display through January 9, 2022 in the Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute Museum. Deputy Director and Chief Curator Stephen Harrison joins us to describe these historically accurate fashions, fabricated from paper.  

Photo credit: Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute

The Southern Tier Singers’ Collective performs music from a rare manuscript

Two years ago Binghamton University acquired a famous manuscript of music from the Convent of La Crocetta in Florence, Italy.  Associate Professor of Musicology Paul Schleuse tells the story of its journey from its origin in 1543 to Binghamton University.  Then the Southern Tier Singers’ Collective, prepared by William Culverhouse, performs a selection of excerpts from the manuscript.

A story of addiction, recovery and songwriting in Mary Gauthier’s “Saved By A Song”

Off The Page from WSKG · Off the Page – Mary Gauthier

Mary Gauthier was twelve years old when she was given her Aunt Jenny’s old guitar and taught herself to play with a Mel Bay basic guitar workbook. Music offered her a window to a world where others felt the way she did. Songs became lifelines to her, and she longed to write her own, one day. Then, for a decade, while struggling with addiction, Gauthier put her dream away and her call to songwriting faded. It wasn’t until she got sober and went to an open mic with a friend did she realize that she not only still wanted to write songs, she needed to.

Music from the 16th century is heard once more

The Southern Tier Singers’ Collective presents excerpts from a 16th century manuscript created for the Convent of La Crocetta in Florence. Paul Schleuse describes its creation and its mysterious journey from Italy to South America, and the exciting story of how it was acquired by Binghamton University, then conductor William Culverhouse continues the story with how it got from the page to the singers.  

Photo credit: Binghamton University and the Southern Tier Singers’ Collective

The BPO introduces recent music of a new composer, plus two familiar works

In its second concert of the season, the Binghamton Philharmonic presents “Ascend”, a program including music by Richard Wagner, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and emerging composer Jessie Montgomery (pictured above).  Music Director Daniel Hege joins us to talk about discovering the music of Jessie Montgomery, the astonishing artistry of Mozart’s Symphony No.41, and Wagner’s Christmas present to his wife, and the conductor who taught himself to play the trumpet in the middle of a lake so that he could participate in the premiere.  

Photo credit: Binghamton Philharmonic and Alice G. Patterson

Jurassic Park meets Dungeons and Dragons in Carrie Vaughn’s Questland

When an eccentric billionaire loses control of his island resort-slash-theme park, literature professor Addie Cox is an unlikely choice to help fix the situation. But it’s no ordinary theme park: this is pure wizardry come to life, with unicorns, talking rabbits – and murder. The book is called Questland, a mad mashup of Jurassic Park and Dungeons and Dragons. Bestselling author Carrie Vaughn nerds out with host Crystal Sarakas about all things geek on the latest episode of Off the Page.

GOP claims victory as 3 ballot props fail

Republicans and Conservatives are claiming victory in the rejection of three ballot proposals that would have allowed mail-in voting in New York, same-day voter registration, and made changes to the state’s redistricting process.

A Busy Actor Brings Her Storytelling Stand-up Comedy to the Firehouse Stage

You’ve heard her on Snap Judgment or possibly seen her on shows like Dead to Me, American Horror Story, The Middle, or Curb Your Enthusiasm.  Jen Kober brings her hilarious award-winning stories to the Firehouse Stage on Saturday, October 23. She talks about growing up in Louisiana entertaining her mother, her friends and eventually, audiences.  

Photo credit: Firehouse Stage