New York’s Fracking Ban Isn’t All It’s Cracked Up To Be

Print More
267e3241-41e1-4b34-8b1a-a778eb6f6044

Roz Gitt from Warwick, New York, protests in front of the construction site for the new CPV natural gas plant in Wawayanda.

In 2014, Gov. Andrew Cuomo made a bold statement by banning hydraulic fracturing in the Empire State, declaring alongside his health commissioner that “no child should live near” a shale-gas well because of its potential harm. 

The governor’s proclamation made him a hero among environmentalists and persona non grata in the oil and gas industry. Energy in Depth, an industry-funded website, criticized Cuomo for basing the moratorium on dubious science “to kowtow to Yoko Ono, Mark Ruffalo, and all of the environmental pressure groups in New York.”

In truth, though, the picture is murkier, and Cuomo’s ban is less than absolute. Moratorium notwithstanding, New York is still reaping the rewards of fracking, importing shale gas from neighboring Pennsylvania and preparing to process it in a mammoth power plant under construction 65 miles northwest of New York City.

Read full story here. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *