Nana (left) gets her birth control implant checked by Dr. Jean Rangomana during the Marie Stopes International mobile clinic in Besakoa, Madagascar, on April 9, 2018. Abortion is illegal under all circumstances in Madagascar, and Trump administration policies led to shortages of birth control there, health workers say.

BESAKOA, MADAGASCAR – APRIL 9:
Nana, left, gets her birth control implant checked by Dr. Jean Rangomana during the Marie Stopes International mobile clinic in Besakoa, Madagascar on April 9, 2018. He estimated that he would see at least 50 women seeking family planning during the clinic that day.

She has two children and recently got a birth control implant, which is effective for three years, from one of Marie Stopes International’s mobile clinics. She said that she was surprised, but happy about the first pregnancy. However, the second pregnancy scared her. She is a single mom who cultivates cassava. “I’m not married so I don’t have anyone to help me raise my child,” she said. “I think I am too old and have been single too long [to get married].” “Some people are sad, but it is hard to help me,” she said of being a single mom. “They are sad about how I will raise my kids without a man to get food and clothes.”

Nana came to this clinic to get a check-up. Because she was the first in Betsingilo to get the implant, she has helped ease other women’s concerns about the potential pain and side effects of getting the implant. She said she was able to go right back to working in her field after its insertion. Nana has only one name.
(Photo by Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post via Getty Images)