In the Defense of Food

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In the Defense of Food airs on WSKG TV December 30th at 9pm.

Join New York Times best-selling author Michael Pollan on a fascinating journey to answer the question: What should I eat to be healthy? Busting myths and misconceptions, the two-hour film In Defense of Food reveals how common sense and old-fashioned wisdom can help us rediscover the pleasures of eating and at the same time reduce our risks of falling victim to diet related diseases.“Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” With that seven-word maxim, US-based journalist Michael Pollan (The Omnivore’s Dilemma) distills a career’s worth of reporting into a prescription for reversing the damage being done to people’s health by today’s industrially driven Western diet. In Defense of Food debunks the daily media barrage of conflicting claims about nutrition. Traveling the globe and exploring the supermarket aisles to illustrate the principles of his bestselling “eater’s manifesto,” Pollan offers a clear answer to one of the most confounding and urgent questions of our time: What should I eat to be healthy?

A selection of Michael Pollan’s Food Rules:

Eat only foods that will eventually rot.

Eat only foods that have been cooked by humans.

Avoid foods you see advertised on television.

Eat mostly plants.

Treat meat as a flavoring or special occasion food.

If it came from a plant, eat it. If it was made in a plant, don’t.

Eat your colors – that is, eat as many different kinds of plants as possible.

Use smaller plates and glasses.

Serve the vegetables first.

Make water your beverage of choice.

Stop eating before you’re full.

Eat more like the French do.

Try to spend as much time enjoying the meal as it took to prepare it.

Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.

Break the rules once in a while.

Michael Pollan is the author of five New York Times Best Sellers: The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, The Botany of Desire (which was also adapted for PBS in 2009), In Defense of Food,Food Rules and, mostly recently, Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. In 2010 he was named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time Magazine.