Oscar Barton

On January 1st, 1863, as the Civil War entered another hellish year, President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in areas under rebellion and allowing the federal government to recruit African Americans into the Union Army, was enacted. At the time, thirty-year-old Oscar Barton was living in Vestal, New York. A descendent of free-blacks from Rhode Island, Barton’s grandfather had been a soldier during the American Revolution and Oscar would follow in his grandfather’s footsteps. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9P1BxnI0A7M

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History: http://paththroughhistory.iloveny.com/
WSKG’s Path Through History: http://www.wskg.org/PTH
Tioga County Historical Society: http://tiogahistory.org/

Photos Courtesy of:
Tioga County Historical Society
Library of Congress

Lt. Col. George J. Haley

During the fast paced aerial dogfights over Europe during World War II, the first all-black fighter group known as the Tuskegee Airmen would make history and ultimately help break the military color barrier. Lt. Col. George Haley, of Bath, NY would be one of the 900 elite fighter pilots in this historic group. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXXhhQzpC1g

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
Steuben County Historical Society

Photos Courtesy of:
Steuben County Historical Society
Library of Congress

Peter Webb

In 1805, John J. Speed brought a young 13-year-old slave named Peter from Virginia to the Town of Caroline, New York near Ithaca. After arriving in New York, Peter continued to serve the Speed family, but he also possessed a growing desire to be free. In 1813, Peter made an arrangement with his master that would allow him to purchase his own freedom. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLUJc9rUbkg

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
The History Center in Tompkins County

Photos Courtesy of:
The History Center in Tompkins County
Library of Congress
Wikimedia Commons

Watch Both Parts of Ken Burns's 'Jackie Robinson' Online

Jack Roosevelt Robinson rose from humble origins to cross baseball’s color line and become one of the most beloved men in America. A fierce integrationist, Robinson used his immense fame to speak out against the discrimination he saw on and off the field, angering fans, the press, and even teammates who had once celebrated him for “turning the other cheek.” JACKIE ROBINSON, a new two-part, four-hour documentary directed by Ken Burns, Sarah Burns and David McMahon, chronicles the life and times of Jackie Robinson. Watch Part I:

Watch Part II:

 

Main Image: Courtesy of Hulton Archive Getty Images.

New Film From Ken Burns Tells the Story of Jackie Robinson

JACKIE ROBINSON, a new two-part, four-hour documentary directed by Ken Burns, Sarah Burns and David McMahon, will air April 11 and 12, at 9:00 p.m. on WSKG TV. The film chronicles the life and times of Robinson, his breaking of baseball’s color barrier and his lifelong fight for equality on and off the field. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mr5P8dcn3n4

“Jackie Robinson is the most important figure in our nation’s most important game,” said Ken Burns. “He gave us our first lasting progress in civil rights since the Civil War and, ever since I finished my BASEBALL series in 1994, I’ve been eager to make a stand-alone film about the life of this courageous American. There was so much more to say not only about Robinson’s barrier-breaking moment in 1947, but about how his upbringing shaped his intolerance for any form of discrimination and how after his baseball career, he spoke out tirelessly against racial injustice, even after his star had begun to dim.”

In addition to interviews with Robinson’s widow, Rachel, and their surviving children, Sharon and David, the film features interviews with President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama; former Dodgers teammates Don Newcombe, Carl Erskine and Ralph Branca; writers Howard Bryant and Gerald Early; Harry Belafonte; Tom Brokaw; and Carly Simon.

Live Stream 'Civil Rights Today' in Your Classroom

Electronic Field Trip: Lessons from the American Civil Rights Movement
Join New York Times best-selling author and youth advocate Wes Moore as he leads a special youth town hall discussion about race, racism, and other issues of equality. Streaming live on Thursday, February 25, 2016 from 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Throughout 2015, events across the nation focused attention on concerns in minority communities and racial perceptions in America, resulting in renewed public dialogue about race relations and other issues of social justice. This ongoing dialogue includes not only questions about the policing of black communities, but also educational inequality and the school-to-prison pipeline, the LGBTQ rights movement, immigration reform, and the rebuilding of our communities. This field trip is brought to you by Alabama Public Television and American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen.  
Register for Episode Seven, Civil Rights Today.  

 
Webinar: Illuminating Social Justice Issues Through Authentic Student Projects
Join PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovator Michael Hernandez as he explores how teachers of all grade levels can design meaningful social justice projects.

The Nathaniel Dett Chorale Performs in Ithaca and Oneonta

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The Nathaniel Dett Chorale is performing at Ithaca College and as part of the Oneonta Concert Association series this week.  They are Canada’s first professional choral group dedicated to Afrocentric music of all styles, including classical, spiritual, gospel, jazz, folk and blues, and was named in honor of the late-19th-century composer and musicologist Nathanial Dett.  We talked with conductor Brainerd Blyden-Taylor who was in Toronta before the Chorale started their tour. http://wskg.org/audio/nathanieldett.mp3

 

Photo credit: Nathaniel Dett Chorale

The 1961 Heisman Trophy Winner | #tbt

In today’s throwback Thursday photograph, President Kennedy greets the 1961 Heisman Trophy winner Ernie Davis. The photo was taken at a reception sponsored by the National Association of Manufacturers held at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City. As a young man, Ernie Davis attended Elmira Free Academy in Elmira, New York. Davis excelled at a number of different sports, but had a natural athletic gift for football. In 1958, Davis became a running back for Syracuse University and was selected Most Valuable Player in 1960.