'Wild Kratts Alaska' Movie Event

While creature adventuring in Alaska, one of Aviva’s inventions falls overboard and attaches to a sockeye salmon – jumpstarting a wild chase upriver through the wilderness. The Whole Kratts track the incredible salmon run – a quest fraught with obstacles and amazing creature connections around every bend. Premieres on WSKG TV on July 24, 2017 at 7:30am and 3:30pm. https://youtu.be/J0tvSY4wUDE

Fishery Reductions Worry Anglers

photo: Julia Botero/WRVO News  

Story by: Veronica Volk

Every year, the Salmon River Fish Hatchery in Altmar, raises millions of fish to be stocked in Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. The hatchery raises several species of fish, but their pride and joy is the chinook salmon. Each fall, employees harvest millions of eggs, fertilize them, incubate them, and raise the fish until they’re ready to be released into the wild. This time of year, Les Resseguie and his team are overseeing millions of chinook eggs — each about the size of a pea — incubating in big trays in the hatchery’s basement. “You can start to see their eyes, you can start to see the major blood vessels, and you’ll actually see them wiggling around a little bit in there,” Resseguie says.

Animal Misfits

A kakapo, the world’s heaviest and only flightless parrot. Photo credit: ©Shane McInnes

Nature’s Animal Misfits airs on WSKG TV December 30th at 8pm. Alongside the fastest, strongest, smartest animals are nature’s misfits, odd, bizarre and unlikely creatures that at first glance seem ill-equipped for survival. Left at the starting line in the race for life, these are the apparent losers in the story of evolution, yet somehow they manage to cling to life and in some cases even thrive. There is great diversity in the animal world, but it seems those species known for their speed, intelligence and strength are often singled out and celebrated, while creatures who may look or act differently are overlooked.

Making North America | Life

Tonight at 9p.m. on WSKG TV-  NOVA Making North America | Life, tells the intertwined story of life and the landscape in North America. Host Kirk Johnson travels to the North Dakota Badlands and the southern Utah desert to answer the riddle of why so many dinosaurs flourished there, and to see traces of the asteroid that wiped them out. With the dinosaurs gone, mammals flourished and the ancient forests became home to some of the earliest primates. Kirk unravels the mystery of why they too disappeared, leaving North America mostly primate-free until the arrival of humans millions of years later. How did life emerge on our primeval continent? Why was North America home to so many iconic dinosaurs like T. rex? And how did a huge sea filled with giant marine reptiles end up covering Kansas?

E.O. Wilson – Of Ants and Men

At age 78, E.O. Wilson is still going through his “little savage” phase of boyhood exploration of the natural world. In “E.O. Wilson- Of Ants and Men” PBS profiles this soft-spoken Southerner and Harvard professor, who is an acclaimed advocate for ants, biological diversity, and the controversial extension of Darwinian ideas to human society. E.O. Wilson – Of Ants and Men is a two-hour film about the life and extraordinary scientific odyssey of one of America’s greatest living thinkers, E.O Wilson. It is an exciting journey of ideas, but also an endearing portrait of a remarkable man; often dubbed “a Darwin for the modern day.” Starting with his unusual childhood in Alabama, it chronicles the lifelong love for the natural world that led him to Harvard and the studies that would establish him as the world’s foremost authority on ants. But that was just the beginning.

Talk Like a Firefly

Science Friday: If you’re lucky enough to live where fireflies flash at night, then you have surely seen their magical illuminations on warm summer evenings. But did you know that by observing fireflies while they are flashing, you can learn to communicate with them? If you haven’t already, watch the Science Friday Video “In a Flash: Firefly Communication” for a little background on how fireflies use light to communicate:

By watching and comparing fireflies all across the country, scientists have been able to map out the unique flash patterns of male and female fireflies of different species. Dr. John E. Lloyd, an entomologist at the University of Florida, featured in the video above, was one of the first to do this extensively for North American species of firefly in the genus Photinus. Check out these family friendly activities from Science Friday.