Canada Day Muted As Nation Reckons With Residential School Legacy

On July 1, 1867, the confederation known historically as the Dominion of Canada became official with four provinces, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. Six more provinces joined between 1870 and 1949. The celebration of Canada Day is complicated this year. Many people are not celebrating at all, and others are celebrating differently due to recent discoveries of the bodies of hundreds of indigenous children in unmarked graves at former Indian Residential Schools in British Columbia and Saskatchewan. On May 27, 215 bodies were discovered at a former residential school site in Kamloops, British Columbia.

Despite Border Closure, Thousand Islands’ Tourism Persists

SYRACUSE, NY (WRVO) – When Corey Fram looks out of his window at work he sees both the American and Canadian flags flying high. “It’s on my property in the United States, but we carry two flags here, a lot of places and that means something to us,” said Fram, the director of the Thousand Islands International Tourism Council. The US-Canadian border remains closed until June 21, when it will be readdressed. Fram said the lack of communication between the two countries throughout the pandemic has really hurt border towns within the Thousand Islands. “There just seems to be no international discussion between the United States on what easing these border restrictions are going to look like,” he said.

Canada Behind Other Countries On Vaccination Efforts

Across Quebec, 648,663 people had been vaccinated against COVID-19 as of Friday. In Quebec, residents aged 75 or greater have been able to make a vaccination appointment since last week.

U.S.-Canada Border Remains Closed

“This Administration has to understand that we won’t have a healthy economy until we have a healthy country and that starts with taking this virus seriously.”

The Nathaniel Dett Chorale Performs in Ithaca and Oneonta

The Nathaniel Dett Chorale is performing at Ithaca College and as part of the Oneonta Concert Association series this week.  They are Canada’s first professional choral group dedicated to Afrocentric music of all styles, including classical, spiritual, gospel, jazz, folk and blues, and was named in honor of the late-19th-century composer and musicologist Nathanial Dett.  We talked with conductor Brainerd Blyden-Taylor who was in Toronta before the Chorale started their tour. http://wskg.org/audio/nathanieldett.mp3

 

Photo credit: Nathaniel Dett Chorale

Moose: Life of a Twig Eater

Nature Moose: Life of a Twig Eater airs on WSKG TV on February 10, 2016 at 8pm. There is a growing problem in North America affecting moose, the largest species of the deer family. Whether they make their home in the Canadian Rockies or in Minnesota, moose populations are declining at a rapid rate. One reason is that many of the newborn calves are not surviving their first year. In order to find out why, one intrepid cameraman spends a year documenting the life of a moose calf and its mother to understand what it takes to survive.