In A Word featuring Ishion Hutchinson & Carole Boyce Davies, In Conversation

In A Word featuring Ishion Hutchinson & Carole Boyce Davies, In Conversation
Wednesday, May 1, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Carole Boyce Davies is a professor of English and Africana Studies at Cornell University. She has held distinguished professorships at a number of institutions, including the Herskovits Professor of African Studies and Professor of Comparative Literary Studies and African American Studies at Northwestern University. She is the author of Black Women, Writing and Identity: Migrations of the Subject and Left of Karl Marx: The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones. Her most recent monograph is Caribbean Spaces: Escape Routes from Twilight Zones and a children’s book, Walking. Ishion Hutchinson was born in Port Antonio, Jamaica.

The Robert Chasen Memorial Poetry Reading by Claudia Rankine

The Robert Chasen Memorial Poetry Reading by Claudia Rankine, Poet & Writer
Thursday, April 18, 5:00 p.m.
Alice Statler Auditorium, Statler Hall

The Spring 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series comes to a close with a reading by poet & writer Claudia Rankine. Recipient of the 2016 MacArthur Fellowship, Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry. Rankine is the recipient of the Poets & Writers’ Jackson Poetry Prize and fellowships from the Lannan Foundation and the National Endowment of the Arts. Rankine’s bestselling book, Citizen: An American Lyric, was the winner of the 2015 Forward Prize for Best Collection, the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry (it was also a finalist in the criticism category, making it the first book in the award’s history to be a double nominee), the NAACP Image Award, the PEN Open Book Award, and the LA Times Book Award for poetry. Citizen also holds the distinction of being the only poetry book to be a New York Times bestseller in the nonfiction category.

Reading by Elissa Washuta

Reading by Elissa Washuta, Nonfiction Writer
Thursday, March 14, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

The Spring 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series continues with a reading by nonfiction writer Elissa Washuta. Elissa Washuta is a member of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe and a nonfiction writer. She is the author of Starvation Mode and My Body Is a Book of Rules, named a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. With Theresa Warburton, she is co-editor of the anthology Shapes of Native Nonfiction: Collected Essays by Contemporary Writers. She has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Artist Trust, 4Culture, Potlatch Fund, and Hugo House.

The 40th Anniversary of the Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture by Suzanne Akbari: “Chaucer’s Periodization”

The 40th Anniversary of the Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture by Suzanne Akbari
“Chaucer’s Periodization”
Thursday, February 28, 4:30 p.m.
Guerlac Room, A.D. White House

To talk about “Chaucer’s periodization” often means to ask how we ourselves think of Chaucer: as a quintessentially “medieval” poet, or as a harbinger of the “modern.” Instead, this lecture explores how Chaucer and his contemporaries saw their own place in time, focusing on the House of Fame, the Knight’s Tale, the Man of Law’s Tale, and Troilus and Criseyde, and asking questions such as the following: Does Chaucer present a linear or a cyclical view of history? To what extent does each national history stand on its own? And what’s the place of the individual subject within Chaucer’s periodization? Suzanne Conklin Akbari is Director of the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto. She has written books on optics and allegory (Seeing Through the Veil) and European views of Islam and the Orient (Idols in the East), and edited collections on travel literature (Marco Polo), Mediterranean Studies (A Sea of Languages), and somatic histories (The Ends of the Body).

Communicating Climate Change: A Guide for Educators

In a Chats in the Stacks book talk, Anne K. Armstrong, PhD student in the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), will present Communicating Climate Change: A Guide for Educators (Cornell University Press), coauthored with Marianne E. Krasny, DNR professor, and Jonathon P. Schuldt, associate professor in the Department of Communication. Armstrong will discuss how to provide educators with tools for understanding the socio-political contexts and complex science of climate change. She will also talk about formulating educational programs in classrooms of all levels to foster both dialogue and action in response to climate change. This book talk is supported by the Mary A. Morrison Public Education Fund for Mann Library. Light refreshments will be served.

The Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading by Robert Morgan & Ernesto Quiñónez

The Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading by Robert Morgan & Ernesto Quiñónez
Thursday, February 7, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall
The Spring 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series kicks off with the Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading featuring Robert Morgan, poet & novelist, and Ernesto Quiñónez, writer. Robert Morgan is the author of fifteen books of poems, most recently Terroir and Dark Energy. He has published eleven works of fiction, including Gap Creek and Chasing the North Star. Nonfiction works include Boone: A Biography and Lions of the West. Recipient of awards from the Guggenheim Foundation and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, he is a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers.

Cornell Graduate Students Say Their University Has A Mental Health Crisis

About one hundred Cornell graduate students gathered outside the Cornell Health Center on campus Wednesday afternoon. They were calling for an external review of the mental health services at the University. Students shared their own mental health struggles. They described not being taken seriously by faculty and having to go off campus to find therapists. They say getting appointments is difficult unless they are in crisis, suicidal or in academic trouble.

Composer Hugh McElyea Uses an Ancient Form to Portray Heroism and Sacrifice

Composer Hugh McElyea talks about his work ‘Tenebrae: The Passion of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’. This theatrical work uses the ancient service of Tenebrae to tell the story of the last hours of Lutheran pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer who could have fled Germany during the Nazi regime, but whose faith compelled him to stay and face imprisonment and eventual execution just days before the war ended.  

Photo credit: www.tenebraelive.com

A Geneticist’s Growing Season

What does a maize geneticist do? Explore the growing season of maize, and how scientists study the plant’s genetic diversity and connect it to the phenotypes they observe. Maize needs lots of sun and warm weather to grow. Seeds are usually planted in spring, in marked rows to identify each plant by its pedigree and genotype. In the mid-summer, when the plants are ready, scientists begin crossing the varieties of maize.