Without Child Care Bailout, Workforce Could Lose Women

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway announced she was stepping down from her position to look after her family. Working families across the country are figuring out how to provide care for their children with remote and hybrid schooling this year.

Travel In Upstate New York On The Rise

“We are seeing a lot of day- and long-weekend trips to the Finger Lakes, Thousand Islands, Adirondacks, and the Lake George area. State parks remain popular as the tourists enjoy hiking and being out in nature.”

Governor Says It’s Time To Talk About Reopening PA’s Economy, But Offers No Timeline

PA POST – Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf says it’s time to start talking about reopening the state’s economy, but during a Friday afternoon news conference, he avoided providing dates for when he will lift restrictions on Pennsylvania residents and businesses. “Unfortunately, we cannot flip a switch and reopen the commonwealth,” Wolf said. “There isn’t going to be one big day. We need to make smart, data-driven decisions, and we can’t be impulsive. We can’t be emotional.”

Starting next week, Wolf said he plans to describe specific steps for lifting restrictions in Pennsylvania. Those steps will follow guidelines released by the Wolf administration on Friday that emphasize a data-driven approach to create quantifiable criteria and take into account conditions in different regions of the state.

PA’s Toilet Paper Manufacturers Flush With Demand

To meet the demand, the plant has delayed upgrades and maintenance on its equipment, reduced the number of products it makes, and reassigned non-manufacturing employees to positions on the production line.

With Backlog Affecting New York Brewers, Schumer Urges Action

A backlog on the federal level is hurting local brewers. Sen. Chuck Schumer brought that message to Rochester’s Genesee Brewery on Monday. Schumer said brewers are heavily regulated and must file applications with the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau in order to release new flavors, update labels or change the size of a bottle.

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As Tesla Stock Falls, Is There Cause For Concern Over New York Plant?

BUFFALO, NY (WBFO) – Shares of Tesla lost approximately nine percent of their value Friday, as the high-tech company moves forward amid concerns including a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation, comments made by founder Elon Musk and a report that Tesla may not, after all, purchase all the output from the Buffalo-based factory it now shares with Panasonic.

In Rarity For GOP, PA Congressman Pushes For Carbon Tax

STATE IMPACT PENNSYLVANIA – In a rare move for Republican lawmakers, U.S. Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick of Bucks County and Carlos Curbelo of Florida have teamed up to introduce a climate change bill — a big one.

Spectrum To Drop WSKG-TV In Tompkins, Cortland

Throughout the years, WSKG-TV has shown numerous programs including “NOVA: Making North America,” “American Experience,” news programs like “Frontline,” musical programs like “Expressions,” and it’s most popular locally produced show, “Let’s Polka!” Now, it looks like WSKG-TV will be having its last polka in Tompkins and Cortland counties. WSKG announced Spectrum plans to drop the TV station in the Ithaca and Cortland areas in the coming weeks. Read full story here.

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As Economy Changes, Lawmakers Look To Ensure PA Jobs Keep Up

(WSKG) — Retail and manufacturing jobs are on the decline–both in Pennsylvania, and around the country. So a state lawmaker is looking for ways to pinpoint exactly where those jobs are going–and how to stop the bleeding.  Democratic Representative Mike Schlossberg of Lehigh County said two factors stand out as major causes of job loss in Pennsylvania: automation in manufacturing, and the rise of online shopping. Since 2002, he said department stores jobs around the country have declined by about 25 percent. His office projects employers in the state could automate up to 280,000 of the state’s 560,000 manufacturing jobs over the next two decades. Schlossberg said the commonwealth should be figuring out how to adapt to that new economy.

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NY Lawmakers Hope To Reform Economic Development Contracts

One of the top issues remaining before the state Legislature adjourns for the summer is fixing problems in the state’s economic development contracts. That’s after a scandal led to federal corruption charges against nine former associates of Gov. Andrew Cuomo. A bill by State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli to reinstate the comptroller’s ability to oversee economic development contracts is gaining momentum in the Legislature. DiNapoli said for the past several years hundreds of millions of dollars in contracts connected to the governor’s Buffalo Billion and other projects were negotiated largely in secret without any outside monitoring. Those dealings led to nine former Cuomo associates, including the governor’s former closest aide and a highly paid former State University of New York official, being charged with felonies ranging from bribery to bid-rigging. The comptroller’s bill, would, among other things, restore oversight powers that his office held for nearly a century but lost in a law passed in 2011.

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Empire Center Questions NY Prevailing Wage Rule

A fiscal watchdog group is questioning the state’s century-old prevailing wage law for construction workers, saying it unnecessarily costs taxpayers billions of dollars a year in added expenses for big road, bridge and other projects. The Empire Center, a fiscally conservative budget watchdog group, looked at the state’s constitutionally protected prevailing wage law. It requires contractors on public projects to pay their workers the amounts set in unions’ collective bargaining agreements. The Empire Center’s E.J. McMahon said an analysis of federal data on wages paid finds the law’s interpretation is outdated and that New York may be paying more in taxpayer money than is necessary — up to 25 percent more for some projects in some regions of the state. “You’re talking about something that’s neither prevailing nor limited to the wage,” McMahon said.

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Small NY Cities Wonder Whether To Fund Stadiums

Public money is often used to fund stadium upgrades. Elected officials say it builds up a local economy by attracting businesses, who want to set up nearby, and people, who spend their dollars in the city. That claim is debated in major league cities around the country. But what about smaller cities, like Elmira and Binghamton? Could stadiums benefit those economies?

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Investing In Higher Ed Grows Jobs, Population

Among the winners in New York’s Regional Economic Development awards last month were colleges and universities. Binghamton University, Cornell University and Broome Community College combined to win nearly $700,000 through the economic development grants. The money will be spent on research labs, manufacturing and start-up business incubators. Amanda Knarr works for the American Institute for Economic Research. She said this kind of investment creates jobs.