Without Child Care Bailout, Workforce Could Lose Women

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway announced she was stepping down from her position to look after her family. Working families across the country are figuring out how to provide care for their children with remote and hybrid schooling this year.

Cuomo: Decision On Schools To Come In Early August

New York will decide if schools will reopen this fall in the first week of August, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Wednesday, and tasked districts across the state with coming up with plans in the event that they’re allowed to resume in-person learning.

State Senator Urges New York Governor To Lift Travel Ban So SUNY Swimmers Can Compete

More than a dozen student-athletes from three SUNY colleges have qualified to compete in the NCAA Division III national swimming and diving championships. There’s just one problem. The games are being held in Greensboro, North Carolina, and a ban on New York State-sponsored non-essential travel to that state remains in effect. A local State Senator is urging Governor Andrew Cuomo to lift that ban.

Binghamton Residents Rally Over Student Strip Searches

About 200 residents rallied Tuesday outside East Middle School in a call-out to Binghamton’s School District. The rally was a response to claims by four African-American girls that staff members strip searched them a couple of weeks ago for giddiness and possibly possessing drugs.

Young String Players Present Their Winter Concert

The Little Delaware Youth Ensemble presents their Winter Concert in two performances.  Conductor Uli Speth joins us to talk about the program and about the history of the ensemble, as well as an upcoming workshop for the group.  

Photo credit: Little Delaware Youth Ensemble

Free Workshop for PK-2 Teachers

Teachers, join us as we nurture curiosity and critical thinking with our littles! This virtual professional learning experience will provide tips on how to responsibly integrate media in the classroom for your early learners. How do you encourage an eagerness to explore in the classroom? A desire to learn? What are the best methods to keep students engaged and learning in the classroom?

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After Decade Of Debate, PA Passes New Graduation Requirements

KEYSTONE CROSSROADS – After much delay and consternation, Pennsylvania will change its high school graduation requirements. But the change won’t be as drastic as initially mapped out when state leaders first committed to revisions nearly a decade ago.

Wolf, Wagner Field Education Questions From Students

KEYSTONE CROSSROADS – No, it wasn’t a debate. But the two men vying to win Pennsylvania’s gubernatorial election did appear in Philadelphia Wednesday to answer the same set of five questions, one after the other. Their interrogators were elementary-aged children, and the questions revolved mostly around education.

Cornell Removes Professor From Teaching Post After Research Retracted

ROCHESTER, NY (WXXI) – Brian Wansink, the Cornell professor who authored six articles retracted by the Journal of the American Medical Association Wednesday, has been removed from all teaching and research at the university, and will retire at the end of this academic year.

Wolf Calls Wagner’s New Education Funding Proposal ‘Abracadabra Math’

Pennsylvania Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Wagner has a plan to pump an additional $1 billion into public schools without raising taxes. He says he’d do four things to make that happen: privatize the sale of alcohol, lease its liquor wholesale system, slash corporate welfare “that has no positive economic impact,” and reform the welfare system.

PA Governor Calls For Drastic School Funding Shake-Up

KEYSTONE CROSSROADS — Governor Tom Wolf called for a major change to the way Pennsylvania funds schools Friday, advocating for the state to distribute its largest pot of school money in a way that would benefit the majority of students in the state, but would likely cause deep cuts in many districts.

New York Lawmakers Push Anti-Bullying Measure

ALBANY, NY (WSKG) – A bipartisan group of state lawmakers is pushing for an anti-bullying measure that would require schools to tell parents when their child is being bullied, or if their son or daughter is behaving like a bully toward others.

Hear Here! | Hip-Hop and How it Got That Way

When you hear ‘Hip-Hop’ what comes to mind? DJs, MCs, beat-juggling, graffiti… Yep, you’ve got it! We’re going to explore the roots and music of hip-hop. Special guests Ben Ortiz of the Cornell Hip-Hop Conservancy and DJ ShockWave help us along the way.

As NY Police Make Arrests, Experts Say Lack Of Emotional Skills Can Cause School Threats

SYRACUSE, NY (WRVO) – Many school districts in central and northern New York have faced threats following the Florida high school shooting last month. It has resulted in school shutdowns and arrests of some students for making terroristic threats. As law enforcement aggressively investigates these incidents, some experts say it is a lack of emotional skills that is causing them.

Spectrum To Drop WSKG-TV In Tompkins, Cortland

Throughout the years, WSKG-TV has shown numerous programs including “NOVA: Making North America,” “American Experience,” news programs like “Frontline,” musical programs like “Expressions,” and it’s most popular locally produced show, “Let’s Polka!” Now, it looks like WSKG-TV will be having its last polka in Tompkins and Cortland counties. WSKG announced Spectrum plans to drop the TV station in the Ithaca and Cortland areas in the coming weeks. Read full story here.

Ex-Governor Looks Back At Sandusky Case, Fallout

HARRISBURG (WSKG) – In a rare interview, former Republican Governor Tom Corbett has returned to one of the issues that dogged him late in his lone term in office–the fallout from the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse case. Corbett told Radio PA “mistakes were made” in the handling of the situation. In the aftermath of Corbett’s loss to Democrat Tom Wolf, it was a common theory that the Republican’s seat on the Penn State Board of Trustees had hurt him politically. The board voted to fire Paterno for under-reporting Sandusky’s abuse. Corbett said he certainly sees a connection.

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More Flexible School Days Could Be The Future For New York

ROCHESTER (WXXI) – A possible change to school calendars would give districts more flexibility in scheduling. A proposal made by the New York State Education Department would switch from a ‘number of school days per year’ guideline, to hours per year. Right now, the department requires schools be in session 180 days a year, something that can easily get messed up by parent teacher conferences or snow days. Spokesperson for the Rochester City School District Carlos Garcia says this would also help college prep students who attend some classes at MCC. “So they can come in later, they can come in earlier etc.

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Committee Shuffle Could Impact PA’s School Choice Bill

HARRISBURG (WSKG) — A contentious proposal to let students use state money to pay for private school is getting another chance to make it onto the Senate floor.  Senate Bill 2 would create education savings accounts–a similar concept to private school vouchers–that would let students in the lowest-performing public schools use the money the state would have spent on their education for alternative school options, as well as related expenses like textbooks. It failed to pass the Senate Education Committee in a tie vote in late October, and is now scheduled to be reconsidered in the same committee Tuesday. However, Republican Senator Daniel Laughlin of Erie County, one of the only GOP lawmakers to vote against the bill in October, may be moving off the panel. That could change the outcome of the vote, though Laughlin maintains his likely departure is unrelated to the bill. “I can see why it looks the way it does,” he said.

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Study Finds Major Gaps In New York’s Special Education Spending

ROCHESTER (WXXI) – There are major gaps in special education spending in New York. A study by the New York State Association of School Business Officials found that spending in wealthier districts for special needs students was almost double the spending in more impoverished districts. 

“Special education spending in the lowest need districts is $43,635 per special education pupil while spending in the highest need districts is $25,823 per special education pupil,” wrote researchers of the study. And this translates into major gaps of achievement. 80 percent of special needs students in wealthier districts graduate, while just 40 percent of special needs students graduate from lower-income districts. They’re also less likely to score high on state testing.

Free PBS LearningMedia Webinar for Teachers

Join us for an educator webinar (preK-12) from PBS LearningMedia on how to integrate digital tools and public media into your classroom. Expand your digital toolkit and discover how PBS LearningMedia and its collection of over 120K standards-aligned resources can be integrated into meaningful learning experiences for your students. This free webinar will be held online on Tuesday, November 28 | 7:00pm – 8:00pm ET. Register Now!

American Graduate Day 2017

American Graduate Day returns to WSKG TV on Saturday, October 14, 2017 at 2:00pm. American Graduate Day 2017, supported by CPB, is a live, four-hour multi-platform broadcast that focuses on organizations and individuals keeping kids on the path to graduation. The event explores the importance of mentorship through the critical themes of early education, more and better learning, special needs, STEAM, dropout prevention and re-engagement, career readiness, and college completion. WSKG will also highlight the amazing dedication and work being done by local educators, our very own American Graduate Champions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qegt3PGUKrA

Viewers can participate in the event by asking questions and sharing ideas before and during the broadcast on Twitter and Facebook, using the hashtags #AmGrad and #UpstateGrad.

Shackled Legacy: Universities and the Slave Trade

A growing number of colleges and universities in the eastern United States are confronting their historic ties to the slave trade. Profits from slavery and related industries helped build some of the most prestigious schools in New England. In many Southern states, enslaved people built and maintained college campuses. This documentary focuses on three universities — Harvard, Georgetown and the University of Virginia — as they grapple with a deeply troubling chapter in their vaunted histories. At the crux of the story is the question of how these institutions might make amends for the ways they participated in American slavery and the moral, political and practical issues under-riding that question.

Keeping Teachers

There may be nothing more important in the educational life of a child than having effective teachers, but U.S. schools are struggling to attract and keep them. The problem is most acute in rural areas, where kids may learn math from a social studies teacher. In urban schools, the teachers most likely to leave are black men, who make up just 2 percent of teachers. This APM Reports documentary tells two separate but connected stories about the teachers these schools desperately need, but can’t hold on to: black men and those willing to work in rural areas. There are surprising similarities in why schools struggle to attract and keep these teachers that are particularly relevant now, when the divides between urban and rural — and white and black — are getting so much attention.

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SUNY Considers Lighter Requirements For Charter School Teachers

The State University of New York board members overseeing charter schools are in the midst of a public comment period on whether charter school teachers should be allowed to have fewer qualifications than public school teachers. Under the controversial proposal, charter schools that already have demonstrated strong academic performance would be able to set their own qualifications, with one proposal requiring a bachelor’s degree and just 30 hours of classroom instruction in order to begin teaching students. Public school teachers are required to eventually obtain a master’s degree and undergo a lengthy certification process that includes exams and a full semester of student teaching. Andy Pallotta, the president of the New York State United Teachers union, said he is “completely against” the proposal. “Why would you have someone who only needs 30 hours of instructional time with students to become a teacher in one circumstance?” said Pallotta, who added traditional public schools appropriately have “tremendous” requirements for teachers.

Shadow Class: College Dreamers in Trump’s America

Public schools in the United States have to treat undocumented students like citizens. But once these students graduate, everything changes. Without papers, they don’t qualify for federal college grants, they can’t legally work to pay for tuition, and they may have to pay out-of-state tuition. Some young immigrants received temporary papers under an Obama administrative program, but now they find themselves on a collision course with newly powerful opponents, including a president who swept into office on a wave of anti-immigrant fear and anger. APM Reports follows immigrant students under the Trump administration.

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PA Lawmakers Advocate For Flexibility In Public School Funding

HARRISBURG (WSKG) – A group of state lawmakers are introducing a bill they say would give students in Pennsylvania’s lowest-performing schools more options for their education.  The plan would create school savings accounts, which would allow parents to take control of the money that would be spent on their kids in the public school system, and enable them to use it for alternative education options. Republican Senator John DiSanto of Dauphin County described the savings accounts as being about giving kids and their parents more agency. “This is not a panacea…there are real nationwide problems that we need to address,” he noted, when asked about fixing entrenched funding inadequacies in Pennsylvania’s public school system. “But this is a small tool in Pennsylvania [where] we can really have an impact.” The accounts would be available to students at the bottom 15 percent of the commonwealth’s schools.  According to the Department of Education’s assessment, almost 400 schools qualify.

Hanford Mills Celebrates Independence Day

The Hanford Mills Museum celebrates Independence Day with demonstrations, a fishing contest, frog-jumping, and ice cream made by a steam-powered churn using ice from last winter’s Ice Harvest.  Executive Director Liz Callahan talks about the many events and hands-on learning opportunities available at the Independence Day Celebration. http://wskg.org/audio/hanford4th.mp3

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NY Ed Commish Reports Progress On New Standards As Exam Boycotts Continue

New York state’s education commissioner said Tuesday that new state-specific learning standards will offer several improvements over the controversial Common Core standards.  Commissioner MaryEllen Elia’s report came on a day when large numbers of students in some parts of the state were expected to once again boycott the required third- through eighth-grade math tests. Elia said the timing was pure coincidence. “This is about standards,” said Elia. “This is not about opt-out.” The education department has been working on developing the new standards since late 2015. Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who initially supported the controversial fast-tracking of Common Core, issued a report in December of that year. It recommended slowing things down and carefully revamping the unpopular Common Core standards.

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PA House Takes Another Crack At Charter Schools

HARRISBURG (WSKG) — The state legislature is returning to one of its toughest recurring issues–charter school reform. Among the provisions laid out in the latest omnibus proposal to get onto the House floor are a standardized application process for schools seeking charters, more consistent school performance rubrics, and an extension of the charter review period from five to ten years. As often happens, public school and charter school advocates are divided on it. Ana Meyers, executive director for the state Coalition for Public Charter Schools, said the proposal needs work. In particular, she opposes a $27 million funding cut for online-only charters.