In A Word featuring Ishion Hutchinson & Carole Boyce Davies, In Conversation

In A Word featuring Ishion Hutchinson & Carole Boyce Davies, In Conversation
Wednesday, May 1, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall

Carole Boyce Davies is a professor of English and Africana Studies at Cornell University. She has held distinguished professorships at a number of institutions, including the Herskovits Professor of African Studies and Professor of Comparative Literary Studies and African American Studies at Northwestern University. She is the author of Black Women, Writing and Identity: Migrations of the Subject and Left of Karl Marx: The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones. Her most recent monograph is Caribbean Spaces: Escape Routes from Twilight Zones and a children’s book, Walking. Ishion Hutchinson was born in Port Antonio, Jamaica.

The Robert Chasen Memorial Poetry Reading by Claudia Rankine

The Robert Chasen Memorial Poetry Reading by Claudia Rankine, Poet & Writer
Thursday, April 18, 5:00 p.m.
Alice Statler Auditorium, Statler Hall

The Spring 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series comes to a close with a reading by poet & writer Claudia Rankine. Recipient of the 2016 MacArthur Fellowship, Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry. Rankine is the recipient of the Poets & Writers’ Jackson Poetry Prize and fellowships from the Lannan Foundation and the National Endowment of the Arts. Rankine’s bestselling book, Citizen: An American Lyric, was the winner of the 2015 Forward Prize for Best Collection, the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry (it was also a finalist in the criticism category, making it the first book in the award’s history to be a double nominee), the NAACP Image Award, the PEN Open Book Award, and the LA Times Book Award for poetry. Citizen also holds the distinction of being the only poetry book to be a New York Times bestseller in the nonfiction category.

The 40th Anniversary of the Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture by Suzanne Akbari: “Chaucer’s Periodization”

The 40th Anniversary of the Paul Gottschalk Memorial Lecture by Suzanne Akbari
“Chaucer’s Periodization”
Thursday, February 28, 4:30 p.m.
Guerlac Room, A.D. White House

To talk about “Chaucer’s periodization” often means to ask how we ourselves think of Chaucer: as a quintessentially “medieval” poet, or as a harbinger of the “modern.” Instead, this lecture explores how Chaucer and his contemporaries saw their own place in time, focusing on the House of Fame, the Knight’s Tale, the Man of Law’s Tale, and Troilus and Criseyde, and asking questions such as the following: Does Chaucer present a linear or a cyclical view of history? To what extent does each national history stand on its own? And what’s the place of the individual subject within Chaucer’s periodization? Suzanne Conklin Akbari is Director of the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto. She has written books on optics and allegory (Seeing Through the Veil) and European views of Islam and the Orient (Idols in the East), and edited collections on travel literature (Marco Polo), Mediterranean Studies (A Sea of Languages), and somatic histories (The Ends of the Body).

The Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading by Robert Morgan & Ernesto Quiñónez

The Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading by Robert Morgan & Ernesto Quiñónez
Thursday, February 7, 4:30 p.m.
Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, G70 Klarman Hall
The Spring 2019 Barbara & David Zalaznick Creative Writing Reading Series kicks off with the Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading featuring Robert Morgan, poet & novelist, and Ernesto Quiñónez, writer. Robert Morgan is the author of fifteen books of poems, most recently Terroir and Dark Energy. He has published eleven works of fiction, including Gap Creek and Chasing the North Star. Nonfiction works include Boone: A Biography and Lions of the West. Recipient of awards from the Guggenheim Foundation and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, he is a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers.

'An Ear for Drama' Seeks Scripts From Student Groups

You might listen to three podcasts a week, some streaming from a favorite website or others downloaded to your phone… But what entertainment could be found through your headphones beforethe internet? Enter the RADIO DRAMA! Wikipedia reminds us that radio drama first appeared in the 1920s and quickly rose in popularity. In the 1940s, it was a leading form of popular entertainment for children and adults; and one they often enjoyed together. The invention of the television stunted this popularity, but radio dramas have continued to be produced over the past 90 years.