American Graduate Day 2017

American Graduate Day returns to WSKG TV on Saturday, October 14, 2017 at 2:00pm. American Graduate Day 2017, supported by CPB, is a live, four-hour multi-platform broadcast that focuses on organizations and individuals keeping kids on the path to graduation. The event explores the importance of mentorship through the critical themes of early education, more and better learning, special needs, STEAM, dropout prevention and re-engagement, career readiness, and college completion. WSKG will also highlight the amazing dedication and work being done by local educators, our very own American Graduate Champions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qegt3PGUKrA

Viewers can participate in the event by asking questions and sharing ideas before and during the broadcast on Twitter and Facebook, using the hashtags #AmGrad and #UpstateGrad.

PRX Education Specials to Air on WSQX Radio

College Choice: the Value of It All (PRX)
Saturday, December 10, 2016 | 10:00am
A long held mantra – that the best investment is a good education – is increasingly being called into question. In that context, NPR’s Robert Siegel set out to learn how nine bright and engaging college students feel now about the choices they made back then. We’ve gathered together the highlights of Robert’s reporting for All Things Considered into a single hour-long narrative, driven by these questions and these students. Stuck at Square One: The Remedial Education Trap (PRX)
Saturday, December 17, 2016 | 10:00am  
When students go to college, they expect to be in college classes. But in fact, 4 in 10 students end up in basic remedial math and English, re-learning what they were supposed to learn in high school.

'American Graduate Day' Returns for 2016

American Graduate Day returns to WSKG TV on Saturday, September 17, 2016 at 2:00pm. American Graduate Day 2016 supported by CPB, is a live, four-hour multiplatform broadcast that focuses on organizations and individuals keeping kids on the path to graduation. The event explores the importance of mentorship through the critical themes of early education, more and better learning, special needs, STEAM, dropout prevention and re-engagement, career readiness, and college completion. WSKG will also highlight the amazing dedication and work being done by local educators, our very own American Graduate Champions. https://youtu.be/PfjWKq6DGpI

 

Viewers can participate in the event by asking questions and sharing ideas before and during the broadcast on Twitter and Facebook, using the hashtags #AmGrad and #UpstateGrad.

'Frontline' Presents Updates to Two Films During 'Spotlight Education' Week

In a one-hour special FRONTLINE presents two films on education in America. First: In “A Subprime Education,” we return to the story of for-profit colleges — which FRONTLINE first examined in the 2010 film “College Inc.” — to investigate allegations of fraud and predatory behavior in the troubled industry, and the collapse of Corinthian Colleges. Then, “The Education of Omarina” updates a story FRONTLINE has been following since 2012 — showing how an innovative program to stem the high school dropout crisis has affected one girl’s journey, from a public middle school in the Bronx to an elite New England private school, and now on to college. This two-part hour airs as part of PBS’s “Spotlight Education,” a week of primetime programming focused on the challenges facing America’s education system.  Watch on WSKG TV Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at 9:00pm.

Film Follows Two Teens Over Course of Five Years in 'All the Difference'

The largely invisible and often crushing struggles of young African-American men come vividly — and heroically — to life in All the Difference, which traces the paths of two teens from the South Side of Chicago who dream of graduating from college. Statistics predict that Robert and Krishaun will drop out of high school, but they have other plans. Oscar®-nominated producer/director Tod Lending’s intimate film, executive produced by author Wes Moore, follows the young men through five years of hard work, sacrifice, setbacks and uncertainty. As they discover, support from family, teachers and mentors makes all the difference in defying the odds. Airs on WSKG TV Monday, September 12, 2016 at 10:00pm as part of the PBS Spotlight Education week of special programming.

Celebrating Graduation with the Class of… 2023?

Graduation season is in full swing across upstate New York. Hundreds of teenagers are taking that walk across the stage to receive their high school diploma. How exciting! But we can’t forget about the younger students who also have exciting milestones to celebrate with the end of a school year. Let’s spend some time talking about their achievements and keeping them motivated to reach graduation! Elizabeth Bigsby, used-to-be fifth grader from Union-Endicott, thanks her dad for supporting her in school and calculates that she will be a member of the Class of 2023!

‘American Graduates’ Honored at Corning High School Learning Center

Congratulations to the Class of 2016! Tomorrow, three more students from WSKG’s American Graduate project will walk up to the podium and receive their high school diploma. Yay! We extend our congratulations to these three and all the student participants in our media production partnership with Corning-Painted Post High School Learning Center. Since the premiere of their thoughtful videos, nine students have officially joined the club we spend so much time reflecting on: They are American Graduates!

Celebrating 'American Graduates' from EverTech Academy

An evening to celebrate the newest American Graduates of our community! On Monday, June 13, 2016, thirty-eight students, their teachers, families, and friends gathered at Broome Tioga BOCES in Binghamton, NY for the graduation ceremony of EverTech Academy.  Ten of these talented young people were featured earlier this year in WSKG’s American Graduate project. They shared stories of courage, persistence, and the supportive circles that helped make graduation day a reality.  

During the ceremony, nine (yes, nine!) of WSKG’s American Graduate students were honored with academic awards or scholarships. Congratulations!

Follow First Generation College Students in 'Why Not Us?'

Follow the journeys of four young people—all first in their families to go to college—as they road-trip across the country to interview inspiring individuals who were also first in their families to pursue higher education. After gaining wisdom and guidance from trail-blazing leaders—including Anna Maria Chávez, CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA, Grammy Award-winner John Legend, and Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz—the Roadtrippers are emboldened to embrace the opportunities ahead and ask “why shouldn’t I succeed?”
Watch on WSKG TV March 26, 2016 at 5:30am.  Check out a preview of the program:

Immigrant Youth Want Stories Told and Policies Changed in 'Papers'

“Papers” is the story of undocumented youth and the challenges they face as they turn 18 without legal status. There are approximately 2 million undocumented children who were born outside the U.S. and raised in this country. These are young people who were educated in American schools, hold American values, know only the U.S. as home and who, upon high school graduation, find the door to their future slammed shut. It is against the law to work or drive. It is difficult, if not impossible in some states, to attend college.

G is for Graduation

It’s never too early to talk about the importance of education. As part of our local American Graduate project, we encourage all learners – even the youngest – to think about who or what champions them on the path to graduation! This simple activity serves as a great starting point to talk about the importance of education!  We made this to use at home, in a daycare setting, or in PreK/Kindergarten.  Ask guiding questions such as: “Going to school is important because…”

Students & Teachers: Deadline approaching!

A friendly reminder that reflections, artwork, or media pieces for Who’s Your Champion? are due soon! Submissions must be received by Wednesday, January 27, 2016 to be featured in WSKG’s American Graduate project. Read this for details and submission form. Quick reminder of what we’re looking for:
Stories and anecdotes from children, teens, and young adults
Creative ways of thanking your champion
Celebrating someone who helps (or helped) you be successful in school
Write a poem about your experience. Instagram a selfie with your champion, commenting how she helps you.

Hey Little Ones… Who's Your Champion?

It’s never too early to talk about the importance of education. As part of our local American Graduate project, we want to encourage all learners – even the youngest – to think about who or what champions them on the path to graduation! This simple activity serves as a great starting point to talk about the importance of education!  We made this to use at home, in a daycare setting, or in PreK/Kindergarten.  Ask guiding questions such as: “Going to school is important because…”

New Data on National Graduation Rates Point to Need for Community-Based Solutions to Dropout Crisis

New data on high school graduation rates released by the U.S. Department of Education underscore the continued need for innovative, community-based solutions highlighted by American Graduate, a local/national public media initiative focused on improving high school graduation rates. The Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics showed that the graduation rate for the nation’s class of 2014 reached a record high 82 percent, an increase of 1 percentage point from the class of 2013’s graduation rate. Graduation rates for several student demographics rose as well from the class of 2013 to the class of 2014, except for American Indian and Alaskan Native students, for whom rates remained virtually flat. But significant gaps remain, particularly between white students and their black and Hispanic counterparts, and economically disadvantaged students. The data follows the passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (or ESSA) on December 10, 2015, the first major national education overhaul since the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act in 2001.

Ted Talks Education

Public television and TED, the non-profit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading, share a deep commitment to addressing the high school dropout crisis. The TED Talks Education one-hour program brings together a diverse group of teachers and education advocates delivering short, high-impact talks on the theme of teaching and learning. These original TED Talks are given by thought leaders including Geoffrey Canada, Bill Gates, Rita F. Pierson, Dr. Angela Lee Duckworth and Sir Ken Robinson. TED Talks Education is part of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting’s American Graduate initiative. See all speakers and performers and check out this powerful excerpt:

Watch the full hour-long program on WSKG TV on December 19th at 5:30am.

WSKG ASKS: Who's Your Champion?

As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we want to hear about the person, place, program, or support that is helping you be successful in school. Introduce us to your champion! (Submit your own stories in the form below.)

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! Recent graduates are also welcome! If you could have held the microphone on graduation day, who is the person you would most like to thank?

Race to Nowhere

Featuring the heartbreaking stories of students across the country who have been pushed to the brink by over-scheduling, over-testing and the relentless pressure to achieve, Race to Nowhere points to a silent epidemic in our schools. Through the testimony of educators, parents and education experts, it reveals an education system in which cheating has become commonplace; students have become disengaged; stress-related illness, depression and burnout are rampant; and young people arrive at college and the workplace unprepared and uninspired. Shown nationwide and internationally in more than 7,000 schools, universities, cinemas, hospitals, corporations and community centers, “Race to Nowhere” has become the centerpiece of a nationwide, grassroots movement for the transformation of education. Watch on WSKG TV November 28th at 5:30am. https://youtu.be/Uem73imvn9Y

 

More often than it should, the job interfered with my school work

Path To Graduation: Putting Out Fires
Written & Produced By:
Nicole Keili, Graduate, Class of October 2015; and
Lennon Kruckow, Graduate, Class of June 2015 (and current Corning Community College student!)

In Partnership With:
High School Learning Center at Corning Community College; and
Corning-Painted Post Area School District

 

http://wskgyouthvoice.tumblr.com/post/133930529308/alternative-schools-are-a-second-option-for

“One morning in high school, I got called to fight a fire at 4:00AM. The call lasted into the late morning, causing me to be late to school by a few hours,” explains Lennon. “I was spending a lot of time working at the fire department while I was in high school. More often than it should, the job interfered with my school work,” says Lennon. “Between calls early in the morning or late at night, it would effect my sleep sometimes.

How confidence affects your abilities in school

Path To Graduation: Complexity of Confidence
Written and Produced By:
Mika Evans, Grade 12; and
Cody Scott, Grade 12

In Partnership With:
High School Learning Center at Corning Community College; and
Corning- Painted Post Area School District

 

http://wskgyouthvoice.tumblr.com/post/133880817610/when-an-alternative-school-is-an-available-option

 

It’s hard to think about how much someone’s confidence can affect their abilities in school. But your confidence affects everything: Answering questions in class, asking for help on an assignment, and even forming friendships. “In the traditional high school, I was bullied, rumors were spread and, because of that, I had no self confidence,” shares Mika. “I didn’t care about going to school or getting my school work done. But after attending an alternative school, my confidence blossomed.

Culture of support & trust that focuses on learning

Path To Graduation: Alternative Success
Written and Produced By:
Christian Ackerman, Grade 12, and
Brooke White, Grade 11

In Partnership With:
High School Learning Center at Corning Community College; and
Corning- Painted Post Area School District

 

http://wskgyouthvoice.tumblr.com/post/133799170777/compassionate-teachers-change-students-lives

 

According to the 2015 Building A Grad Nation Report, 81% of students in the United States are graduating. However, this leaves the remaining 19% of high school students who don’t graduate. What happens to them? For some students in Corning, New York, there is such a thing as a second chance. The High School Learning Center is just that: a second chance to be successful in high school.

An entirely different atmosphere, different methods of learning

Path To Graduation: Journey To Success
Written and Produced By:
Corey Hoover, Grade 12, Class of 2016; and
Joey Usma, Graduate, Class of October 2015

In Partnership With:
High School Learning Center at Corning Community College; and
Corning- Painted Post Area School District

 

http://wskgyouthvoice.tumblr.com/post/133482945356/alternative-high-schools-are-a-place-where-you-can

The national high school graduation rate is 81% according to the 2015 Building a Grad Nation Report. In New York State, the average graduation rate is lower at 77%. One way to increase the number of students who successfully reach graduation is through alternative high schools. Alternative high schools are an educational option that allow students to work in an entirely different atmosphere, with different methods of learning. “The regular high school is different because the teachers there, they just want the students to pass, they want them to get A’s on their tests,” explains Joey.

After the incident, I had a hard time focusing at school

Path To Graduation: Harassment in High School
Written and Produced By:
Faith Sutton, Grade 11, Class of 2016; and
Ryan VanAmburg, Graduate, Class of October 2015

In Partnership With:
High School Learning Center at Corning Community College; and
Corning- Painted Post Area School District

 

http://wskgyouthvoice.tumblr.com/post/133420401347/faith-experienced-harassment-in-high-school-and

 

Sexual harassment at school is more common than most people realize. Nearly half of high schoolers in a 2011 study experienced it in a single year. And female students are much more likely to be the victims of harassment. In a school setting with large classes, it’s easy for this kind of thing to go unnoticed. “With the larger schools, I think a lot of things are under the radar and most people can’t really catch onto it,” explains Faith. “Unless it’s too late or there’s a lot of people involved, rather than just one person.

Supporting students on the autism spectrum to reach graduation

Path To Graduation: Teaching Students on the Autism Spectrum
Written and Produced By:
Jordan Phillippe, Grade 10, Oneonta High School

 

http://wskgyouthvoice.tumblr.com/post/133346256823/weve-conferred-with-everyone-who-has-had-some

Students on the autism spectrum face challenges in school. They often learn differently than others. Joseph Yelich is superintendent of the Oneonta City School District in Upstate New York. Mr. Yelich describes how he makes sure, as a superintendent, students on the autism spectrum in public schools get the education they need. “We have a strong evaluation program and very well trained professionals inside of classrooms and out,” says Yelich.

My parents opted me out

Path To Graduation: Testing
Written & Produced By Nathan Schwed, Grade 8, Oneonta Middle School

http://wskgyouthvoice.tumblr.com/post/132019743442/we-hear-a-lot-about-common-core-testing-in

With 22% of students in New York State not finishing high school in 2014, is now a good time to start testing against new standards? I asked two community leaders their thoughts on Common Core standards. Senator James Seward represents the Oneonta-area in the New York State Senate. I asked Senator Seward his opinion. “Well, I have some grave concerns about the Common Core, in particular, the way it has been rolled out here in New York State,” says Seward.

I know mentoring works

Path To Graduation: Mentors
Written & Produced By Kieran Jennings, Grade 8, Schenevus Central School District

http://wskgyouthvoice.tumblr.com/post/131946303474/i-know-mentoring-works-because-i-have-mentors

Did you know? Researchers at the World Bank identified mentoring as one of the most promising approaches to serve at-risk children around the world. I know mentoring works because I have mentors myself, like teachers and aides, who help me stay organized, make good choices, and work hard even if I don’t feel like it. “One of the really important things that good teachers understand is that their relationship with a student is what’s going to make the difference for that student in terms of success,” says Thomas Jennings, superintendent of the Schenevus Central School District in Upstate New York. Mr. Jennings thinks that all students could benefit from positive time with adults in school.

Literacy is the key to success

Path To Graduation: Literacy
Written & Produced By Caroline Carter, Grade 10, Oneonta High School

http://wskgyouthvoice.tumblr.com/post/131815236605/could-you-pass-a-test-on-rock-formations-if-you

You might not think about it, but you use literacy skills all day long. When you are checking your texts, reading your emails, reading road signs, filling out forms, reading food labels, and taking tests… To do all of those things, you use literacy skills. But did you know, that according to a 2014 survey, 1 in 7 adults in the United States cannot read? “Literacy really is the foundation for educational success,” explains principal Thomas Brindley. “I believe it’s the foundation for success in life in general.” Mr. Brindley is principal of Oneonta High School.

American Graduate Champion | Joe Renton

Joe Renton is recognized as a local American Graduate Champion! For nearly twenty years he and wife Barbara have provided informal music lessons to students in upstate New York. Mr. Renton volunteered with local high school bands on a daily basis providing instruction and mentorship to hundreds of students. Additionally, the Rentons sponsored music lessons and trips to the Binghamton Philharmonic for students to help cultivate a culture of music in the community. “Many activities come and go over time, but your knowledge of music is a lifelong gift that will open many doors for you.

American Graduate Day | LIVE

Tune in to PBS on Saturday, October 3rd from 11:00am-6pm ET for the fourth annual American Graduate Day, broadcast live from Tisch WNET Studios at Lincoln Center.  Watch the program live online or on WSKG TV (which will feature local highlights!). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUuo9LiRLjM
American Graduate Day is a full-day multi-platform event live featuring local and national programming, community partners, and celebrities, to celebrate the exceptional work of the individuals and groups whose ongoing efforts and daily heroics help youth stay on track to earn high school diplomas. @Amerigrad | #AmGrad | @WSKG | #UpstateGrad

American Graduate Champions | Dropout Prevention Educators

Everyday, classroom teachers have the opportunity to support and motive students to do their best and stay in school. Some local teachers are simply stellar at this. We call them caring, consistent adults and they are our local American Graduate Champions! https://youtu.be/x_5aMe1A3Os

Who’s the champion in your life? Follow the American Graduate movement!

American Graduate Day | Dolly Parton

Dolly Parton, country music legend and founder of Imagination Library, is an American Graduate Champion!  Catch stories of education inspiration this Saturday, October 3rd on WSKG TV during American Graduate Day 2015.  This multi-broadcast event takes place from 11am-6pm.  You can also follow online using hashtags #AmGrad and #UpstateGrad. https://youtu.be/PMtyXKnk00I
 

American Graduate Week | WORLD Channel

From September 27th to October 2nd, WORLD Channel presents a week of documentaries that focus on the continuing challenges facing students, parents, teachers and administrators ‘outside’ of the 90%. Anchoring American Graduate on WORLD is an all-new Local, USA (Stories from the Classroom), If You Build It from WORLD’s original docu-series America ReFramed, and additional series Central Standard and Dropping Back In as well as eight other provocative programs.  
Here’s the local lineup which you can watch on WSKG’s World Channel/46.2:
M 9/28 | Local, USA | 6pm and 9pm
M 9/28 | The Graduates/Los Graduados | 7pm and 8pm

T 9/29 | The Graduate/Los Graduados | 2pm and 3pm
T 9/29 | Local, USA | 4pm
T 9/29 | Go Public: A Day in the Life of An American School District | 6:30pm

W 9/30 | Go Public: A Day in the Life of An American School District | 3:30pm
W 9/30 | Central Standard: On Education | 6:00pm and 6:30pm
W 9/30 | 180 Days: Hartsville | 8pm
W 9/30 | Schools That Change Communities | 9pm

Th 10/1 | 180 Days: Hartsville | 2pm and 3pm
Th 10/1 | Schools That Change Communities | 4pm
Th 10/1 | Central Standard: On Education | 6pm
Th 10/1 | 180 Days: A Year Inside An American High School | 7pm
Th 10/1 | Our Time is Now | 9pm

Fr 10/2 | Local, USA | 11am
F 10/2 | 180 Days: A Year Inside An American High School | 2pm
F 10/2 | Our Time is Now | 4pm
F 10/2 | Central Standard: On Education | 6pm
F 10/2 | Dropping Back In: Second Chances | 6:30pm
F 10/2 | 180 Days: A Year Inside An American High School | 7pm
F 10/2 | Facing Forward: A Student’s Story | 9pm

Inspired by the American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen initiative and supported by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB).   
 

Teaching Teachers

WSQX Radio | Sunday, August 30, 2015 at 10:00am

WSKG Radio | Monday, August 31, 2015 at 8:00pm

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they’re on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

The Living Legacy: Black Colleges in the 21st Century

WSQX Radio | Sunday, August 23, 2015 at 10:00am

WSKG Radio | Monday, August 24, 2015 at 8:00pm

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial — and unique — role.

Join in #UpstateGrad

Join in the conversation! What are you reading about in education? What’s important to you? We want to hear from you! Tell us on Twitter and Facebook with #UpstateGrad, and see what we’re learning from you and our community below.

Binghamton High School | American Graduate

During fall/winter 2014, Binghamton High School Grade 10 students explored the dropout crisis in the United States.  They learned about graduation rates in their own school. These audio reports are the students’ reflections on topics such as who or what motives them to come to school, how graduation is perceived in their school, or why they feel a high school diploma will help their future.  
YOUTH VOICE: AMERICAN GRADUATE EDITION
Listen to the students below!  

“Coming to school every day is the first step in going to college.

Celebrate Education Champions with American Graduate

An American Graduate Champion commits their time, skills, and resources to make sure that young people succeed in school. These individuals, groups, or organizations play an active role in improving educational outcomes for students. WSKG celebrates the champions in our community! The champions featured below were nominated by community members or honored by students from EverTech Academy at Broome Tioga BOCES.  

 

 
Watch

 
Listen

 

Community Engagement Initiative | 2011

Dropout crisis: Join the conversation in your community
Every nine seconds in America a student becomes a dropout. The lifelong impact of dropping out of school is tremendous: dropouts are more likely to rely on public assistance, have poorer health, or become incarcerated than their counterparts who finish high school.  
WSKG RADIO
What does the dropout crisis look like in our region? What impact does dropping out of school have on individuals and the community as a whole? Examine these issues in stories and interviews produced by WSKG Radio and the Innovation Trail.

Binghamton High School | December 2012

Students host community event to encourage classmates to graduate
Are YOU in? Binghamton students challenged their peers to get focused on graduating. Students organized a community resource fair to help classmates and their parents get to know the supports available to them, both in the school and around the community. Students and families met with representatives from the Guidance Department, Upward Bound, The Haven, US Military, College Connections, The Urban League, Sister to Sister, and more. Culinary Arts students cooked and served delicious food (for free!) and Student Government Officers moderated a Q&A panel featuring formerly at-risk students who overcame struggles and challenges to achieve graduation.

Evertech Alternative High School | March 2013

Nobody’s motivating me to graduate, nobody but me, at least. Sure, people try to pep talk me, but none of it works on me. While most of the people around me have something motivating them to succeed, I’m working on my own accord. -Donald, Grade 11In the United States, 1 in 5 students will drop out before he or she finishes high school. How does this statistic affect students in our community?

Boys & Girls Clubs / GIAC | May 2013

Teens share powerful words on achieving graduation
What does a high school diploma mean to you? Middle and high school students captured their personal reflects to this important question by writing scripts, recording audio, and editing together a final piece to share on WSKG Radio! During after school programming at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Binghamton and Greater Ithaca Activities Center (GIAC), students learned voice techniques for best recording and used field recording equipment and editing software as part of WSKG’s youth media program. Students and their families came together at WSKG Studios for a first-listen of the radio pieces and in celebration of their accomplishments! They did a fantastic job!

Binghamton High School | January 2015

Students explore how graduation is perceived at BHS
Do you know how many students drop out of high school every year? Tenth grade students in Emily Buss’ English class explored dropout rates across the United States and learned about graduation rates in their own school. Many were shocked to learn that 3 out of every 10 students would not make it far enough to walk across the stage on graduation day! Students created audio pieces featuring their personal reflections on topics such as who or what motives them to come to school, how graduation is perceived in their school, or why they feel a high school diploma will help their future. As participants in WSKG’s youth media program, each student wrote an audio script, learned voice techniques for best recording, explored photography and graphic design, and experienced the powerful reach of sharing your voice on social media.

What is American Graduate?

The WSKG American Graduate Project, funded by a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, is an initiative to raise awareness about the dropout crisis in our community by engaging a wide range of stakeholders in a dialogue and by mobilizing the community through a multimedia campaign to share resources, best practices, and stories of challenge and success. When students are asked if they will graduate from high school, about nine in 10 will answer ‘yes.’ However, statistics show about only seven in 10 students actually finish high school, and that statistic drops further for minority students and English Language Learners. Students have the will to graduate, but they do not always have the necessary support or resources. How can I talk about dropout issues in my classroom?