Big Pacific | Voracious

Big Pacific airs on WSKG TV Wednesday July 5, 2017 at 8pm

During this episode of Big Pacific explore how animals survive, thrive or become someone else’s meal.  There is plenty of food in the Pacific Ocean, but it is the challenge of finding that food that drives all life in the Pacific. In the voracious Pacific we meet a destructive army of mouths, a killer with a hundred mouths and the biggest mouth in the ocean.The Pacific Ocean covers one third of the Earth’s surface. It is larger than all Earth’s land combined, holds half of our world’s water, and hides the deepest place on our planet. It is a place where huge and iconic, rare and dazzling creatures live – and where creatures yet to be discovered lurk.

Great Yellowstone Thaw

View at a vivid grand canyon of the Yellowstone and Yellowstone River. Credit: Filip Fuxa/Shutterstock

 

Great Yellowstone Thaw airs on WSKG-TV on Wednesday June 28, 2017 at 9pm

Greater Yellowstone is a unique place. Nestling high up in the Rocky Mountains in North West America, this ecosystem is one of the world’s greatest wildernesses. But it’s a place of extremes, and the wildlife must deal with one of the toughest springs on Earth. To understand how, this series is following a number of iconic wildlife families – including wolves, grizzlies, Great Gray Owls and beavers.

The Story of Cats | Asia to Africa

The Story of Cats: Asia to Africa airs on WSKG-TV Wednesday March 15, 2017 at 9:30pm

 

Cats are among the most feared and revered creatures on the planet.  Their power, strength, and enigmatic nature have fascinated us for centuries.  They’ve dominated human culture since the dawn of civilization.  Go from the rainforests, to the savannah, to the mountain peaks all the way into the comfort of our homes.  Get an in-depth look at this unique species and the evolutionary tricks and adaptations that truly make a cat, a cat. n the first episode of The Story of Cats, we discover how the first cats arose in the forests of Asia, how they spread across the continent, and later came to conquer Africa.  We reveal how they evolved flexible limbs to climb, giant bodies to survive in the cold, and super senses to catch prey.  Ultimately we discover how becoming social made the lion, king of the savannah.  Also featured in this episode are other larger cats such as the clouded, snow and African leopards, the Bengal and Siberian tigers, and the cheetah.  However, the introductions of smaller and lesser-known species like the serval, the caracal, and the fishing, Pallas’s and sand cats are just as fascinating.

Wild Ways

NOVA Wild Ways airs on WSKG TV  April 20, 2016 at 9pm. Four-lane highways may be a necessity to our modern society, but they can be a death traps for millions of animals that try to cross them. Around the world, wildlife need to roam for breeding, foraging, and to carry out their traditional migrations–but they are often blocked by ranches, farms, roads, and other human-made obstacles. While national parks and preserves offer some protection to wildlife, even the magnificent Serengeti and Yellowstone parks are too small to sustain healthy populations over generations. But now comes new hope for wildlife through an approach called “connectivity conservation.” Some of the world’s most beloved species–lions, bears, antelope and elephants–can be preserved by linking the world’s wildlife refuges with tunnels, overpasses, and protected land corridors.

The Private Life of Deer

Nature The Private Life of Deer airs on WSKG TV on March 16, 2016 at 8pm.  

Whitetailed deer seem to be always around us, whether they’re grazing alongside our roadways, feasting on plants in our backyards or darting into the woods, though these “neighbors” do like to protect their privacy. While other species may be negatively impacted by human development, it is just the opposite for the whitetails. “We as humans have created pretty much the perfect habitat for deer,” explains Dr. Jay Boulanger, who coordinates Cornell University’s Deer Research and Management Program. “These are areas that have a wide diversity of plants that deer can eat, versus, say, a rural forest.”

Animal Homes

Animals, like humans, need a place they can call home to provide a safe and stable place to raise a family, but they go about building it in entirely different ways. Whether it is a bird’s nest, bear den, beaver lodge or spider web, these are homes of great complexity, constructed from a wide range of natural as well as man-made materials. This three-part series investigates just how animals build their remarkable homes around the globe and the intriguing behaviors and social interactions that take place in and around them. Hosting the series is ecologist Chris Morgan (Siberian Tiger Quest, Bears of the Last Frontier), who serves as guide and real estate agent. He evaluates and deconstructs animal abodes, their materials, location, neighborhood and aesthetics.