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NY Cities Struggle Against Child Poverty

Child poverty rates in four upstate New York cities are more than double state averages. The issue spurred an anti-poverty campaign in Rochester earlier this year, and now Binghamton is getting on board, too. Johnson City School District Superintendent Mary Kay Frys spoke at a public meeting two state legislators held in Binghamton this week. She says there’s a poverty crisis in the district. “We have had elementary students dumpster dive in restaurant receptacles in the village in order to get food that has been thrown out,” she says.

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Lupardo, Hevesi Convene Child Poverty Roundtable

 

Almost a quarter of New York children live in poverty, and in the city of Binghamton, that figure is near 50 percent. State legislators and community leaders gathered in Binghamton today to discuss the problem. Assembly members Donna Lupardo and Andrew Hevesi said some current laws hinder services for low-income people. Joe Sellepack of the Broome County Council of Churches says one of those laws affects people who recently left prison. Inmates can’t apply for social services. So when they’re released, there’s often a gap before they start getting help.