An Exploration Of Contemporary Aboriginal Art At Cornell

No Boundaries: Aboriginal Australian Contemporary Abstract Painting is an exhibit showcasing the work of nine Aboriginal artists from the remote northwest region of Australia. The paintings incorporate sacred and ceremonial objects, traditional symbols and themes with a modern interpretation. The exhibit opened this week at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum at Cornell. Andy Weislogel is a curator at the Johnson Museum and he joined Crystal Sarakas to talk about the exhibition. The nine artists whose work is part of the exhibition are Paddy Bedford, Janangoo Butcher Cherel, Tommy Mitchell, Ngarra, Boxer Milner Tjampitjin, Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri, Tjumpo Tjapanangka, Billy Joongoorra Thomas, and Prince of Wales (Midpul). The exhibition is on display through August 14 at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca.

Revealed: WPA Murals on display at the Johnson Museum

In 1935, the Federal Art Project was established. It was part of President Roosevelt’s Work Progress Administration, and employed thousands of artists over the next decade to create art for public spaces in federal buildings. Four murals – by Ilya Bolotowsky, Albert Swinden, Joseph Rugolo, and Dane Chanase – were commissioned for the Hospital of Chronic Diseases on Welfare Island (later named Goldwater Memorial Hospital, Roosevelt Island). Goldwater Hospital was set to be demolished, to make way for a new building. But first, three of the murals were removed.

Surrealism and Magic at Johnson Museum

n 2014, The Johnson Museum and Cornell Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collectionsexamined the work of Swiss-Amercian surrealist artist Kurt Seligmann. Kurt Seligmann’s work is characterized by possesing imageries of medieval people engaged in macabre and santanical rituals.  He was also an enthusiast and practitioner of magic himself, and was known for organizing ritualistics gatherings in his home in Paris, also frecuented by other famous artists of the era. The exhibition called “Surrelism and Magic” explored his passion and the passion that other surrealists shared for the occult; with over 125 objects in display the exhibition inluded photographs, video art, letters and ephemera, as well as rare books. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXLbiX74ZSY
WSKG’s summer intern Lory Martinez interviews curator Andrew Wieslogel who explains the genesis of this fantastic exhibit.