‘Native America’ TV Series & Event Coming This Fall

Explore the world created by America’s First Peoples. The four part series reaches back 15,000 years to reveal massive cities aligned to the stars, unique systems of science and spirituality, and 100 million people connected by social networks spanning two continents. https://youtu.be/DJy9STLb9IU

EPISODES
From Caves to Cosmos
Combine ancient wisdom and modern science to answer a 15,000-year-old question: who were America’s First Peoples? Nature to Nations
Explore the rise of great American nations, from monarchies to democracies. Cities of the Sky
Discover the cosmological secrets behind America’s ancient cities.

Charles Yaple's "Jacob's Land" Explores the Settling of New York's Frontier

Recently, author and SUNY Cortland professor Dr. Charles Yaple spoke with WSKG’s Shane Johnson about his new nonfiction book, Jacob’s Land: Revolutionary War Soldiers, Schemers, Scoundrels and the Settling of New York’s Frontier (2017). The book chronicles life on New York’s frontier before, during, and after the American Revolution. It does this by weaving together the stories of three individuals; Native American leader Joseph Brant, George Washington’s Surveyor General Simeon DeWitt, and Dr. Yaple’s own ancestor Jacob Yaple. Dr. Yaple is Professor Emeritus of Recreation, Parks and Leisure Studies at SUNY Cortland, and Director of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors. His first book, Foxey Brown: A story of an Adirondack Outlaw, Hermit and Guide as He Might Have Told It, was published in 2011.

Charles Yaple’s “Jacob’s Land” Explores the Settling of New York’s Frontier

Recently, author and SUNY Cortland professor Dr. Charles Yaple spoke with WSKG’s Shane Johnson about his new nonfiction book, Jacob’s Land: Revolutionary War Soldiers, Schemers, Scoundrels and the Settling of New York’s Frontier (2017). The book chronicles life on New York’s frontier before, during, and after the American Revolution. It does this by weaving together the stories of three individuals; Native American leader Joseph Brant, George Washington’s Surveyor General Simeon DeWitt, and Dr. Yaple’s own ancestor Jacob Yaple. Dr. Yaple is Professor Emeritus of Recreation, Parks and Leisure Studies at SUNY Cortland, and Director of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors. His first book, Foxey Brown: A story of an Adirondack Outlaw, Hermit and Guide as He Might Have Told It, was published in 2011.

Queen Catharine Montour

In 1779, the American Revolution came to the frontier regions of New York when a Continental expedition led by Major General John Sullivan left a path of destruction in its wake destroying dozens of Native American villages forcing thousands of their inhabitants to flee north to Canada. Among the villages destroyed during the expedition was She-que-ga, often referred to by travelers as Catharine’s Town. The village, located on the southern bank of Seneca Lake, got the nickname from its leader, Queen Catharine Montour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Sb9BIILDtw

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
Schuyler County Historical Society

Photos Courtesy of:
Schuyler County Historical Society
Library of Congress

Evergreen Cemetery

Established in 1851, Evergreen Cemetery in Owego covers 51 acres of a beautifully landscaped, terraced hillside.  Two stone pillars and a large iron gate mark the entrance, while small streams and stone fences meander across grounds. A wide variety of stone markers and monuments mark the sites were those who worked and lived in Tioga County over the last two centuries as buried. There are also unique sections devoted to veterans of the Civil War and firefighters. One of the most visited gravesites in the cemetery is that of a young Indian maidenknown as Sa-Sa-Na Loft, who died in a tragic train accident after visiting Owego in 1852.  This gravesite is also the epicenter of a number of eerie tales.  

 
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In this web exclusive clip, Professor Tucker explains the tradition of leaving tokens and coins at Sa-Sa-Na Loft’s grave.

Preserving a Piece of Revolutionary War History in New York

During the summer of 1779, a military expedition ravaged the landscape of upstate New York. Today, on the 235th anniversary of the Sullivan-Clinton Campaign, the Public Archeology Facility (PAF) at Binghamton University has received a grant to help preserve a part of this often overlooked aspect of the American Revolution. The Sullivan-Clinton Campaign

In May of 1779, General George Washington ordered Major General John Sullivan and Brigadier General James Clinton to lead a military expedition into the western frontier of New York and Pennsylvania. The expedition was the Continental response to a series of deadly raids conducted from the region by Loyalists  and their Iroquois allies – most notably at Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania and Cherry Valley in New York. The battles of Chemung and Newtown were the only major military engagements of the Sullivan-Clinton Campaign.