A Teen Discussion on Permaculture & Sustainable Agriculture

This audio piece was written and recorded by students in Mrs. Gimma’s production class at New Roots Charter School in Ithaca, NY. Youth Voice students explore environmental science topics of personal interest while learning production skills from WSKG’s youth media curriculum. 
Permaculture and Sustainable Agriculture:  Two growing agricultural businesses in America
Large farming requires high maintenance and very often the need for chemicals and pesticides to keep up with the high yielding needs. This is proven to be very unhealthy for consumers. More recently in Central New York and other parts of the world, farmers find that small farm operations, such as permaculture or sustainable agriculture, is worth the extra cost. It creates healthier crops and supports smaller business instead of large mono-cropping corporations.

A Teen Discussion on Landfill Use

This audio piece was written and recorded by students in Mrs. Gimma’s production class at New Roots Charter School in Ithaca, NY. Youth Voice students explore  environmental science topics of personal interest while learning production skills from WSKG’s youth media curriculum. Managing solid waste has become an overwhelming task. It has brought tremendous disagreements on how to best dispose of waste safely, efficiently and economically.  The controversies range from the rising costs of disposal, to environmental degradation, to new landfills and incinerators that are needed.

A Teen Discussion on Hydrofracking

 This audio piece was written and recorded by Irene Case, Grade 12 student at New Roots Charter School in Ithaca, NY. Youth Voice students explore  environmental science topics of personal interest while learning production skills from WSKG’s youth media curriculum. 

Some people see hydrofracking as an economic benefit. Others have many environmental concerns about the process. Hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as “fracking,” is a process where water, sand, and chemicals are pumped at high pressure thousands of feet underground to crack the rock and release the natural gas.  Fracking fluid is about 98 percent sand and water, but the remaining 2 percent of it contains potentially hazardous chemicals.