‘Portraits and Dreams’ Photography Challenge

Building on themes from the POV documentary Portraits and Dreams, community members told their story – or that of our region ~ through photography. Original photography was submitted to WSKG in the following themed categories of ‘Portraits’, ‘Dreams’, or ‘Community’. Here’s a look at submissions depicting life in rural/suburban New York and Pennsylvania. Thank you to all participants. Community Member Photography
BEST OVERALL
Home 1 | Genevieve Pedulla

COMMUNITY
Top Honor | Jonathan’s Tricks | Darlene Gold
Honorable Mention | Millie 4CLS | Jaclyn Praskavich 

DREAMS
Top Honor | Working Toward the Dream | C. Bangel
Honorable Mention | March Sadness | C. Bangel

PORTRAIT
Top Honor | Snow Portrait | Gregory Milunich
Honorable Mention | Hercules | Jane Walker 

Student Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 
Gabrielle Backman, Chenango Forks High School

“I chose this image because just the overall aura drew me to it.

Photographer and Activist LaToya Ruby Frazier Speaks in Corning

The Rockwell Museum welcomes TED Fellow LaToya Ruby Frazier, who will deliver a talk, ‘Art and Empathy: Storytelling for Social Change’. “For LaToya Ruby Frazier, art is a weapon – a catalyst for social justice. Her photographs and videos document today’s America, including her native Braddock, Pennsylvania. Her work amplifies the stories of post-industrial communities– cities and small towns riven by poverty, racism, healthcare inequality, and environmental toxicity. Bridging the personal with the social, her powerful gorgeous work amplifies the voices of the vulnerable and transforms our sense of place and self.”

The Annual Artists Open House is Back

Artists of Susquehanna County, PA open their studios for the annual Artists Open House on October 7, 8, and 9 from 10am to 6pm. Twenty-six artists in 19 locations display paintings, sculpture, pottery, photography, and woodworking. There is also a treasure hunt and a Richard Gere film festival. We meet painter Earl Lehman and photographer Eric Van Tassel. http://wskg.org/audio/17artstour.mp3

 

Photo credit: Joe Weldon

 

 

'Forces of Nature' are on Display at the Cooperative Gallery 213

The Cooperative Gallery 213 presents ‘Forces of Nature’, an exhibit of oil paintings by Glenda Blake and photographs by Chuck Haupt for the month of April. As the title suggests, the subject is nature with paintings that suggest Impressionism paired with black and white photographs. http://wskg.org/audio/hauptblake.mp3

 

Photo credit: Cooperative Gallery 213

'Around Binghamton' Charts Local History Through Photographs

‘Around Binghamton’ is a new book to be released on Monday, February 13.  Jim Maggiore has grouped his own photographs with photographs of historical interest. “The Greater Binghamton area’s undulating history mirrors that of its terrain. The area has evolved from a transportation center to a hub of manufacturing and technology and, with the expansion of Binghamton University and SUNY Broome Community College, a growing center of erudition. First, canal boats and trains dominated the landscape, then, cigars were produced in abundance, followed by shoes, simulators, and computers. Now, with Binghamton University expanding into downtown, student housing, breweries, and eateries fill Binghamton’s streets.

Small Town Life | Chords of Memory

In our second installment of  Chords of Memory, we highlight photos that illustrate small town life in the early 19th century while Robert Perez plays his song “Summer” on guitar. Photographs courtesy of the Delaware County Historical Association. https://youtu.be/E8RfuLNEeCc

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives. Each piece is intimate and performed acoustically, and many of the photographs shown are preserved at historical societies across our region.

Chords of Memory | Coming Soon

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives. Each piece is intimate and performed acoustically, and many of the photographs shown are preserved at historical societies across our region. Look for more videos coming soon! https://youtu.be/aPz-gv-lfjo

Lewis W. Hine

At the turn of the 20th century, the use of child labor was reaching epidemic proportions in the Untied States. Children often endured horrible working conditions that were hidden form the public view. Lewis W. Hine, a sociologist and photographer, used his camera as an instrument of social change often risking his own life to expose these conditions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfzPlfXWRQs

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
Delaware County Historical Association

Photos Courtesy of:
Delaware County Historical Association
Publicdomainarchive.com

An Award-winning Photographer Displays his Work in Binghamton

The Orazio Salati Studio and Gallery is presenting the work of award-winning photographer Joel Nsadha for two months beginning on July 1. Joel Nsadha won Best Photograph from National Geographic for the photograph you see above.  He tells about winning that prize and his career as a photographer. http://wskg.org/audio/nsadhamix.mp3

 

Photo credit: Joel Nsadha

Margaretville, New York | #tbt

Today’s throwback Thursday photograph captures Main Street in Margaretville, New York, on June 5, 1947. The village of Margaretville is located in Delaware County and is situated inside the town of Middletown and on the border of Catskill Park. Today’s photo was taken by Bob Wyer, a reporter turned professional photographer from Delaware County. Over a career that spanned nearly 40 years, Boy Wyer and his wife Billie helped document the history of Delaware County. Wyer’s extensive collection of over 150,000 negatives is preserved by the Delaware County Historical Association in Delhi, NY.

Tornado Aftermath, 1905 | #tbt

On the evening of June 5th, 1905, the residents of Binghamton, New York, were violently awoken by the thunderous sounds of a tornado that ripped through the city’s Southside. Fortunately, while the storm did serious damage to some homes and barns, no one was killed. For throwback Thursday, we’ve put together a slideshow of photographs taken the day after the storm. The photos highlight some of the destruction caused across Binghamton.  

Photographs Courtesy of the Broome County Historical Society.

Bob Wyer

The field of photojournalism experienced a revolution in the 1920s thanks to the invention of the 35mm camera. Cameramen, no longer waited down by bulky equipment, were free to capture more candid moments. Bob Wyer of Delaware County, New York epitomized this new movement. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzDhTrZeG1s

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
Delaware County Historical Association

Photos Courtesy of:
Delaware County Historical Association

The Early Works Of Ansel Adams Are Highlighted In Cooperstown

Ansel Adams’ black and white photographs captured the American West with a level of sharpness and detail that seems far advanced for his time. Now, a collection of his early works will be shown at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown. Michelle Murdock, Director of Exhibitions at the Fenimore Art Museum, spoke with Crystal Sarakas about Ansel Adams and his legacy. Ansel Adams: Early Works opens April 1 at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown. It will be on display until September 18.

Ireland and the Finger Lakes Compete for a Photographer's Attention

Photographer John Francis McCarthy is displaying his photographs of Ireland and the Finger Lakes through April in the Orazio Salati Studio and Gallery on State Street in downtown Binghamton.  He talks about his annual trips to Ireland, and the circumstances that led to his taking his well-known picture of sunset over the Finger Lakes. http://wskg.org/audio/mccarthymix.mp3

 

Photo credit: John Francis McCarthy, FingerLakes Photography

Tompkins County Farmer during the Great Depression | #tbt

Jack Delano took today’s throwback Thursday photograph in September 1940. It shows a farmer cutting a field of buckwheat along Route 79, near Ithaca, New York. This photo is just one of 170,000 photographs that were taken by the Farm Security Administration during the Great Depression. Between 1935 and 1945, the Farm Security Administrations and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) sent photographers across the country to document the effects of the depression and to help build support for New Deal relief programs. Photographers included Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, and Arthur Rothstein. The program also produced some of the most iconic images of the era.

The National Geographic photography award goes to a local photographer

It was a complete surprise to photographer Joel Nsadha that his picture of a young man with his bicycle was in the running for an award.  It was an even bigger surprise when he won. He tells the story of taking the picture in Uganda, and the hair-raising tale of the search for the original photograph.  Joel Nsadha will be giving a talk on Thursday, January 21 in the Cooperative Gallery 213 in Binghamton.  

 

Photo courtesy Joel Nsadha

The Toll of Office

Since President Obama’s State of the Union address last week, I’ve seen a number of images floating around the web and on social media highlighting how the job of president has aged him over the last eight years. It’s not the first time that the media and the public have noticed this phenomena. The role of Commander-in-chief also took its toll on President George W. Bush and President Bill Clinton. Not to make it a competition, but whenever I see these types of comparisons my mind automatically turns to President Abraham Lincoln. The photo on the left was taken in June of 1860, when Lincoln was a candidate for president.

New Exhibit at Binghamton University Highlights True Costs of the Civil War

The lower gallery of the Binghamton University Art Museum is abuzz with activity. A group of graduate students huddle around a tape measure debating the best way to hang a large picture frame on the wall. Around them on the floor, other frames and labels lay in neat rows. The students are setting up for a new exhibition, entitled The Civil War: Images of Ruin. “This is actually the first exhibition I’ve worked on,” explains Kasia Kieca, an art history student at Binghamton University.

Drummer, Rocker and Photographer Mike Ricciardi

Local artist Mike Ricciardi has been drumming since the age of nine. This rocker turned photographer knows his way around Photoshop, as well as a drum kit. Lately, while touring with musician Marc Berger, his passion for photography art took a turn of no return. He has been featured by the National Association of Photoshop Professionals for his photo ‘Toast’.  In this arts and culture segment, Christine Lantz brings us the story behind the photo. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AebzK2aW_g0

View-Master

In 1939, a new instrument for displaying photographs was introduced to the world. Viewing black and white stereographic images had been around for decades, but inventor William Gruber and his partners found a unique way to utilize a newly introduced color slide film process called Kodachrome.  
Mounting 7 pairs of pictures on a single disk, allowing two slides to be viewed simultaneously, one with each eye, created the illusion of three-dimensional depth perception. They called it the View-Master and rolled it out at the Worlds Fair in New York. It became an instant sensation.