Watkins Glen

In 1794, John W. Watkins and several other partners purchased 350,000 acres of land near the outlet of Seneca Lake in what is now Schuyler County. The group was intent on creating a new village at the location, surrounded by the natural beauty of the area. The village was originally called Jefferson in 1842, but became Watkins in 1852, and finally, in 1926, Watkins Glen. https://youtu.be/WCEDQbN4q9I

Funding provided by a grant from Empire State Development. Links:
Path Through History: http://paththroughhistory.iloveny.com/
WSKG’s Path Through History: http://www.wskg.org/pth

Montour Falls

Among the many Iroquois villages destroyed during the 1779 Sullivan-Clinton Campaign was She-que-ga, often referred to by travelers as Catharine’s Town. The village, located on the southern bank of Seneca Lake in the heart of present-day Schuyler County, got the nickname from its leader, Queen Catharine Montour. After the war, an influx of white settlers came to the area and in 1802 the first post office opened. Called Havana in 1828, and incorporated in 1836, the village became a prosperous manufacturing town. In 1895, the village changed its name to Montour Falls, in honor of Queen Catharine. https://youtu.be/f048r9fFQqI

Funding provided by a grant from Empire State Development. Links:
Path Through History: http://paththroughhistory.iloveny.com/
WSKG’s Path Through History: http://www.wskg.org/pth

Queen Catharine Montour

In 1779, the American Revolution came to the frontier regions of New York when a Continental expedition led by Major General John Sullivan left a path of destruction in its wake destroying dozens of Native American villages forcing thousands of their inhabitants to flee north to Canada. Among the villages destroyed during the expedition was She-que-ga, often referred to by travelers as Catharine’s Town. The village, located on the southern bank of Seneca Lake, got the nickname from its leader, Queen Catharine Montour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Sb9BIILDtw

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
Schuyler County Historical Society

Photos Courtesy of:
Schuyler County Historical Society
Library of Congress

Cameron Argetsinger

Before World War Two, professional street races, contests on circuits laid out on public roads, had grown in popularity in America in places like Bridgehampton Connecticut, and on Long Island. But shortly after Pearl Harbor all motor racing in America was put on hold. After the war, a young Cornell law student began an effort that would bring road racing back to America. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wjLr9FBQSc

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
Schuyler County Historical Society

Photos Courtesy of:
Schuyler County Historical Society
International Motor Racing Research Library
Library of Congress

Jane A. Delano

In 1917, America entered the hellish nightmare of World War I. During the conflict, nearly 20,000 American nurses served in hospitals across Europe tending to the sick and wounded. The rapid training and deployment of these nurses would not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of one women – Jane A. Delano. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WrTXy3UmFr4

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
Schuyler County Historical Society

Photos Courtesy of:
Schuyler County Historical Society
Library of Congress

Freer's Glen, Circa 1863 | #tbt

Today’s throwback Thursday photograph is a stereographic image of Freer’s Glen, now Watkins Glen State Park, circa 1863. Stereograph photography was very popular during the 19th century. When viewed using a stereoscope, the two almost identical images mounted side-by-side created the illusion of depth, or 3D. Freer’s Glen opened to the public in 1863 as a privately run resort. The area was a popular tourist destination from the very beginning.

Elizabeth Barrett Rothschild

On April 15, 1912, the largest ship of its day, the Titanic, struck an iceberg and sank in the frigid waters of the North Atlantic. Among the 700 survivors plucked from the icy waters that fateful night was Elizabeth Rothschild of Watkins Glenn. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JL0JAabW1no

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
Schuyler County Historical Society

Photos Courtesy of:
Schuyler County Historical Society
Library of Congress
Wikimedia Commons

James Hope

On September 17, 1862 the Battle of Antietam exploded across the streams and fields of a sleepy Maryland town. It would be America’s bloodiest day of the war. Years later, a former soldier from the battle would immortalize the sweeping events of that day in five paintings that were almost lost to history. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMVTbBXLyP4

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
Schuyler County Historical Society

Photos Courtesy of:
Schuyler County Historical Society
Library of Congress
National Parks Service

Jane A. Delano | #tbt

Today’s throwback Thursday photograph is a portrait of Jane Delano, a trailblazer in the field of modern nursing. Delano was born near Montour Falls, New York on March 12, 1862. As a youth, she attended Cook Academy in Montour Falls and eventually enrolled at Bellevue Hospital School of Nursing in New York City. In 1909, Delano was appointed superintendent of the United States Army Nurse Corps and also helped form the American Red Cross Nursing Service. The thousands of nurses Delano helped recruit and train were instrumental in caring for the wounded from the battlefields of World War I and in combating the deadly influenza outbreak of 1919.

Montour Falls, Circa 1863 | #tbt

Today’s vintage throwback Thursday photo shows Main Street in Montour Falls, New York circa 1863. The bridge over the canal that once cut through the center of town is visible in the foreground. The Montour House, built in 1853, is visible on the left side of the photo and the cupola of the Montour Falls Village Hall (formerly the Schuyler County Courthouse) can be seen on the right. In the background, overlooking the entire scene, is the towering 156 foot Shequaga Falls. Today, this area is known as the “Glorious T” and a mix of architectural styles can be seen in this National Historic District.

International Motor Racing Research Center

Located in a town where American motor racing holds court, The International Motor Racing Research Center, on Decatur Street in the Village of Watkins Glen, houses an impressive collection of automotive history and memorabilia. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXCv7b8vQnQ

The center opened its doors to the public in 1999, and today continues its mission to be a world-class leader in the collection and preservation of motor racing heritage. Housed in a two-story brick building, the research center’s collection contains thousands of books, manuscripts, periodicals, and visual works from the history of both amateur and professional motor racing. Whether for the casual visitor or the ardent student of motor sports, the International Motor Racing Research Center offers a wonderful opportunity to learn while having fun along New York’s Path Through History. Photos Courtesy of:
International Motor Racing Research Library

True Love Schooner

In the early days of the twentieth century, the social elite of the world built and sailed magnificent pleasure boats to and from their vacation play-lands. Those days may seem a world away but on Seneca Lake in Schuyler County visitors can travel back to the jazz era when they take an excursion cruise on the “True Love” Schooner. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3RdI8JwgCs

Berthed in Watkins Glen, this 1926 John Alden Malabar VII Schooner has been lovingly restored to its former glory. In the 1950s, The True Love sailed the seas of the Caribbean, and die-hard moviegoers will recognize it as the vessel that Bing Crosby and Grace Kelly sailed on in the film High Society. Today, the True Love sails on Seneca Lake, and visitors can once again feel the breeze through their hair and the mist of the waves on their face at this water bound stop on New York’s Path Through History.

Catharine Valley Trail

In the heart of Schuyler County, nestled just south of Seneca Lake, is Catharine Valley Trail. Here both lovers of nature and history can come together to enjoy the serene beauty of the upstate area. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4wXhyUdwIE

Visitors can trek the nine-mile long trail, which follows abandoned rail lines and former Chemung Canal towpaths, as they traverse through several wildlife habitats in the beautiful outdoors. The trail accommodates both pedestrians and bicyclers, and in the winter months the path is open to cross-county skiers and snowshoers. In the near future the trail will be extended in length and visitors will be able to walk from Watkins Glen to Horseheads.

Watkins Glen State Park

In the heart of the Finger Lakes region lays a magnificent series of gorges and waterfalls that highlight the beauty and power of nature to the visitors of the Watkins Glen State Park in Schuyler County. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N75jau2mQWI

Opened in 1863, the park was first operated as a privately run tourist resort. In 1906, the park was purchased by the State of New York and has evolved into one of the States most popular public attractions. Park visitors can follow a two-mile trail as it snakes its way through a four hundred foot change in elevation, and witness the beauty of nineteen different waterfalls like the Cavern Cascade with its beautiful vistas. The Glen’s camping grounds, Olympic size pool and other amenities help make the stay memorable, but the opportunity to watch thunderous waters as they power their way toward the bottom of the glen cutting through rock and stone make the visit unforgettable.