Talking with Kids About Healthy Habits & Illness

Resources for Parents & Caregivers 

How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus
Daniel Tiger for Parents App

Resources for Kids

DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD:

Doctor Daniel Game
In My Bathroom Game
Play at Home with Daniel Tiger App
“Rest is Best” Strategy Song (video)
Germs Germs Go Away (video)

SESAME STREET:

Abby and Elmo’s Potty Plan! Game
Step by Step Handwashing with Elmo
Elmo and Rosita: The Right Way to Sneeze! (video)

CURIOUS GEORGE:

George the Germophobe (video)

SUPER WHY!:

ABC Scrub With Me! Resources for Educators 

KET’s Healthy Habits | Everyday Learning
Iowa PBS’ The Federal Bureau of Ick
South Florida PBS’ KidVision: How to Make Soap

The NPR Student Podcast Challenge Is Back!

HOW IT WORKS / WHERE TO BEGIN / THE RULES / THE JUDGES / SUBMIT / CONTACT US

NPR is inviting students around the country to create a podcast, then — with the help of a teacher — compete for a chance to win our grand prize and have your work appear on NPR. Be a part of the NPR Student Podcast Challenge. Here’s how it works: Put together a podcast with your class or extracurricular group. Then your teacher can submit it to us. This contest is for teachers with students between 5th and 12th grade.

2019 Rod Serling Film Fest Winners Announced

Congratulations to the winning student filmmakers of the 2019 Rod Serling Film Festival! The students will be honored on Saturday, October 5th, 2019 at The Forum Theatre in Binghamton, NY. Details to follow. The Rod Serling Film Festival is partnering this year with Serling Fest. Details on all activities and ticket information can be found at www.rodserling.com.

Understanding LGBTQ + Identity: A Toolkit for Educators

This collection offers a series of free digital media resources to help administrators, guidance counselors, and educators understand and effectively address the complex and difficult issues faced by LGBTQ students. The video content is scaffolded by a suite of materials (informational text, conversation guides, discussion questions, and teaching tips) to facilitate their use in professional development settings. The collection also has a growing selection of core curriculum video-based content to help educators integrate LGBTQ narratives into ELA and social studies classrooms.

 

 

 

 

Twitter Chat Series: K-12 Digital Citizenship

Join WSKG as our Education Director moderates a series of Twitter chats focused on issues surrounding Digital Citizenship. We’ve invited local guest stars to share their expertise during each chat. Share, learn, and help us to better understand the needs of our K-12 communities in regard to #DigCit! Participants will also have the chance to win prizes throughout each chat. All chats begin at 9pm EST.

"As I knew him, My Dad, Rod Serling" By Anne Serling

2019 Rod Serling Film Festival Accepting Entries

The 2019 Rod Serling Film Festival is open! WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 3, 2019. Entrants must use the online submission form. The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

One Month Left for Students to Enter ‘An Ear for Drama’

You might listen to three podcasts a week, some streaming from a favorite website or others downloaded to your phone… But what entertainment could be found through your headphones before the internet? Enter the RADIO DRAMA! Wikipedia reminds us that radio drama first appeared in the 1920s and quickly rose in popularity. In the 1940s, it was a leading form of popular entertainment for children and adults; and one they often enjoyed together.

‘Best 9-12’ Serling Fest Award Goes to Niskayuna Native

Evan Pritchard is a upstate New York filmmaker from Niskayuna, New York.  He is attending Purchase College as a freshman.  Evan has a strong passion for storytelling and the art of film.  He hopes to someday make his hope and passion into a career.  Evan has previously been honored for his past films Believe and Les Milkerables. What is your film about? 
Why God? Tells the story of a young boy struggling with his faith due to the impact of outside forces in his life. How did you come up with the idea for your film? The idea for this film first stemmed from a single sentence I wrote down in passing – “Religion and Culture today”.  At the time I was thinking mostly the Islamophobia going on within our society today.  As the idea and sentence began to grow I realized the best way to show a story about holding faith when religion is looked down upon, was to tell my own story.

Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids

One in five American children has a hard time learning to read. Many of these kids have dyslexia. There are proven ways to help people with dyslexia learn, and a federal law that’s supposed to ensure that schools provide kids with help. But across the country, public schools are denying children proper treatment and often failing to identify them with dyslexia in the first place. This APM Reports documentary investigates why and explores how improving things for dyslexic kids could help all students learn to read better.

Shadow Class: College Dreamers in Trump’s America

Public schools in the United States have to treat undocumented students like citizens. But once these students graduate, everything changes. Without papers, they don’t qualify for federal college grants, they can’t legally work to pay for tuition, and they may have to pay out-of-state tuition. Some young immigrants received temporary papers under an Obama administrative program, but now they find themselves on a collision course with newly powerful opponents, including a president who swept into office on a wave of anti-immigrant fear and anger. APM Reports follows immigrant students under the Trump administration.

Maine-Endwell Students Present 'Positively Social'

Positively Social is a video about digital citizenship and the positive impact that responsible technology use, and social media, have on youth. It is a production of the Maine-Endwell Central School District. https://youtu.be/BTMIryyR-nI

What are your thoughts on this issue? Tweet to our Education Director at @LuckyMamaJ.  

One Week Left to Enter Annual Writing Contest

The PBS KIDS Writers Contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest Entry Form & Rules

Submissions must be postmarked by April 28, 2017 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

Four Weeks Left for Children to Enter Annual Writing Contest

The PBS KIDS Writers Contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest Entry Form & Rules

Submissions must be postmarked by April 28, 2017 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

K-12 Students Invited to Submit Short Films to Festival

The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 26, 2017. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Two Weeks Left for Students to Enter Radio Drama Contest

Wikipedia reminds us that radio drama first appeared in the 1920s and quickly rose in popularity. In the 1940s, it was a leading form of popular entertainment for children and adults; and one they often enjoyed together. The invention of the television stunted this popularity, but radio dramas have continued to be produced over the past 90 years. What will happen if we combine the creative writing of students and teachers with the audio technology of 2017? (Something awesome, we think!)
Teachers and students: Create a script for a 15-minute radio drama that will air on WSKG Radio!

Independent Lens | The Bad Kids

Located in an impoverished Mojave Desert community, Black Rock Continuation High School is a last-chance alternative for students who’ve fallen so far behind in credits that they have no hope of earning a diploma at a traditional school. Extraordinary educators believe empathy and life skills, more than academics, give these underserved students command of their own futures. This coming-of-age story watches education combat the crippling effects of poverty in the lives of so-called “bad kids.” Premiering Monday, March 20, 2017 at 10:00pm on WSKG TV. https://youtu.be/0RukXyvLxm8

 

Annual Writing Contests Await Stories from Youth

The PBS KIDS Writers Contest is designed to promote the advancement of children’s reading skills through hands-on, active learning. It encourages children in grades K-3 in communities across the country to celebrate the power of creating stories and illustrations by submitting their own original pieces.  The contest extends the powerful tradition and annual success of the national “Reading Rainbow Young Writers and Illustrators Contest.” In 2014, the WSKG Youth Writers Contest launched in an effort to offer older students a unique writing opportunity, too!  This local contest is open to students in grades 4, 5, and 6. PBS KIDS Writers Contest (K-3) Entry Form
PBS KIDS Writers Contest Rules
WSKG Youth Writers Contest Entry Form & Rules

Submissions must be postmarked by April 28, 2017 and mailed to:

PBS Kids Writers Contest
c/o WSKG Public Media
Attn: J. Stapleton
601 Gates Road
Vestal, New York 13850

Questions ? Contact jstapleton@wskg.org

Student Films Sought for Annual Serling Festival

The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 26, 2017. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

'An Ear for Drama' Project Open to Students

You might listen to three podcasts a week, some streaming from a favorite website or others downloaded to your phone… But what entertainment could be found through your headphones before the internet? Enter the RADIO DRAMA! Wikipedia reminds us that radio drama first appeared in the 1920s and quickly rose in popularity. In the 1940s, it was a leading form of popular entertainment for children and adults; and one they often enjoyed together.

District to Host 'Digital Citizenship Summit EDU'

Maine-Endwell School District is sponsoring the Digital Citizenship Summit, a free event open to students, parents, educators and all members of the community. Learn how students can harness the power of digital technology to make the world a better place. The event will feature keynote speaker, Curran Dee. Curran is a fourth grader and the Chief Kid Officer of DigCitKids, and a TEDxYouth speaker. He created DigCitKids to combat the lack of digital access at his school.

Local Teens Share Hopes & Concerns for the Country

Students in Carrie Tracey’s English classes at Union-Endicott School District’s Tiger Ventures spent the fall semester discussing critical issues facing their community and the nation. Their ideas went into a writing assignment, part of Letters to the Next President 2.0, a project aimed at engaging youth ages 13-18 across the U.S.

 

Listen to this audio postcard produced by WSKG’s Sarah Gager, which highlights some of the ideas and voices of Tiger Ventures students that participated in Letters to the Next President 2.0.  

This visual slideshow offers additional insight into the experience that these local students had including diversity of expression – through full letters, photos, graphics, and focus statements – crafted by and with the students. Interested in trying something similar in your classroom? Check out this project overview and modify as needed.

What Do Youth Have to Say to the Next President?

Letters to the Next President 2.0 engages and connects young people, aged 13–18, as they research, write, and make media to voice their opinions on issues that matter to them in the coming election. While candidates and media concentrated on issues that mattered to voters in the 2016 election season, teachers and students in our nation’s schools will concentrated on issues that matter to the next generation of voters. Check out the national archive of youth voices that contributed to Letters to the Next President. Interested in trying this in your classroom? If your students had 60 seconds to tell the next president of the United States about an issue they care about, what would they say? Note: This lesson plan is adapted from the PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs curriculum.

PRX Education Specials to Air on WSQX Radio

College Choice: the Value of It All (PRX)
Saturday, December 10, 2016 | 10:00am
A long held mantra – that the best investment is a good education – is increasingly being called into question. In that context, NPR’s Robert Siegel set out to learn how nine bright and engaging college students feel now about the choices they made back then. We’ve gathered together the highlights of Robert’s reporting for All Things Considered into a single hour-long narrative, driven by these questions and these students. Stuck at Square One: The Remedial Education Trap (PRX)
Saturday, December 17, 2016 | 10:00am  
When students go to college, they expect to be in college classes. But in fact, 4 in 10 students end up in basic remedial math and English, re-learning what they were supposed to learn in high school.

2017 Rod Serling Film Festival Opens

The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 26, 2017. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Don’t Underestimate the Power of an Informal Education Experience

WSKG sat down with Binghamton, NY native Liam Walsh, student filmmaker, to reflect on his experience with the Rod Serling Film Festival. His high school teacher, Mr. Keith Rosko, also talked with us. Walsh took the ‘Best in Show’ award in the 2016 Festival and has since moved on to college. The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival will open in January. https://youtu.be/iOBmEXSWWAk?t=1m45s

Don't Underestimate the Power of an Informal Education Experience

WSKG sat down with Binghamton, NY native Liam Walsh, student filmmaker, to reflect on his experience with the Rod Serling Film Festival. His high school teacher, Mr. Keith Rosko, also talked with us. Walsh took the ‘Best in Show’ award in the 2016 Festival and has since moved on to college. The 2017 Rod Serling Film Festival will open in January. https://youtu.be/iOBmEXSWWAk?t=1m45s

Rod Serling Film Festival Open to the Community

On Sunday, October 16, 2016 join WSKG at the Art Mission and Theater as we celebrate expression through film! Activities of the Art Mission’s Binghamton Babylon Film Festival run throughout the weekend and Sunday marks the annual Rod Serling Film Festival.  Winning student films will screen at 4:00pm and 5:30pm. Admission is free and there is a suggested donation in support of the Art Mission. Anne Serling will be on site from 3:00pm-4:00pm hosting a book signing.

What Would You Do With A Trillion Dollars? Students Respond Through Short Film.

This is a short video collaboratively made by Buffalo Youth Media Institute students at the Buffalo Center for Art and Technology. The students were asked to explore the question of what they would do with a trillion dollars.  Congratulations to student filmmakers Jefferson Manuel, Wilson Morerro, and Saeed Muhammad for winning the honor of ‘Best Social Commentary’ in the 2016 Rod Serling Film Festival. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JqUkXBO4Pc&feature=youtu.be

The 2016 Rod Serling Film Festival will be held at the Art Mission & Theater on October 16, 2016 and all winning selections can be found here.

Claymation Abounds in Film Created By Northeast Bradford Students

‘Park Problems’ was recently awarded the ‘Best 6-8’ award in the 2016 Rod Serling Film Festival. John Pilvelis, Art/Gifted Program Teacher at Northeast Bradford School District, served as mentor to the students that created this film. He took some time to gather feedback from his students regarding their experience on this project:

What is your film about?  Can you summarize it in a few sentences? Our film involves a boy who tries to practice his clarinet in the park. Various animals get involved and complicate matters.

Film Follows Two Teens Over Course of Five Years in 'All the Difference'

The largely invisible and often crushing struggles of young African-American men come vividly — and heroically — to life in All the Difference, which traces the paths of two teens from the South Side of Chicago who dream of graduating from college. Statistics predict that Robert and Krishaun will drop out of high school, but they have other plans. Oscar®-nominated producer/director Tod Lending’s intimate film, executive produced by author Wes Moore, follows the young men through five years of hard work, sacrifice, setbacks and uncertainty. As they discover, support from family, teachers and mentors makes all the difference in defying the odds. Airs on WSKG TV Monday, September 12, 2016 at 10:00pm as part of the PBS Spotlight Education week of special programming.

Honoring Education Through 'PBS Spotlight Education' Week

Spotlight Education is a week of primetime programming airing on WSKG from September 12, 2016 through September 17, 2016.. It features films and documentaries, including special episodes of NOVA, FRONTLINE and PBS NEWSHOUR, a new documentary from POV, and the premiere of TED TALKS, “The Education Revolution.” It concludes with the 5th annual AMERICAN GRADUATE DAY, a broadcast about individuals and non-profit organizations dedicated to helping youth stay on track to high school graduation. This collection features resources about intervention and success strategies, 21st Century learners, and examines how the dedication to teaching all children, especially at-risk students, makes a real difference in communities. New resources will be added to reflect the programming. Spotlight Education celebrates the work of teachers and educators and underscores the importance of convening a dialogue around education.

Celebrating Graduation with the Class of… 2023?

Graduation season is in full swing across upstate New York. Hundreds of teenagers are taking that walk across the stage to receive their high school diploma. How exciting! But we can’t forget about the younger students who also have exciting milestones to celebrate with the end of a school year. Let’s spend some time talking about their achievements and keeping them motivated to reach graduation! Elizabeth Bigsby, used-to-be fifth grader from Union-Endicott, thanks her dad for supporting her in school and calculates that she will be a member of the Class of 2023!

Last Call for Entries to the 'Rod Serling Film Fest'

The 2016 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 27, 2016. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Teen Thanks a Whole Team of Champions

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we asked students to tell us about the person, place, or program that helps them find successful in school.  
Autumn Roach doesn’t have a champion. She has a whole team of supporters helping her toward graduation! Autumn Roach is working toward her high school diploma from EverTech Academy at Broome Tioga BOCES in Binghamton, NY.

Teen Honors Teacher and 'Grandfather I Never Had'

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we asked students to tell us about the person, place, or program that helps them find successful in school.  
Michael Feeney credits his monitor as the reason he comes to school and the reason he’s even still in school. Michael Feeney is working toward his high school diploma from EverTech Academy at Broome Tioga BOCES in Binghamton, NY. He is studying Masonry in the Center for Career & Technical Excellence.

Students Recognize Faith and Family as Their Personal Champions

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we asked students to tell us about the person, place, or program that helps them find successful in school.  
For Dominic Mooney and Patrick McKnight, faith and family are the ‘champions’ keeping them on the path to graduate from high school. Dominic Mooney is working toward his high school diploma from EverTech Academy at Broome Tioga BOCES in Binghamton, NY. He is studying Retail Warehousing Skills in the Center for Career & Technical Excellence.

Seniors Reflect on Personal Success Found in Career-Tech Education

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we asked students to tell us about the person, place, or program that helps them find successful in school.  
Thomas Adams and Siena Petrilli point to life-changing educators as their champions: keeping them on the path to graduation and headed toward success after high school. Thomas Adams is working toward his high school diploma from EverTech Academy at Broome Tioga BOCES in Binghamton, NY. He is studying Carpentry in the Center for Career & Technical Excellence.

Art Class Keeps Teen on Path to Graduation

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we asked students to tell us about the person, place, or program that helps them find successful in school.  
Marisa Wolfanger credits art teacher for success at new school and confidence in her own future
Marisa is working toward her high school diploma from EverTech Academy at Broome Tioga BOCES in Binghamton, NY. She is studying Culinary Arts in the Center for Career & Technical Excellence. After graduation, Marisa plans to enter the workforce and perhaps attend college to study art or animation. Submitted by Marisa Wolfanger:
My champion is someone who was here for me since day one.

Teen Thanks Mom for Strength, Guidance, and Education

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we asked students to tell us about the person, place, or program that helps them find successful in school.  
Jordan Ballard’s powerful poem shares her experience with self-harm, anxiety, and suicide all to thank one person: her mom. Jordan is working toward her high school diploma from EverTech Academy at Broome Tioga BOCES in Binghamton, NY. She is studying Business Management in the Center for Career & Technical Excellence. After graduation, Jordan plans to enter the workforce and attend college for music.

Honoring Grandmother's Wish Keeps Student on Track to Graduate

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we asked students to tell us about the person, place, or program that helps them find successful in school.  
When Kevin Eaton considers giving up on school, he thinks of his grandma and the final promise he made – to graduate from high school. Kevin is working toward his high school diploma from EverTech Academy at Broome Tioga BOCES in Binghamton, NY. He is studying Carpentry in the Center for Career & Technical Excellence.

Music and Mom Help Student Reach Graduation

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we asked students to tell us about the person, place, or program that helps them find successful in school.  
Flo Wolf credits her mom’s support in making it through mental, emotional, and physical obstacles. Flo is working toward her high school diploma from EverTech Academy at Broome Tioga BOCES in Binghamton, NY. She is studying Business Management in the Center for Career & Technical Excellence.

With Mother's Help, Student Reaches Full Potential

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we asked students to tell us about the person, place, or program that helps them find successful in school.  
Brieona Turner celebrates the person who helps her the most: her mom. Brieona is working toward her high school diploma from EverTech Academy at Broome Tioga BOCES in Binghamton, NY. She is studying Computer Aided Design in the Center for Career & Technical Excellence.

Youth Film Festival Seeks Entries

The 2016 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 27, 2016. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Follow First Generation College Students in 'Why Not Us?'

Follow the journeys of four young people—all first in their families to go to college—as they road-trip across the country to interview inspiring individuals who were also first in their families to pursue higher education. After gaining wisdom and guidance from trail-blazing leaders—including Anna Maria Chávez, CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA, Grammy Award-winner John Legend, and Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz—the Roadtrippers are emboldened to embrace the opportunities ahead and ask “why shouldn’t I succeed?”
Watch on WSKG TV March 26, 2016 at 5:30am.  Check out a preview of the program:

'Is School Enough?' Provokes Thinking of New Modes of Education

Is School Enough? documents vivid examples of where new modes of learning and engagement are taking hold and flourishing. Featuring nationally recognized educators and researchers, Stephen Brown’s powerful stories show that when students have the opportunity to explore real interests and problems, they step up and perform at the highest level. This new approach reaches motivated students as well as kids that educators call “the bright and bored,” helping these learners tune in rather than drop out. Is School Enough?

Opportunity for Youth Filmmakers

The 2016 Rod Serling Film Festival is now open. WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 27, 2016. Entrants must use the online submission form . The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

Female Students Pursue Male-Dominated Careers from 'Outside The Box'

PBS Newshour Student Reporting Labs launches series on teens challenging gender stereotypes
From new military combat roles for women to Hollywood pay equity, gender politics played a big role in the news this past year. But how do preconceived notions about gender affect the lives of middle and high school students?  
Just As Strong
High school students Channell Rogers and Sierra Buster refuse to let gender stereotypes prevent them from pursuing a hobby they both enjoy, building, and a career goal they both aspire to, the construction business. https://vimeo.com/148130114

Produced by Jayla Hope, Jute’ius Jasper and Timia Moore, students at Hughes STEM High School in Cincinnati, Ohio. Instruction provided by SRL Connected Educators Melissa Sherman.

Only boy on the color guard team from 'Outside The Box'

PBS Newshour Student Reporting Labs launches series on teens challenging gender stereotypes: Outside The Box

From new military combat roles for women to Hollywood pay equity, gender politics played a big role in the news this past year. But how do preconceived notions about gender affect the lives of middle and high school students? Watch: Despite Judgment 
A year ago, Elijah Durand never would have dreamed of joining his high school color guard. Now the only boy on the team, Elijah appreciates the creative expression, weaponry and competition involved in interpreting music and entertaining an audience. Produced by Ashley Martinez, Erica Holm, Caroline Munoz, and Demetri Yanes, students at Communications Arts High School in San Antonio, Texas.

National Mentoring Month Continues

A mentor is defined as “someone who teaches, gives help and advice to… often a younger person.”  Public media calls them #AmGrad Champions.  See some of the mentors making a difference in the lives of youth across the country when you visit the American Graduate website! WSKG highlights local mentors and champions here:

Share your mentor story with us at @WSKG using the hashtag #UpstateGrad!

New youth-produced video series 'Outside The Box'

PBS Newshour Student Reporting Labs launches series on teens challenging gender stereotypes

From new military combat roles for women to Hollywood pay equity, gender politics played a big role in the news this past year. But how do preconceived notions about gender affect the lives of middle and high school students? PBS Student Reporting Labs across the country were challenged to profile young people breaking down stereotypes. How does it feel to be the only girl in the room or only boy on the team? These stories include young welders, pilots, hunters, dancers and game designers.

Students & Teachers: Deadline approaching!

A friendly reminder that reflections, artwork, or media pieces for Who’s Your Champion? are due soon! Submissions must be received by Wednesday, January 27, 2016 to be featured in WSKG’s American Graduate project. Read this for details and submission form. Quick reminder of what we’re looking for:
Stories and anecdotes from children, teens, and young adults
Creative ways of thanking your champion
Celebrating someone who helps (or helped) you be successful in school
Write a poem about your experience. Instagram a selfie with your champion, commenting how she helps you.

Testing, Opting-Out and Parental Engagement

The Connect New York series explores statewide issues of critical importance with monthly, one-hour panel discussions about education issues including: Common Core standards, teacher evaluation, school financing, achievement gaps, testing and opting out, and legal challenges. This episode focuses on testing, opting out and parental engagement in New York’s schools. We visit a school in the Elmira Heights School District and speak with its superintendent as well as teachers and parents. The program will focus on the response by the families of 240,000 New York students who opted out of the state administered exams in 2015 and the recently announced changes by the state and federal education departments. Susan Arbetter, host of “The Capitol Pressroom” serves as show host, and moderates a panel conversation with NYS Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia.

180 Days: Hartsville

Experience a year of a Southern town’s efforts to address the urgent demand for reform in American public schools, and watch what happens when the systems that can either fuel or diffuse that reform — bureaucracy, economic opportunity and fixed mindsets — interact and intersect. https://youtu.be/UFXQcGLjgOs
Watch episode 1 on December 5th at 5:30am and episode 2 on December 12th at 5:30am on WSKG TV.

WSKG ASKS: Who's Your Champion?

As part of WSKG’s program on graduation, we want to hear about the person, place, program, or support that is helping you be successful in school. Introduce us to your champion! (Submit your own stories in the form below.)

Champions go by many titles: teacher, coach, neighbor, friend, boss, classmate, or parent… Just to name a few! Recent graduates are also welcome! If you could have held the microphone on graduation day, who is the person you would most like to thank?

American Graduate Day | LIVE

Tune in to PBS on Saturday, October 3rd from 11:00am-6pm ET for the fourth annual American Graduate Day, broadcast live from Tisch WNET Studios at Lincoln Center.  Watch the program live online or on WSKG TV (which will feature local highlights!). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUuo9LiRLjM
American Graduate Day is a full-day multi-platform event live featuring local and national programming, community partners, and celebrities, to celebrate the exceptional work of the individuals and groups whose ongoing efforts and daily heroics help youth stay on track to earn high school diplomas. @Amerigrad | #AmGrad | @WSKG | #UpstateGrad

From Boots to Books: Student Veterans and the New GI Bill

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Teaching Teachers

WSQX Radio | Sunday, August 30, 2015 at 10:00am

WSKG Radio | Monday, August 31, 2015 at 8:00pm

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they’re on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

The Living Legacy: Black Colleges in the 21st Century

WSQX Radio | Sunday, August 23, 2015 at 10:00am

WSKG Radio | Monday, August 24, 2015 at 8:00pm

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial — and unique — role.

The Great Thanksgiving Listen

 

If you are a regular listener to WSKG you’re probably familiar with StoryCorps from their weekly broadcasts on NPR’s Morning Edition. The organization started collecting stories back in 2003 and every interview is archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. The conversations shared by StoryCorps on NPR are often thought provoking and emotionally powerful. On more than one occasion I’ve been brought to tears during my morning commute. But beyond their emotional resonance, the interviews represent one of the largest oral history projects of its kind and offer people a unique look at many fascinating and important aspects of American life.

Program Places Lens on a Typical Day in a U.S. Public School

Go Public: A Day in the Life of an American School District documents a single day in an urban public school district, from sun up to long after sundown. On May 8, 2012, 50 directors and their small camera crews followed 50 individuals who attend, support and work in the Pasadena Unified School District, a racially and economically diverse district with 28 public school campuses. Administrators, teachers, students, support staff and volunteers lead us on journeys that reveal their unique contributions in making a public school district function. No voice-over narratives or expert commentaries, just an authentic window into the world of public education. Go Public gives audiences a chance to see and hear the people actually living the public school experience.

Homework Hotline

Homework Hotline is a live statewide call-in show where kids receive help with homework problems right on the air. Designed for children in grades four through 12, the program
provides the tools students need to succeed with homework, and supports academic achievement across a variety of New York State Learning Standards. Teachers from Rochester Dial-A-Teacher take the calls and send them to WXXI studios in Rochester, where host teachers, who are experts in subjects across the curriculum, are standing by ready to help kids work through their homework. In addition to providing homework help,  Homework Hotline presents daily thematic segments on health, animals, book reviews, history, environment issues, and people and places in New York State. This season, the series will host special segments on governmental issues in preparation for the upcoming election and an American Graduateseries that focuses on the increased high school dropout rate and America’s efforts to combat this issue.