2019 Rod Serling Film Fest Winners Announced

Congratulations to the winning student filmmakers of the 2019 Rod Serling Film Festival! The students will be honored on Saturday, October 5th, 2019 at The Forum Theatre in Binghamton, NY. Details to follow. The Rod Serling Film Festival is partnering this year with Serling Fest. Details on all activities and ticket information can be found at www.rodserling.com.

Understanding LGBTQ + Identity: A Toolkit for Educators

This collection offers a series of free digital media resources to help administrators, guidance counselors, and educators understand and effectively address the complex and difficult issues faced by LGBTQ students. The video content is scaffolded by a suite of materials (informational text, conversation guides, discussion questions, and teaching tips) to facilitate their use in professional development settings. The collection also has a growing selection of core curriculum video-based content to help educators integrate LGBTQ narratives into ELA and social studies classrooms.

 

 

 

 

Twitter Chat Series: K-12 Digital Citizenship

Join WSKG as our Education Director moderates a series of Twitter chats focused on issues surrounding Digital Citizenship. We’ve invited local guest stars to share their expertise during each chat. Share, learn, and help us to better understand the needs of our K-12 communities in regard to #DigCit! Participants will also have the chance to win prizes throughout each chat. All chats begin at 9pm EST.

Announcing the NPR Student Podcast Challenge

HOW IT WORKS / WHERE TO BEGIN / THE RULES / THE JUDGES / CONTACT US

Have something to say? Now is your chance. We’re inviting students around the country to create a podcast, then — with the help of a teacher — compete for a chance to win our grand prize and have your work appear on NPR. Be a part of the first-ever NPR Student Podcast Challenge.  

Here’s how it works: Put together a podcast with your class or extracurricular group.

"As I knew him, My Dad, Rod Serling" By Anne Serling

2019 Rod Serling Film Festival Accepting Entries

The 2019 Rod Serling Film Festival is open! WSKG is accepting submissions from K-12 students through May 3, 2019. Entrants must use the online submission form. The Festival is held in honor of Rod Serling and his work, which has had a lasting influence on the television industry and media creation. The Festival seeks to inspire the next generation of filmmakers.

One Month Left for Students to Enter ‘An Ear for Drama’

You might listen to three podcasts a week, some streaming from a favorite website or others downloaded to your phone… But what entertainment could be found through your headphones before the internet? Enter the RADIO DRAMA! Wikipedia reminds us that radio drama first appeared in the 1920s and quickly rose in popularity. In the 1940s, it was a leading form of popular entertainment for children and adults; and one they often enjoyed together.

‘Best 9-12’ Serling Fest Award Goes to Niskayuna Native

Evan Pritchard is a upstate New York filmmaker from Niskayuna, New York.  He is attending Purchase College as a freshman.  Evan has a strong passion for storytelling and the art of film.  He hopes to someday make his hope and passion into a career.  Evan has previously been honored for his past films Believe and Les Milkerables. What is your film about? 
Why God? Tells the story of a young boy struggling with his faith due to the impact of outside forces in his life. How did you come up with the idea for your film? The idea for this film first stemmed from a single sentence I wrote down in passing – “Religion and Culture today”.  At the time I was thinking mostly the Islamophobia going on within our society today.  As the idea and sentence began to grow I realized the best way to show a story about holding faith when religion is looked down upon, was to tell my own story.

Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids

One in five American children has a hard time learning to read. Many of these kids have dyslexia. There are proven ways to help people with dyslexia learn, and a federal law that’s supposed to ensure that schools provide kids with help. But across the country, public schools are denying children proper treatment and often failing to identify them with dyslexia in the first place. This APM Reports documentary investigates why and explores how improving things for dyslexic kids could help all students learn to read better.