Chesapeake Bay by Air

Chesapeake Bay By Air can be seen on WSKG TV March 9, 2016 at 10pm.  

Shot in the air from two to two thousand feet, Chesapeake Bay by Air’s unique perspective of the Chesapeake Bay marries gentle verse, prose and music with stunningly dramatic images of the Chesapeake in a way that, until now, only migrating Canada Geese could truly appreciate. Chesapeake Bay by Air’s meandering aerial journey transports viewers to many of the Chesapeake Bay’s countless stunning locations — from a purple-orange dawn over the Susquehanna River to the mystery of the carved marsh of Blackwater Wildlife Refuge. From the tranquil fishing village of Smith Island to the belching smokestacks of Sparrow’s Point, from ancient Calvert Cliffs to bustling small-city Annapolis and metropolis Baltimore, from the mighty steel spans of the Chesapeake Bay Bridges and then to historic Point Lookout, Chesapeake by Air brings the bay into razor-sharp perspective, from well above the din. Other points of interest include Smith Island, the last water-bound home to Chesapeake watermen; Crisfield, Maryland’s seafood capitol; St.

Study of sick bass in Susquehanna cites endocrine disrupters

The number of young bass that survive to become adults has plummeted in about 100 miles of the Lower Susquehanna, as well as parts of the Juniata, over the last decade. (Karl Blankenship)

 

By Karl Blankenship

Karl Blankenship is editor of the Bay Journal and Executive Director of Chesapeake Media Service. He has served as editor of the Bay Journal since its inception in 1991.  

According to the Chesapeake Bay Journal,  a recent study indicates the smallmouth bass population in the Susquehanna River are suffering a population collapse possibly connected to hormone-altering compounds and herbicides, weakening their immune systems.

The multi-year study, which involved dozens of scientists from multiple state and federal agencies as well as universities, said that exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds and herbicides, along with infections from parasites and pathogens, were the “most likely” reasons that few young smallmouth bass in the river have survived to become adults since 2005. Several studies have found evidence of endocrine disrupters, which interfere with the hormone system in animals and fish, around the Bay watershed.