Tompkins/Cortland Assemblywoman Barbara Lifton On 2019 Legislative Session

ITHACA, NY (WSKG) – The 2019 New York legislative session saw the passage of a raft of legislation that has been blocked in previous years. Assemblywoman Barbara Lifton spoke with WSKG’s Celia Clarke in the Ithaca studio. She represents Tompkins County and part of Cortland County in the state Assembly. Lifton spoke about the new farm labor rights, legalization of electrically-assisted bicycles and scooters, and why she thinks marijuana legalization is inevitable. The conversation begins with Lifton talking what she considers the most important accomplishment of the session.

Ithaca Mayoral Race Now Contested

In his bid for a third term, Ithaca Mayor Svante Myrick has an opponent  The Tompkins County Board of Election confirmed that Adam Levine will be on the November ballot.

A Tompkins County Food Pantry Re-Opens After Temporary Suspension

ENFIELD, NY (WSKG) – The Enfield Food Pantry has re-opened. It was temporarily suspended by the Food Bank of the Southern Tier for potential rodent problems.

Enfield is about 6 miles from Ithaca. About three weeks ago, Food Bank of the Southern Tier stopped delivering food to the pantry until they did a few things to prevent rodents from getting in. The town owns the building where the pantry’s located. So, the Town Board, Pantry volunteers and the Food Bank came together to resolve the problems.

Now, the food pantry has freshly spackled and painted walls to keep rodents from getting in.

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How To Deal With Overcrowding At The Tompkins County Jail

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The Tompkins County Jail is overcrowded. The firm doing a study on how to bring the numbers down is presenting their findings Thursday evening. For a long time, the state granted the jail a waiver to go overcapacity, but last year told them to find a long term solution. So, the legislature hired a Rochester consulting company – the Center for Governmental Research – to analyze the programs inside and outside the jail – programs like substance abuse treatment, house arrest bracelets, and drug courts. The major finding of the study: don’t add more beds to the jail, instead, expand the programs. Overall, Paula Ioanide, Assistant Professor at Ithaca College and member of the criminal justice reform group, Decarcerate Tompkins, appreciated how comprehensive the study is.

Won’t You be my Neighbor | Chords of Memory

In this episode of Chords of Memory we highlight the photography of Verne Morton, a photographer from Groton, New York. Joanna Patchett sings the theme from Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, “Won’t You be my Neighbor”. Photographs courtesy of the History Center in Tompkins County. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=liAGx7MkyUM

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives.

The Photography of Sol Goldberg | Chords of Memory

In this episode of Chords of Memory we highlight the photography of Sol Goldberg, a photographer from Ithaca, New York. Joanna Patchett sings “Mister Sun”. Photographs courtesy of the History Center in Tompkins County. https://youtu.be/oIfsrP0ii94

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives.

The Photography of Verne Morton | Chords of Memory

In this episode of Chords of Memory we highlight the photography of Verne Morton, a photographer from Groton, New York. Brian Hyland provides the music, playing the traditional Irish tune “The South Wind”. Photographs courtesy of the History Center in Tompkins County. https://youtu.be/2CDSl2dANz0

Chords of Memory is a web series from WSKG that combines historic photographs with local musical talent. In each episode, a local artist provides the musical backdrop to a showcase of hand-selected images from various photographic archives.

Trumansburg

In 1792, Abner Treman was awarded 600 acres of land in New York State for his service in the Revolutionary War. Located on the western rim of the Cayuga Valley, Treman’s parcel had been occupied for centuries by the Haudenosaunee. Abundant with timber and fertile farmland, Treman, his brother-in law John McLallan and their families settled in the area, cleared land, planted crops and built a grist mill. A small community developed and quickly grew. Incorporated in 1872 as “Tremain’s Village,” it was later renamed “Trumansburg.”

Funding provided by a grant from Empire State Development.

Ithaca

In 1794, Simeon DeWitt received 1,400 acres located along the southern banks of Cayuga Lake from his father-in-law. DeWitt divided the land into lots and in 1807 he named the new community Ithaca. Ithaca incorporated as a village and became the county seat in 1817. https://youtu.be/6yVimUgsNlY

Funding provided by a grant from Empire State Development. Links:
Path Through History: http://paththroughhistory.iloveny.com/
WSKG’s Path Through History: http://www.wskg.org/pth

Dryden

In 1787, the first settlers arrived to form a new Tompkins County community named for English poet John Dryden. Dryden, New York was established on land set aside as the Central New York Military Tract, and the land was to be used in place of pay for Revolutionary War veterans. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkyCX4osQbI

Funding provided by a grant from Empire State Development.

Simeon De Witt

At the close of the American Revolution, settlers flooded into the frontier regions of New York looking for a fresh start and new opportunities. The task of mapping and surveying the uncharted wilderness of the new nation fell upon intrepid surveyors like Simeon De Witt. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcB8yAuMIwg

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
The History Center in Tompkins County

Photos Courtesy of:
The History Center in Tompkins County
Library of Congress
Wikimedia Commons

Jacob Yaple, Isaac Dumond, and Peter Hinepaw

In 1789, Jacob Yaple, Isaac Dumond, and Peter Hinepaw and their families left on a perilous two-month journey from Kingston New York to the shores of Cayuga Lake. When they reached Cayuga Lake, the three families went about building log cabins and planting corn. Their small community was completely surrounded and isolated by the wilderness; however in time the settlement thrived and grew to become what is now the city of Ithaca. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gh2os3CxsiU

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
The History Center in Tompkins County

Photos Courtesy of:
The History Center in Tompkins County
Library of Congress
Wikimedia Commons

State Street in Ithaca, NY | #tbt

Today’s throwback Thursday photograph is a shot of State Street in Ithaca, NY taken sometime between 1890 and 1901. The photo looks east along State Street in downtown Ithaca, where the Ithaca Commons is located today. In the 1790s, Simeon DeWitt, the New York State Surveyor General, first surveyed and mapped the area that would become downtown Ithaca. The Commons opened in 1975 as a three-block pedestrian mall and continues to serve as a popular destination for travelers and Ithacans alike. What is most striking about this photograph is the number of different vignettes it captures.

Andrew Dickson White

Today Cornell University enrolls over 20,000 students in 14 different colleges and schools, but when its door’s first opened in the fall of 1868 the university had just one building and 412 students. One man would do more to help guide the fledging university through its initial years and set it on course to become one of the greatest institutes of higher education in the county. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMn8awTI_1I

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
The History Center in Tompkins County

Photos Courtesy of:
The History Center in Tompkins County
Library of Congress
Wikimedia Commons

Peter Webb

In 1805, John J. Speed brought a young 13-year-old slave named Peter from Virginia to the Town of Caroline, New York near Ithaca. After arriving in New York, Peter continued to serve the Speed family, but he also possessed a growing desire to be free. In 1813, Peter made an arrangement with his master that would allow him to purchase his own freedom. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLUJc9rUbkg

‘Uniquely New York’ is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Links:
Path Through History
WSKG’s Path Through History
The History Center in Tompkins County

Photos Courtesy of:
The History Center in Tompkins County
Library of Congress
Wikimedia Commons

Tompkins County Farmer during the Great Depression | #tbt

Jack Delano took today’s throwback Thursday photograph in September 1940. It shows a farmer cutting a field of buckwheat along Route 79, near Ithaca, New York. This photo is just one of 170,000 photographs that were taken by the Farm Security Administration during the Great Depression. Between 1935 and 1945, the Farm Security Administrations and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) sent photographers across the country to document the effects of the depression and to help build support for New Deal relief programs. Photographers included Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, and Arthur Rothstein. The program also produced some of the most iconic images of the era.

Groton, NY | #tbt

Today’s throwback Thursday photograph overlooks Groton, New York. This peaceful winter scene was taken by Verne Morton  in 1904. Morton was born in Groton in 1868. He began taking pictures in the late 1890s, and specialized in documenting rural life. Today, the majority of Morton’s original negatives are preserved by the History Center in Tompkins County.

PBS's 'In Defense of Food' features Cornell Professor and Lansing High School

“Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” With that, food journalist Michael Pollan answers one of the most frequently asked questions of our time – what should we eat to be healthy? In the new PBS show In Defense of Food (check out our preview), Pollan takes us on a journey through the American food system, showing what and how we make up our diet.

Horse Logging | #tbt

Today’s throwback Thursday photograph shows a scene of horse logging in Tompkins County, New York. Groton native, Verne Morton, took the photo in 1910. Morton began taking pictures in the late 1890s, and eventually gave up a career as a teacher to pursue photography full-time. Morton’s specialty was photographing the outdoors, especially images of farm scenes and rural life. Morton lived in Groton for the majority of his life, capturing the history of the surrounding communities in over 12,000 beautifully composed images.

Wharton Studios

Wharton Inc.

In 1914, Theodore Wharton and his brother Leopold opened Wharton Inc., a silent film studio in Ithaca, NY. Between 1914 and 1919, the studio produced over a 100 different short and feature length movies. The majority of the films were action-adventure and comedy serials, featuring stars such as Pearl White, Oliver Hardy, Irene Castle, and Lionel Barrymore. The Wharton Brothers also utilized Ithaca storefronts and the majestic gorges and waterfalls of Tompkins County as the backdrops to many of their films. Sadly, the studio fell into tough financial straits and had to close its doors in 1919. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UNVwpXAxEU

Today, the Ithaca Motion Picture Project has plans to convert the former Wharton studio building, which still stands in Stewart Park, into a museum.

Robert H. Treman State Park

Robert H. Treman State Park, with its cascading waterfalls, winding trails, and magnificent views contains some of the most magnificent natural wonders found in Ithaca. In 1920, Robert H. Treman, an Ithaca banker and Cornell Trustee, and his wife Laura, donated the land to establish the Enfield Glen Reservation state park. The park was later renamed in memory of Treman in 1938. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rc9HrVu-fmw

Today, the park extends over 1,000 acres and includes nine miles of hiking trails, 12 waterfalls, including the spectacular 115-foot Lucifer Falls, a swimming area, cabins, and camping sites. In addition, visitors can find a 170-year-old gristmill within the park grounds, and spot numerous fossils in the shale rock lining the creek bed and gorge walls.

Cornell University

High above Cayuga Lake in Tompkins County sits a university that is consistently ranked as one of the top institutions of higher learning in the United States. Opened in 1868, Cornell University started in one building and with only 412 students. Today, it includes over 700 buildings, 14 colleges and schools, and enrolls over 20,000 students. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3HZ1-7WzYto

The university was the brainchild of New York Senator Ezra Cornell. Cornell had grown up poor, but had made a substantial fortune in the telegraph business.

Sciencenter

“Look, touch, listen and discover…” that’s what a visit to the Sciencenter in Ithaca is all about. Founded in 1983, the Sciencenter strives to inspire through its hands-on exhibits and programs, each designed to educate and engaged visitors in the wonders of science. With a variety of educational programs and over 250 exhibits, including a tide pool touch tank, an outdoor science park, and an astronomical exhibition, the museum can be appreciated by guests of all ages. One of the popular attractions is The Sagan Planet Walk exhibit, which was created in memory of former Ithaca resident and Cornell University professor Carl Sagan. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ei2Hx60221k

The Sagan Planet Walk is just one of the many things to LOOK AT, TOUCH, LISTEN TO, and DISCOVER while travelling New York’s Path Through History.

Ithaca College

In the 1800s, a young violin teacher in Ithaca named William Egbert had the dream of establishing a local music conservatory in the city. He worked hard by selling $50 shares to interested investors and in 1892, his dream came to fruition when the Ithaca Conservatory of Music opened its doors. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9VozeUHa3E

Known today as Ithaca College, the conservatory began with only eight students and operated out of rented rooms in a downtown Ithaca house. Today, the private coeducational college has grown to occupy 85 buildings on nearly 700 acres of land. Nearly 6,500 students are enrolled in a wide range of programs such as business, communications, the humanities, sciences, and music.

Museum of the Earth

Overlooking Cayuga Lake, Museum of the Earth in Ithaca, takes visitors on a journey through time that spans over four billion years — from the earth’s origin to the present day. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUdDRz5iCMw

Established in 2003 by the Paleontological Research Institute, Museum of the Earth provides a unique opportunity for visitors of all ages to learn about the history of life on earth in fun and exciting ways. In addition to the “Journey Through Time” exhibition, permanent features include a glacier exhibit, reconstructed Mastodon and Right Whale skeletons, a coral reef aquaria, and interactive discovery labs. Temporary exhibits include natural history displays, interactive science features, and art exhibitions. With each visit to Museum of the Earth there is more to be learned, making this not just an essential, but also a frequent stop on New York’s Path Through History.

The History Center of Tompkins County

Located in the renovated Gateway Center in Ithaca, just walking distance from the Commons, the History Center in Tompkins County maintains an extensive collection and provides a variety of unique exhibitions and programs on local history. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsH4BQal1JI

The center’s main goal is to give community members access to the tools needed to study the past in order to illuminate the present. To accomplish this mission the museum offers educational programs, workshops, resource programs, and walking tours — each designed to accommodate students and adults of all ages. Research materials include an extensive collection of books, manuscripts, ledgers, maps and photographs. The museum also house genealogy resources including thousands of local family files, cemetery listings, census records and directories.

Johnson Museum of Art

Opened in 1973, the Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University in Ithaca is home to one of the finest collections of ancient and modern art in Upstate New York. Designed by noted architect I.M. Pei, the building, a work of art itself, won the prestigious American Institute of Architects Honor award in 1975. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3FqzkN5i1Q

The museum’s collection includes over 35,000 works or art that span nearly six millennia of art history from around the world. A variety of exhibitions are held throughout the year. “Cosmos,” an ongoing computer controlled installation in the ceiling of the Mallin Sculpture Court, is a dazzling display of light imagery visible day and night.